Is it ok to house the projector inside a drop ceiling? (Images attached) - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 18 Old 07-26-2013, 07:39 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I will have a tray ceiling in the media room. Is it ok to hide the projector (front venting) inside the tray ceiling


This is the rough view of the back of the media room, showing the tray ceiling profile and where the projector will be (Click on the image for a larger view)




This will be the front view of the media room showing the screen placement



This is the floor plan, and I have drawn the tray ceiling profile (Ignore the bar design it had changed).



The dimensions for the housing is probably H10", W24", D24"


Thanks!
pcarfan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 Old 07-28-2013, 06:22 AM
Member
 
cripes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 160
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
You need to have enough ventilation to avoid overheating.

I have a BenQ W1070 partially mounted into a boxed I beam that runs through the center of the room. The cavity is about 20" wide, 8" deep and 6" high. The BenQ vents forward, which helps with heat in this setup. The 8" depth of the cavity I am working with isn't quite enough to house the projector so the projector sticks out about 4 inches (I made two arms to hold it), which also helps with airflow. I haven't had any overheating issues yet.

You will need to experiment, possibly adding CPU fans, vents or using a wider cavity if the projector gets too hot.
pcarfan likes this.
cripes is offline  
post #3 of 18 Old 07-28-2013, 10:16 AM
DGF
Senior Member
 
DGF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Gatos, CA
Posts: 484
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 39
I have an almost identical installation, first using a BenQ, and currently an Epson 8350. I originally thought I could get away with putting two 5" diameter vents behind the projector and utilize the inbuilt pulling/pushing power of the proctor's own fan, but would frequently hear it kick into 'high'. Then, as suggested by Cripes, I placed a couple of PC cooling fans above the inlet vents, immediately behind the PJ to 'encourage' airflow. This definitely works better, but I am now considering routing some trunking in from an adjacent closet to push a much higher volume of air into the projector cavity without a commensurate increase in fan noise.

Maybe an obvious point, but ambient room temperature plays a discernible role in how hard the fans (internal and/or external) have to work - if you keep the space at 70 degrees, you don't have the same issues as keeping it at 90!

My advice would be that what you are proposing is very viable, but try to leave yourself multiple options, just in case 'plan A' doesn't quite cut it.

Dave
pcarfan likes this.
DGF is offline  
post #4 of 18 Old 07-28-2013, 06:22 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cripes View Post

You need to have enough ventilation to avoid overheating.

I have a BenQ W1070 partially mounted into a boxed I beam that runs through the center of the room. The cavity is about 20" wide, 8" deep and 6" high. The BenQ vents forward, which helps with heat in this setup. The 8" depth of the cavity I am working with isn't quite enough to house the projector so the projector sticks out about 4 inches (I made two arms to hold it), which also helps with airflow. I haven't had any overheating issues yet.

You will need to experiment, possibly adding CPU fans, vents or using a wider cavity if the projector gets too hot.


Thank you very much!

BenQ W1070: Size (inches) (HxWxD) : 4.1 x 12.3 x 9.6

The JVC RS46 I have in mind: Size (inches) (HxWxD) : 7.1 x 17.9 x 18.6

Your projector is 4.1 inches high, which is rather thin and the 6" is working fine for you. The JVC RS46 I have in mind is 7.1 inches high and that means an 8.1 inch high enclosure will be equivalent, which is great info.

My tray ceiling is 1 foot high. The tray ceiling for the media room is not fabricated yet, but measuring the 1' tray ceiling in my dining room area tells me the framing will take up 3" leaving me with 9" high. But some sort of MDF board to fabricate the enclosure could take up an inch. This needs to be fabricated carefully to give me enough size. If the space is tight I may have to drop the part of the tray ceiling where the projector will be even lower ????

I am planning to use venting fans, I'll outline my plans in a separate reply
pcarfan is offline  
post #5 of 18 Old 07-28-2013, 06:34 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGF View Post

I have an almost identical installation, first using a BenQ, and currently an Epson 8350. I originally thought I could get away with putting two 5" diameter vents behind the projector and utilize the inbuilt pulling/pushing power of the proctor's own fan, but would frequently hear it kick into 'high'. Then, as suggested by Cripes, I placed a couple of PC cooling fans above the inlet vents, immediately behind the PJ to 'encourage' airflow. This definitely works better, but I am now considering routing some trunking in from an adjacent closet to push a much higher volume of air into the projector cavity without a commensurate increase in fan noise.

Maybe an obvious point, but ambient room temperature plays a discernible role in how hard the fans (internal and/or external) have to work - if you keep the space at 70 degrees, you don't have the same issues as keeping it at 90!

My advice would be that what you are proposing is very viable, but try to leave yourself multiple options, just in case 'plan A' doesn't quite cut it.

Dave

Thank you very much for replying. Good to hear from someone who had actually done it.

My media room is in the basement. The temperature will never be above 72, more like in the high 60's.

The JVC RS46 I will get is (Size (inches) (HxWxD) : 7.1 x 17.9 x 18.6) and it has a exhaust vent in the front and intakes at the back and at the bottom towards the front.

I am planning to install a fan at the back of the enclosure to pull fresh air in, it should vent from the front. This will give me good flow from back to front.

Then another fan on the right of the enclosure to pull in fresh air in and another fan on the left of the enclosure to pull out hot air. This will give me right to left air flow. Hoping this will be sufficient.

I've found this fan that directly plugs into an outlet which should work fine. This has two fans in one.

I am hoping to use this switch to turn it ON when the temp hits 100F. But 100F might be too hot for it to start, and this next one starts at 85F but doesn't go off till 65F, so may not work as the enclosure may never go down to 65F. Hoping this temp sensitive switch will have adjustable temperature.

I will have to talk to my electrician and see.
pcarfan is offline  
post #6 of 18 Old 07-28-2013, 06:38 PM
DGF
Senior Member
 
DGF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Gatos, CA
Posts: 484
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 39
I saw you asking in the projector forum about "pulling versus pushing" air through the unit - my approach is that the PJ designers sized the throughput to be sufficient to adequately cool the device, so once you've identified the inlet & outlets, the goal should be to feed the inlet side with enough air to ensure you don't choke it down. If you can avoid it, I'd stay away from trying to pull air through the projector.

If you do decide to use a PC fan (or fans), there are lots of sites that have some a wealth of info on the topic (www.slientpcreviewcom being one that comes to mind) - I use two largish fans (bigger fans can rotate slower for the same air throughput and are therefore quieter), controlled by a variable output 12v wall wart transformer - this allows me to balance the blade speed and noise. I'm able to set the pair so that I can't hear them, but they shift a sufficient amount of air to the back of the PJ (where my inlet is located) so that the internal fan can do its thing.

As an aside, it's surprising how many people ask "where's the projector?"! I've even had a couple of friends admire my "110" flat screen", because they couldn't see the PJ in the ceiling tray! Gotta love it!
DGF is offline  
post #7 of 18 Old 07-28-2013, 07:06 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGF View Post

I saw you asking in the projector forum about "pulling versus pushing" air through the unit - my approach is that the PJ designers sized the throughput to be sufficient to adequately cool the device, so once you've identified the inlet & outlets, the goal should be to feed the inlet side with enough air to ensure you don't choke it down. If you can avoid it, I'd stay away from trying to pull air through the projector.

If you do decide to use a PC fan (or fans), there are lots of sites that have some a wealth of info on the topic (www.slientpcreviewcom being one that comes to mind) - I use two largish fans (bigger fans can rotate slower for the same air throughput and are therefore quieter), controlled by a variable output 12v wall wart transformer - this allows me to balance the blade speed and noise. I'm able to set the pair so that I can't hear them, but they shift a sufficient amount of air to the back of the PJ (where my inlet is located) so that the internal fan can do its thing.

As an aside, it's surprising how many people ask "where's the projector?"! I've even had a couple of friends admire my "110" flat screen", because they couldn't see the PJ in the ceiling tray! Gotta love it!

That last sentence put a huge smile on my face, I'm so pumped.

I got the idea of pulling hot air out based on this article, what do you think?
OR you think may be a couple of fans at the back to just pull in fresh air in be enough?

Great idea with bigger fans for quitter operation. The only concern is, I don't even know what a 'variable output 12v wall wart transformer'is, I will do some research and see. But, what does it do? I found the ones I linked that operate plugging into an outlet, which I can handle smile.gif....If the transformer allows for me to get bigger more quitter fans, then I will want one.

How do you turn the fans ON and OFF?
pcarfan is offline  
post #8 of 18 Old 07-29-2013, 09:39 AM
DGF
Senior Member
 
DGF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Gatos, CA
Posts: 484
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 39
The fans you linked to look like they'll do a great job and, based on the feedback, seem like they are pretty quiet. This looks like a good way to go, but just for the sake of completeness, here's something similar to the type of 12v variable speed power supply I use:

http://www.amazon.com/Hosa-Cable-ACD477-Universal-Supply/dp/B000Z31G3M/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1375113491&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=mains+12v+variable+transformer

or

http://www.amazon.com/Velleman-Compact-Universal-Adapter-Supply/dp/B00068U44I/ref=pd_bxgy_MI_text_y

....then you have a very wide selection of PC-related fans to select from.

In terms of turning this on/off - I currently use a switched socket that also powers the projector, but am just about to buy an IP-controllable power strip that I can control using the Roomie IOS app. Another alternative would be to use a current-sensing power strip that detects when your PJ gets powered up, and switches the fans on/off accordingly, like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Smart-Energy-Saving-Autoswitching-Technology/dp/B000P1QJXQ

I did try a thermostatically controlled switch (don't remember the manufacturer), but found it to be a little challenging to dial in an appropriate temperature that suitably preempted the projector getting too warm - I now actually prefer to keep the temp down right from the start, and if you have quiet fans there is no downside to having them run all the time the PJ is on.

I wasn't 100% sure what the left/right fans are intended to do in your planned setup (versus the back-to-front pair), but I think you're on the right track - you just need to make sure that you don't allow a 'puddle' of hot air to accumulate anywhere near to the inlet location (otherwise you get an exponentially rising PJ temperature!) and make sure that the fans don't 'compete'.

Using a second fan/fans in front could work well to dissipate the heated air, but may be unnecessary - as long as you are getting sufficient airflow to the inlet and there's a mechanism to eject the warmed air away from the PJ, you're good to go (I've seen installations where there's very restricted airflow to the inlet, and people have assumed that putting a second fan in front to aid in pulling air through the device would work.....it doesn't! But I know this isn't what you're proposing.).

I did wonder if I'd get any dust accumulation on the ceiling immediately in front of the projector because of the continual flow of air over the same spot, but even after several years of pretty heavy use, this hasn't been an issue at all.

Dave
pcarfan likes this.
DGF is offline  
post #9 of 18 Old 07-29-2013, 11:58 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGF View Post

The fans you linked to look like they'll do a great job and, based on the feedback, seem like they are pretty quiet. This looks like a good way to go, but just for the sake of completeness, here's something similar to the type of 12v variable speed power supply I use:

http://www.amazon.com/Hosa-Cable-ACD477-Universal-Supply/dp/B000Z31G3M/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1375113491&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=mains+12v+variable+transformer

or

http://www.amazon.com/Velleman-Compact-Universal-Adapter-Supply/dp/B00068U44I/ref=pd_bxgy_MI_text_y

....then you have a very wide selection of PC-related fans to select from.

In terms of turning this on/off - I currently use a switched socket that also powers the projector, but am just about to buy an IP-controllable power strip that I can control using the Roomie IOS app. Another alternative would be to use a current-sensing power strip that detects when your PJ gets powered up, and switches the fans on/off accordingly, like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Smart-Energy-Saving-Autoswitching-Technology/dp/B000P1QJXQ

I did try a thermostatically controlled switch (don't remember the manufacturer), but found it to be a little challenging to dial in an appropriate temperature that suitably preempted the projector getting too warm - I now actually prefer to keep the temp down right from the start, and if you have quiet fans there is no downside to having them run all the time the PJ is on.

I wasn't 100% sure what the left/right fans are intended to do in your planned setup (versus the back-to-front pair), but I think you're on the right track - you just need to make sure that you don't allow a 'puddle' of hot air to accumulate anywhere near to the inlet location (otherwise you get an exponentially rising PJ temperature!) and make sure that the fans don't 'compete'.

Using a second fan/fans in front could work well to dissipate the heated air, but may be unnecessary - as long as you are getting sufficient airflow to the inlet and there's a mechanism to eject the warmed air away from the PJ, you're good to go (I've seen installations where there's very restricted airflow to the inlet, and people have assumed that putting a second fan in front to aid in pulling air through the device would work.....it doesn't! But I know this isn't what you're proposing.).

I did wonder if I'd get any dust accumulation on the ceiling immediately in front of the projector because of the continual flow of air over the same spot, but even after several years of pretty heavy use, this hasn't been an issue at all.

Dave

There is a lot of extremely good info for me here. Appreciate it very much, thank you!
pcarfan is offline  
post #10 of 18 Old 08-25-2013, 05:55 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Its framed for it now. The house should be completed by December. I'll post the finished setup then.



pcarfan is offline  
post #11 of 18 Old 08-27-2013, 09:00 AM
DGF
Senior Member
 
DGF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Gatos, CA
Posts: 484
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 39
Wow - that's looking really exciting! Thanks for posting.

As this is new construction, another option to consider might be to duct in cooler air to supply the projector from an adjacent room using a remote fan - flexible ducting would allow you to push large volumes of air in without the associated intakes being visible. I'm actually going to do this myself to make the ceiling less visually cluttered.

I know this is somewhat off topic, but I think we both share the aspiration of a "semi-stealth" install - my room is a dedicated home theater, but when I listen to music, or just hang out with friends, I have designed my masking system to fully cover the screen. I commissioned an artist friend to create a couple of 3'x4' acrylic on canvas pieces and have inset them in the pair of side-to-side masks - they completely disguise the fact there is a 120" screen hiding behind them - when retracted for viewing, the paintings aren't visible at all. I also designed the wall and door panels to make the theater's three doorways undetectable when closed - it just looks like a completely paneled space, without doors (just realized how creepy that sounds: it really isn't!). There are other features like this in the room, and in conjunction with the drop-ceiling mounted projector, I'm really pleased with the 'low key' overall effect - it makes for an even greater contrast when I flick the switch and crank up the volume!

I'll be watching to see how your own build-out progresses - good luck with it!

Dave
DGF is offline  
post #12 of 18 Old 08-27-2013, 07:52 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Tedd's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Ontario
Posts: 3,895
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked: 63
Don't box the front speakers in, in columns.

Ever consider an AT screen and wall to wall false wall? Get you center channel up higher (or better yet, use three identical front speakers).
Less would be more here, as in better speaker placement, and no near boundaries to bounce light back onto the screen (reducing contrast).

The basement might very well climb in temperature, depending on the equipment heat load, and the number of bodies. This is a common enough, rookie mistake.
Tedd is offline  
post #13 of 18 Old 08-29-2013, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGF View Post

Wow - that's looking really exciting! Thanks for posting.

As this is new construction, another option to consider might be to duct in cooler air to supply the projector from an adjacent room using a remote fan - flexible ducting would allow you to push large volumes of air in without the associated intakes being visible. I'm actually going to do this myself to make the ceiling less visually cluttered.

I know this is somewhat off topic, but I think we both share the aspiration of a "semi-stealth" install - my room is a dedicated home theater, but when I listen to music, or just hang out with friends, I have designed my masking system to fully cover the screen. I commissioned an artist friend to create a couple of 3'x4' acrylic on canvas pieces and have inset them in the pair of side-to-side masks - they completely disguise the fact there is a 120" screen hiding behind them - when retracted for viewing, the paintings aren't visible at all. I also designed the wall and door panels to make the theater's three doorways undetectable when closed - it just looks like a completely paneled space, without doors (just realized how creepy that sounds: it really isn't!). There are other features like this in the room, and in conjunction with the drop-ceiling mounted projector, I'm really pleased with the 'low key' overall effect - it makes for an even greater contrast when I flick the switch and crank up the volume!

I'll be watching to see how your own build-out progresses - good luck with it!

Dave

Thanks!

I had briefly considered cooler air from an outside room, however I decided to go with vent fans which will draw air from the surrounding basement soffit areas. I am convinced having seen hushbox designs with even enclosed fronts that this should suffice. My fronts are open.

The only other 'stealthy' thing I am doing is hiding the speakers and will paint that door to the side the same color as the wall color. Overall, I like the look of the media room, just doesn't like a projector hanging down in the middle.
pcarfan is offline  
post #14 of 18 Old 08-29-2013, 11:59 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedd View Post

Don't box the front speakers in, in columns.

Ever consider an AT screen and wall to wall false wall? Get you center channel up higher (or better yet, use three identical front speakers).
Less would be more here, as in better speaker placement, and no near boundaries to bounce light back onto the screen (reducing contrast).

The basement might very well climb in temperature, depending on the equipment heat load, and the number of bodies. This is a common enough, rookie mistake.

Thanks!

I am getting a 148" 2:35 screen. I need a high gain screen given the size and the projector being high. I am going with the Da-Lite high power screen for this. I've looked at perforated screens, and even at around 1.5 gain they are so expensive.

I am not hiding the speakers inside the column. The space behind the screen is unfinished basement area which will house all the A/V equipment and the speakers will be recessed into that space. The attached image shows it. I know the center speaker will have to be low and the tweeters won't be aligned, however it's a compromise I'll have to make.

I know having that unfinished area behind renders itself to an excellent false wall solution. I need the screen to be flush with the existing wall for the required throw distance. It is a load bearing wall, but I guess I could have still designed it with an extra wall in the unfinished area. But the cost of the perforated screen and all the structural additions just wasn't worth it just to get the center speaker higher.

pcarfan is offline  
post #15 of 18 Old 09-08-2013, 07:18 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Rough drywall is in, too exciting not to post till the end smile.gif

Bar in the foreground, media room at the back


Media room



Looking into the bar area


Bar design


Media room at an angle


Media room and bar at the background, taken form the basement great room. It is a walk out basement
pcarfan is offline  
post #16 of 18 Old 09-10-2013, 11:59 AM
DGF
Senior Member
 
DGF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Gatos, CA
Posts: 484
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 39
Nice - really starting to come together!!

It's usually at about this point in the project that I start to second-guess all the decisions I made about wiring runs, equipment placement, sound-proofing, etc....... smile.gif
DGF is offline  
post #17 of 18 Old 09-11-2013, 06:02 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGF View Post

Nice - really starting to come together!!

It's usually at about this point in the project that I start to second-guess all the decisions I made about wiring runs, equipment placement, sound-proofing, etc....... smile.gif


Tell me about it.....I wired for 11.2, so I am set with that. But, I had planned to do rope lighting only on the sides of the media room tray ceiling, now I am thinking whether I should include the front as well, or may be all four sides. It's just that, my tray ceiling for the media room is only on the front and sides. The back just flows with the lowered ceiling in the bar. I didn't want the rope light in the front as I may leave that on for some movies and I didn't want the glare. Now, I am thinking it may look odd to have rope lighting on just the sides.

First I though I will paint the walls dark. That whole wall where the screen will go will have wood work. So, I am only dealing with the small wall to the right and the wall to the left and the ceiling. I really can't paint the ceiling as there is no place to stop it and I don't want dark ceiling in the bar as it is getting some dark cabinets. The wall on either side is not going to be a huge deal, given I am going for a muted media room look and not look like a dedicated theater. So, now i am not going too dark with the walls either.

I am even thinking of just hanging the PJ in that niche and not worry about covering it up. This way i don't have to worry about ventillation and it will still be out of the way tucked into the niche. With the 148" screen and the surrounding wood work covering that entire 20'6" wide wall staring at me, how much stealthiness do I really need for the PJ. I am going to wait for my carpenter and electricain to give me a quote and then decide. What do you think?

I have 6 can lights in the middle and 3 sconces light to the left and 1 sconces on the right. There will be two half thicknedd columns on either side of the screen. I was first wondering whether I should have half thickness columns where the sconces light will be. Then I thought I wanted a more muted look. I still think I want a muted look, but it's just going back and forth all the time.

May be once I get the cost for all of this, I might just scrap most of the wood work ideas, we'll see.

I am not sound proofing anything here. Decided not to, we'll see.
pcarfan is offline  
post #18 of 18 Old 10-31-2013, 04:21 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
pcarfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Drew this and gave to my carpenter to finish out. The screen is to actual size, so are the wood work. Only the acoustic panels and sconces lighting not to scale.
The tray ceiling will be painted the same color as the wall and will get crown moulding and rope lighting. It should be completed in a couple of months and I'll post the finished images then.



pcarfan is offline  
Reply General Home Theater & Media/Game Rooms

Tags
Benq W1070 1080p 3d Projector , Epson Powerlite Home Cinema 8350 , Jvc Dla Rs46 Projector
Gear in this thread - W1070 by PriceGrabber.com

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off