Mounting Screen on wall with sideways studs - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 06-25-2014, 06:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Mounting Screen on wall with sideways studs

I am planning to mount my 50 in LED screen on my living room wall. While locating the studs I found out that the wall has 2x4 studs turned sideways, such that the studs have their 4 in side flat against the sheet rock, instead of the more normal 2 in side flat against the wall. Consequently the wall is only 2 inches thick (with 1/2 in sheet rock) from the font of the sheet rock to the wall in the next room.

I can handle all the electrical stuff using low profile receptacle boxes etc., but I am concerned about the ability of the studs to handle the load of the screen and mount.

I've checked a number of forums and seen a few threads similar to this, but without any clear advice.

Does anybody have any experience with this and would be willing to share.
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post #2 of 18 Old 06-25-2014, 08:48 PM
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You don't even need to be on a stud with a 50 LCD. Use 1/4 snap toggles in the drywall to mount the bracket.

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post #3 of 18 Old 06-25-2014, 11:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Grooms View Post
You don't even need to be on a stud with a 50 LCD. Use 1/4 snap toggles in the drywall to mount the bracket.
I had thought of that, but I'm using a swivel mount and am concerned that repeated pulling on the mount as the screen swivels would pull the anchors out.

Screwing into the studs seems to be a preferred approach to me, but with the studs positioned as they are I am concerned that they may not take the weight and may start bowing. Also I would have to use smaller length bolts so that I didn't go all the way through the stud.

However if you feel that using toggles in the sheet rock is OK, then I may consider that. Have you done this yourself?
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post #4 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 04:16 AM
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I own a AV business and we've literally hung hundreds of TV's. Snap toggles in wall board will hold an 80" display without worry. We do chin ups on the bracket before hanging the display to insure it's safe.

Articulating mounts are a different story. They put some outward pressure on the top anchors. With flat and tilt mounts it's all downward pressure where snap toggles are OK.

Although a modern 50" display isn't very heavy. (35-45lbs? ) but you'll still want to use a mount that will span at least 1 stud. Run a couple short lag bolts through the top of the bracket into the stud(s) and a couple snap toggles (3-4) and it won't come down.

Lowes sells 1/4 snap toggles. They are in a blue box. You can pick up some 1" lag bolts there too.

Don't worry, it will work nicely. Just get a bracket that is 20" or so wide @ the mounting plate. I would feel better using one of those than the top and bottom style 2 anchor bolt pattern on smaller articulating brackets.
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post #5 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 05:04 AM
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I've created my own studs before by cutting out a section of drywall and adding 2x4s as needed so you can have a stud exactly where its needed. however, the drywall anchors which you screw such as THESE hold a ton of weight each. A single one could support your TV.

Also try Molly Bolts or Toggles as these are the strongest anchor you can use.

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Last edited by smarcus3; 06-26-2014 at 05:11 AM.
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post #6 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 09:28 AM
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I'm overly paranoid when it comes to things like this. I would not mount without at least one stud. [I)Especially[/I] with an articulating one.

You could either remove the drywall and add in the studs like suggested. Or remove the drywall, and put some plywood across the horizontal "studs"
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post #7 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 10:44 AM
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The sideways studs will be plenty strong to hold your tv with articulating mount.
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post #8 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crn3371 View Post
The sideways studs will be plenty strong to hold your tv with articulating mount.
If you can hit more than one vertically, which probably isn't the case.
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post #9 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post
If you can hit more than one vertically, which probably isn't the case.
Studs are in the typical vertical orientation, it's just that they are turned sideways.
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post #10 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crn3371 View Post
Studs are in the typical vertical orientation, it's just that they are turned sideways.
You mean the 4 side towards you? After reading again you clearly do. Those will be plenty strong with 1.5 inches of thread engagement. The stud in that formation is just as strong with downward forces. Strong enough to hold up your house strong enough for a tv.



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Last edited by smarcus3; 06-26-2014 at 12:11 PM.
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post #11 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 03:07 PM
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AHHHHH. I was taking it to mean horizontal. And that seemed really odd to me.

This is still odd, but not nearly that odd.

Mount to stud as normal.
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post #12 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 08:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post
AHHHHH. I was taking it to mean horizontal. And that seemed really odd to me.

This is still odd, but not nearly that odd.

Mount to stud as normal.
Thanks everybody for your replies, very much appreciated.

The wall is the back wall of a bedroom closet, the builder obviously decided to make the wall just 2.5 in thick instead of the normal 4.5 in thick, I guess so there was more space in the closet. Turning the studs sideways allowed him to do this. The studs are still on 16 in centers so I can still find a couple of studs to use, I was just concerned that I would only have 1.5 in depth of wood to screw into instead of the usual 3.5 in. Other threads I have looked at also discussed issues of the studs having less ability to withstand the sheer forces caused by the TV and mount when they are turned sideways.

But, having read all your comments, I feel much better about this now. I plan to go ahead with the work next week and see what happens. I'll post the results.

Thanks guys!
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post #13 of 18 Old 06-26-2014, 11:35 PM
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If you're concerned about 1 1/2" not giving you enough "meat" to sink a lag screw into, and the other side of wall is the inside of a closet, drill a hole completely through the wall and use a bolt and nut.
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post #14 of 18 Old 06-27-2014, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crn3371 View Post
If you're concerned about 1 1/2" not giving you enough "meat" to sink a lag screw into, and the other side of wall is the inside of a closet, drill a hole completely through the wall and use a bolt and nut.
A 2x4 is incredibly strong. Use coarse threaded drywall screws and you'll be good to go. If you are super worries use carriage bolts through the entire 2x4 and bolt the end. This would be able to support an elephant.

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post #15 of 18 Old 06-27-2014, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by smarcus3 View Post
A 2x4 is incredibly strong. Use coarse threaded drywall screws and you'll be good to go. If you are super worries use carriage bolts through the entire 2x4 and bolt the end. This would be able to support an elephant.
I don't like to see people using drywall screws for things like this. They are NOT designed to withstand much shear load. They are designed for lateral load.
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post #16 of 18 Old 06-27-2014, 08:10 AM
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I don't like to see people using drywall screws for things like this. They are NOT designed to withstand much shear load. They are designed for lateral load.
True. A nail is better in shear than a screw. This is why for decking steps nails are used for instance. However, according to NDS for wood construction the shear load allowed for a #8 screw is still 87 pounds. If you have access to the other end use carriage bolts or similar as I previously suggested. You could use lag bolts directly into the 2x4 which would be strong as well. With the mount you should be able to get many into the stud to provide an adequate connection.

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Last edited by smarcus3; 06-27-2014 at 08:22 AM.
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post #17 of 18 Old 06-27-2014, 08:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smarcus3 View Post
True. A nail is better in shear than a screw. This is why for decking steps nails are used for instance. However, according to NDS for wood construction the shear load allowed for a #8 screw is still 87 pounds. If you have access to the other end use carriage bolts or similar as I previously suggested. You could use lag bolts directly into the 2x4 which would be strong as well. With the mount you should be able to get many into the stud to provide an adequate connection.
Yes, but a "drywall screw" is NOT a #8 wood screw. They are brittle and snap easily. Put one in a board halfway, and smack it with a hammer. I bet your wife could snap it off.
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post #18 of 18 Old 06-27-2014, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post
Yes, but a "drywall screw" is NOT a #8 wood screw. They are brittle and snap easily. Put one in a board halfway, and smack it with a hammer. I bet your wife could snap it off.
Now we are completely off the original subject but enjoying the discussion ....

True but that's a dynamic load not a static load. The same reason a rope might support 6000 pounds static load but might only be suitable for 200 pounds in a falling or dynamic load. A swinging hammer momentary generates a huge force on the screw hence shearing it off. Unless you plan jump on you TV mount this type of loading shouldn't be considered. If you suspend a weight from the screw you should be able to hang >>>> than a TV however a swinging weight of 1# (i.e. hammer) will shear it off.

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Last edited by smarcus3; 06-27-2014 at 09:49 AM.
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