In general, how many GB is a 45 minute TV show in 1080p? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 08:46 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
b_scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 17
Trying to get info for someone. Thanks if you know! Can't find it on google.
b_scott is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 08:48 AM
AVS Special Member
 
42041's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 3,289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
Depends on the bitrate. Generally around 10-15GB.
42041 is offline  
post #3 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 08:53 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
b_scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 17
thanks for the info
b_scott is offline  
post #4 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 08:59 AM
AVS Special Member
 
b.greenway's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 3,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
1080p TV shows? I assume you mean 1080i.
b.greenway is offline  
post #5 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:00 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
b_scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 17
no, i mean 1080p. on blu-ray.
b_scott is offline  
post #6 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:11 AM
Member
 
Princess Aurora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by b.greenway View Post

1080p TV shows? I assume you mean 1080i.

It doesn't matter. Resolution has nothing to do with the actual file size. Unless the video is uncompressed (or compressed losslessly), you can make any resolution pretty much any file size you want, within obvious reason. Codecs often have maximum and minimum bitrates, and you can never exceed the bitrate of uncompressed video anyway (although the lossy codecs, of course, don't come close to that). On Blu-ray, you're limited by the maximum bitrate of the format's specification.

And actually, on Blu-ray, 1080i has more information in it, since it has 60 interlaced fields corresponding to 30 frames. 1080p is always 24 frames on Blu-ray. The spec doesn't allow for 1080p video at 30 or 60 fps.


The answer to the original question is: it completely depends on the encode, and only on the bitrate (the codec is irrelevant when it comes to filesize). Some TV shows use VC-1 to get the average bitrate under 20 Mb/s to jam more episodes on a disc, while others use AVC encodes in the mid 30 Mb/s range (still others use AVC in the 20's). At 20 Mb/s, 45 min of video would take up 6750 MB. At 30 Mb/s, 45 min of video takes up 10125 MB.

That doesn't include the audio. Lossless audio takes up 2-4 Mb/s (depending on the codec), while lossy audio can be anywhere. The space taken up for a Dolby Digital track at 640 Kb/s is pretty much nothing in comparison to the video (about 210 MB for 45 min).
Princess Aurora is offline  
post #7 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:18 AM
 
FoxyMulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Scotland
Posts: 5,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I think Warner shows like Smallville must be around 7gb in size since around 6 episodes are on each disc.

I am currently watching 24 Season 7 on Blu Ray and i note the frame rate says 23.976. Was 24 shot on film or is this a 30fps show being converted on Blu Ray to 23.976fps and if it's being converted what are the side effects ?
FoxyMulder is offline  
post #8 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:22 AM
AVS Special Member
 
42041's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 3,289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyMulder View Post

I am currently watching 24 Season 7 on Blu Ray and i note the frame rate says 23.976. Was 24 shot on film or is this a 30fps show being converted on Blu Ray to 23.976fps and if it's being converted what are the side effects ?

All properly mastered 24fps blu-rays should be 23.976 fps (24/1.001). I'm not familiar with the technical reason for it. The show 24 is show on 35mm as far as I know.
42041 is offline  
post #9 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:24 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Morpheo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Montreal by day, Paris by night...
Posts: 6,676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Liked: 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyMulder View Post

I think Warner shows like Smallville must be around 7gb in size since around 6 episodes are on each disc.

I am currently watching 24 Season 7 on Blu Ray and i note the frame rate says 23.976. Was 24 shot on film or is this a 30fps show being converted on Blu Ray to 23.976fps and if it's being converted what are the side effects ?

Maybe they just shot in HD... In that case 23.976 fps is normal...
Morpheo is offline  
post #10 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:29 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Morpheo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Montreal by day, Paris by night...
Posts: 6,676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Liked: 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42041 View Post

The show 24 is show on 35mm as far as I know.

oops
Morpheo is offline  
post #11 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:30 AM
 
FoxyMulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Scotland
Posts: 5,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42041 View Post

All properly mastered 24fps blu-rays should be 23.976 fps (24/1.001). I'm not familiar with the technical reason for it. The show 24 is show on 35mm as far as I know.

I know that i was referring to the fact i thought American shows were shot 30fps.

If it's shot 35mm then that explains why it's 23.976.

I imagine shows shot on digital HD cameras could also be 23.976fps.

Kind of off topic but the Australian edition of The Descent is wrongly encoded at a pure 24fps instead of 23.976fps. Pity that as it's the best version of the movie around. I haven't noticed any issues during playback though.
FoxyMulder is offline  
post #12 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 09:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
42041's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 3,289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyMulder View Post

I know that i was referring to the fact i thought American shows were shot 30fps.

I don't watch much TV, but those would probably be the exceptions rather than the rule. Most American prime time TV series I've seen are in 24fps, even the stuff shot digitally like The Office.
42041 is offline  
post #13 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 10:30 AM
Advanced Member
 
CRT Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Your google-fu is weak. You must train harder.
Plug bitrate*runtime into google e.g. 20Mbps*22 minutes.
CRT Dude is offline  
post #14 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 10:45 AM
AVS Special Member
 
MovieSwede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Gothenburg
Posts: 6,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked: 37
There is no simple answer.

If you use as an ABR

8 mbs = 2,7 gb
16 mbs = 5,4 gb
32 mbs 10,8 gb
MovieSwede is offline  
post #15 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 10:51 AM
AVS Special Member
 
MovieSwede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Gothenburg
Posts: 6,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42041 View Post

I don't watch much TV, but those would probably be the exceptions rather than the rule. Most American prime time TV series I've seen are in 24fps, even the stuff shot digitally like The Office.

Yes 24fps gives an economic advantage. You need 25% more film if you shoot 30fps, computers need 25% more rendering. Its easier to use stock footage. Its easier to convert to PAL (with quality). You need 25% more storage.
MovieSwede is offline  
post #16 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 11:01 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Cinema Squid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 2,864
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
You can also check the specs thread to see many individual examples:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1155731

There is often disc-by-disc variance even within a single season depending on the number of episodes on each, other extra features consuming space, etc. as can be seen in the Battlestar Galactica specs currently being posted by eric.exe.
Cinema Squid is offline  
post #17 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 02:11 PM
AVS Special Member
 
William's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 8,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by b_scott View Post

no, i mean 1080p. on blu-ray.

BD only supports 1080i @60Hz.
William is offline  
post #18 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 02:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
msgohan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 2,856
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post

BD only supports 1080i @60Hz.

Good thing most shows are shot on film or digital video @ 24fps then.
msgohan is offline  
post #19 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 02:18 PM
AVS Special Member
 
MovieSwede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Gothenburg
Posts: 6,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post

BD only supports 1080i @60Hz.

Most shows are recorded as 24P.
MovieSwede is offline  
post #20 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 02:24 PM
AVS Special Member
 
William's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 8,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovieSwede View Post

Most shows are recorded as 24P.

Well aware of that but that's not the OP's question or assertion. There are many "specials" that are shot at 60Hz (like concerts and almost all sporting events since 24Hz is too slow) that have and will find there way to BD.

My statement still stands and is correct that BD doesn't support 1080p 60Hz.
William is offline  
post #21 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 02:27 PM
 
FoxyMulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Scotland
Posts: 5,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post

Well aware of that but that's not the OP question or assertion. There are many "specials" that are shot at 60Hz (like concerts and almost all sporting events since 24Hz is too slow) that have and will find there way to BD.

My statement still stands and is correct that BD doesn't support 1080p 60Hz.

I assume when the new Panasonic Blu Ray players that support their new 3D format start arriving next year that have HDMI 1.4 and 120hz capability for 60hz each image ( 3D - 60hz per image and two separate images for 120hz total ) that 1080p 60hz will then be supported but it will be breaking away from the format as we currently know it.
FoxyMulder is offline  
post #22 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 11:52 PM
 
troglobite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyMulder View Post

I know that i was referring to the fact i thought American shows were shot 30fps.

You thought wrong. Most TV shows are shot using 24p HD cameras. There is no such thing as broadcasting in 24p, so the shows are converted to 1080i60SF or 720p60SF (segmented frame). When the show is released on Blu-ray, it's left in its original frame rate.

But to answer the OP's original question, the maximum bitrate allowed for Blu-ray is 54-mbit, so that means at most ~17.8 gigabyte. So it doesn't matter if it's 1080p, 1080i, 720p, etc. 17.8 gig is the maximum. The uncompressed size would be way more than that anyway even for 720p.
troglobite is offline  
post #23 of 23 Old 08-29-2009, 11:55 PM
Member
 
Princess Aurora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Blu-ray's maximum transfer rate is 54 Mb/s, but only 48 Mb/s of that can be used for audio and video combined. Further, the video can only be 40 Mb/s max (audio and video are demultiplexed), even if the audio is smaller than 8 Mb/s.

The absolute maximum is therefore 13500 MB, plus audio.
Princess Aurora is offline  
Reply Blu-ray Software



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off