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post #91 of 109 Old 05-20-2012, 11:31 AM
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Just watched it and was impressed. I'm a huge fan of Alec's original version. But the shorter film version holds its own and was pretty tight. Plus, it looks great on BR! Now I'm in the mood to go back and watch the original.

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post #92 of 109 Old 05-20-2012, 11:37 AM
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I'll agree the movie's not for everybody. But I, for one, loved it. We watched it with some friends, and one of them (who also loved it) commented that they just don't make movies like this any more. She said it felt a lot like some of the classics from thirty years ago.

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post #93 of 109 Old 05-20-2012, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shimonmor View Post

Just watched it and was impressed. I'm a huge fan of Alec's original version. But the shorter film version holds its own and was pretty tight. Plus, it looks great on BR! Now I'm in the mood to go back and watch the original.

I agree that the 1080p video and HD audio the BD provide are big selling points. I plan to watch it again this evening. Then I may go back and watch my old DVDs of the wonderful British miniseries of Tinker Tailor, starring Alec Guinness. The old DVDs don't look or sound very good by modern standards but they are nonetheless wonderfully entertaining.
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post #94 of 109 Old 05-20-2012, 02:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

I agree that the 1080p video and HD audio the BD provide are big selling points. I plan to watch it again this evening. Then I may go back and watch my old DVDs of the wonderful British miniseries of Tinker Tailor, starring Alec Guinness. The old DVDs don't look or sound very good by modern standards but they are nonetheless wonderfully entertaining.

I love the series, but Ricki Tarr grates on me more year after year.
Hywel Bennett's performance is I think, the only bad thing about it.
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post #95 of 109 Old 05-20-2012, 02:13 PM
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I love the series, but Ricki Tarr grates on me more year after year.
Hywel Bennett's performance is I think, the only bad thing about it.

I respectfully disagree. I thought Bennett's Ricki Tarr was faithful to the way LeCarre wrote the character: he was an effective operator but a con man and a thug nevertheless. That's what I saw in the miniseries. I saw the same thing in the movie, though. Tom Hardy's patented combination of charm and sleaziness was perfectly used in his performance as Ricki. I agree, though, that Bennett never had the kind of talent Hardy has demonstrated in his meteoric career.
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post #96 of 109 Old 05-20-2012, 02:28 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

I respectfully disagree. I thought Bennett's Ricki Tarr was faithful to the way LeCarre wrote the character: he was an effective operator but a con man and a thug nevertheless. That's what I saw in the miniseries. I saw the same thing in the movie, though. Tom Hardy's patented combination of charm and sleaziness was perfectly used in his performance as Ricki. I agree, though, that Bennett never had the kind of talent Hardy has demonstrated in his meteoric career.

I agree in part, but Bennett was way to stagey in his performance, he does not know how to be understated when he needs to be.
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post #97 of 109 Old 05-21-2012, 07:25 AM
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I agree in part, but Bennett was way to stagey in his performance, he does not know how to be understated when he needs to be.

I know what you mean but I forgave him for his hyper-emotionalism because of the fix he was in. When your new Joe has been adducted and both the Russians and some of your own people are trying to kill you, it tends to get you a little excited. In any case, I think we can agree that Bennett's acting chops were never in a class with those of Tom Hardy, who played Ricki Tarr in the 2011 film.

I rewatched my Tinker Tailor BD last night and loved it, again. Gary Oldman was great as Smiley. I also liked Benedict Cumberbatch as Peter Guillam. No surprise there, though, the Sherlock series he is now starring in is one of my favorite shows these days. Can hardly wait for Series 3!
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post #98 of 109 Old 05-21-2012, 09:47 PM
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picked up my copy at the video store so im finally looking forward to watch this tonight.

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post #99 of 109 Old 05-22-2012, 09:41 AM
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Just finished watching it i enjoyed it kept me interested right to the end. I don't mind films like this makes you look out for everything that's going on. I will watch it again.

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post #100 of 109 Old 05-22-2012, 09:54 AM
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Just finished watching it i enjoyed it kept me interested right to the end. I don't mind films like this makes you look out for everything that's going on. I will watch it again.

Frank -- It's great that you enjoyed the movie. I can practically guarantee that you will find a second viewing even more enjoyable.
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post #101 of 109 Old 05-22-2012, 10:02 AM
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Frank -- It's great that you enjoyed the movie. I can practically guarantee that you will find a second viewing even more enjoyable.

I know I will but thank you for your recommendation gwsat.

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post #102 of 109 Old 05-22-2012, 08:54 PM
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I know what you mean but I forgave him for his hyper-emotionalism because of the fix he was in. When your new Joe has been adducted and both the Russians and some of your own people are trying to kill you, it tends to get you a little excited. In any case, I think we can agree that Bennett's acting chops were never in a class with those of Tom Hardy, who played Ricki Tarr in the 2011 film.

I rewatched my Tinker Tailor BD last night and loved it, again. Gary Oldman was great as Smiley. I also liked Benedict Cumberbatch as Peter Guillam. No surprise there, though, the Sherlock series he is now starring in is one of my favorite shows these days. Can hardly wait for Series 3!

I agree Gary Oldman was great.
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I like the way smiley left that little piece of wood nudged at bottom of door to alert him if anyone was inside the house, quiet clever I thought.


Definitely not a snoozefest in my opinion.

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post #103 of 109 Old 05-23-2012, 07:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franin View Post

I agree Gary Oldman was great.
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I like the way smiley left that little piece of wood nudged at bottom of door to alert him if anyone was inside the house, quiet clever I thought.


Definitely not a snoozefest in my opinion.

George Smiley is perhaps my favorite literary character. At the risk of polluting the thread with unwanted detritus, I am going to append to this post an essay about George and his wife, the beautiful and elegant serial betrayer, Lady Ann. I hope that some of you enjoy it:

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THE UNHAPPY MARRIAGE OF GEORGE AND ANN SMILEY
By Grey Wilson Satterfield Jr.
© 1992, All Rights Reserved.

Literature is filled with unhappy marriages, Galsworthy's Soames and Irené Forsyte, Dickens's Bumbles are examples. Few marriages in literature, though, have been more corrosive than that of LeCarré's Ann and George Smiley. No unhappy marriage in literature has had a longer run. In most of the Smiley books I have seen Ann Smiley as something of a monster trapped in an unhappy marriage. But I recently got a new insight into Ann, and her relationship with George, in Call for the Dead, LeCarré's first novel, published in 1961.

George's courtship of Ann begins During World War II. He is nearing 40, bland, enigmatic, fat, and nearsighted; but George is brilliant and George is a spy.

George married the beautiful Lady Ann Sercomb near the end of the war. She described him to her astonished Mayfair friends as breathtakingly ordinary. One of Ann's friends said he appeared to spend a lot of money on really bad clothes. When she left him two years later for a Cuban race car driver, she said if she hadn't left him then, she might never have done it. When Lady Ann followed her motor racing star to Cuba, she gave some thought to Smiley. She concluded with grudging admiration that if there were an only man in her life he would be George Smiley.

As a spy, George put his considerable intellect to observing humanity with clinical objectivity. He did so while shrinking from the temptations of friendship and human loyalty; he guarded himself warily from spontaneous reaction. Then he met Ann. Ann was charming and outgoing. A brilliant conversationalist, she put everyone at ease and brought out the best in them. Gradually, she got George to show her the subtle brilliance, which he so assiduously hid from others. She learned who the man really was. And he came to love her.

For the first time, George had someone with whom he could share not only his knowledge, but his thoughts and aspirations. At a candle-lit dinner over a good wine George told Ann how he hated to be interviewed, "interrogated" he called it. Because of his secretive nature, interviews offended George. He delighted her with his explanation that he used the chameleon-armadillo principal to handle such ordeals. He explained that first he took on the protective coloration of the chameleon. That is he would agree with everything the interviewer said. But if the interviewer did not accept the chameleon ploy and acted too agressively for George's tastes, George would go into armadillo mode. He would use his hard shell to divert all attacks, tell nothing, state no opinions, and keep his temper in the face of overt attempts to make him lose it.

During George's courtship of Ann, and their marriage, George was a subject of ridicule among Ann's friends. But George was a perfect spy: he had the knack of not being remembered. When the divorce had come and gone Ann's friends thought no more of George. They were not curious about the effect of Lady Ann's departure upon her former husband.

George's reaction to Ann's leaving was impossible to determine. Afterward, he looked the same to his fellow intelligence officers. As usual, he was hiding something. Though he didn't show it, when Lady Ann ran away, a little of George Smiley died

When Ann left him George began by rigorously excluding all trace of her. He even got rid of her books. But gradually he allowed the few remaining symbols that linked his life with hers to reassert themselves: wedding presents from close friends that meant too much to be given away. Among them was a group of Dresden china figurines.

George loved to admire the tiny Dresden figures, the tiny rococo courtesan in shepherd's costume, her hands outstretched to one adoring lover, her little face bestowing glances on another. He felt inadequate before that fragile perfection as he had felt before Ann when he began the conquest that had amazed Mayfair society. Somehow the little figures comforted him. It was as useless to expect fidelity of Ann as of this tiny shepherdess. The Dresden group had been the prize of the collection of a friend. Perhaps his friend guessed that one day George might need the simple philosophy it propounded.

It is now years later. George returns home after several weeks absence. As he works his way through a large stack of unopened mail, George sees a letter on expensive hotel stationary with a Swiss stamp. At first he does not recognize the handwriting. When he does, he feels slightly sick, his vision blurred, he scarcely has strength to open the envelope. What did she want? If it was money, Ann could have all he possessed. He had nothing else to give her--she had taken it long ago.

My darling George,

I want to make you an offer which no gentlemen could accept. I want to come back to you.

I'm staying at the Baur-au-Lac at Zurich till the end of the month. Let me know.

Ann.

George thought she was right. No gentleman could accept that offer. No dream could survive the stark reality of Ann's departure with her race car driver. That was Ann: Let me know. Redeem your life, see whether you can live it again, and let me know. I am tired of my lover, let me shatter your world again; my own bores me. I want to come back to you...I want, I want...

With the letter still in his hand, George got up and stood before the tiny Dresden figures. He remained there several minutes gazing at the little shepherdess. She was so beautiful.

A few days later George took the midnight plane to Zurich.

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post #104 of 109 Old 05-23-2012, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

George Smiley is perhaps my favorite literary character. At the risk of polluting the thread with unwanted detritus, I am going to append to this post an essay about George and his wife, the beautiful and elegant serial betrayer, Lady Ann. I hope that some of you enjoy it:

Thanks for that gwsat I enjoyed reading that it gave me more insight about Anne and George. Once a cheater always a cheater
Poor George, thing is there are people like George who believe in second chances.

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post #105 of 109 Old 05-23-2012, 10:46 AM
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I tried twice to watch this and I just couldn't get through it. I found it painfully, excruciatingly slow. I love Gary Oldman but I just can't make a go of this.

Kaboom.
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post #106 of 109 Old 05-23-2012, 11:10 AM
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Thanks for that gwsat I enjoyed reading that it gave me more insight about Anne and George. Once a cheater always a cheater
Poor George, thing is there are people like George who believe in second chances.

"Poor George" is right. The lovely and appealing, but treacherous, Lady Ann made George's life a living hell. One of the most moving scenes in the film came

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at the Christmas party when we see the stricken expression on George's face when he looks out of a window and sees Ann and Bill Haydon pawing each other in the garden.

I thought Oldman played it brilliantly.
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post #107 of 109 Old 05-23-2012, 01:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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"Poor George" is right. The lovely and appealing, but treacherous, Lady Ann made George's life a living hell. One of the most moving scenes in the film came

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
at the Christmas party when we see the stricken expression on George's face when he looks out of a window and sees Ann and Bill Haydon pawing each other in the garden.

I thought Oldman played it brilliantly.

That was the perfect look of "suspicions confirmed" just as his heart breaks in half no one could ever do it better.
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post #108 of 109 Old 05-23-2012, 04:20 PM
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"Poor George" is right. The lovely and appealing, but treacherous, Lady Ann made George's life a living hell. One of the most moving scenes in the film came

* SPOILER *
I thought Oldman played it brilliantly.

He certainly did at first
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when I saw her having a kiss with the so called stranger because it didn't show us who he was which created another mystery for us first time viewers. I figured it who he was when he went home and noticed the piece of wood removed I thought someone was there to kill him at first but seeing bill sitting there and then showing his feet half in his shoes I thought you bastard bill.

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post #109 of 109 Old 05-24-2012, 06:42 AM
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That was the perfect look of "suspicions confirmed" just as his heart breaks in half no one could ever do it better.

Throughout their lives together George wanted to trust Ann but knew he couldn't and wanted to forgive her for her transgressions, though he knew he shouldn't. This dichotomy was what moved me to write the essay about George and Ann in 1992, which I recently posted to this thread. I had read all of the LeCarre's Smiley books by the time I took up the first, Call For the Dead, in the early '90s. As noted in my essay, Call For the Dead goes into more detail about the Smileys than any of the subsequent books and it's all sad, very sad. Gary Oldman did a wonderful job in the film of showing us all of that.
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