Why are blu-rays still so expensive? - Page 16 - AVS Forum
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post #451 of 480 Old 10-23-2013, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles [Blu-ray] (2012) Price $12.48 & FREE Shipping
Amazon

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles DVD new $5.00 + shipping
Amazon

bet the origionl DVD was more than both of these together go figure.


I picked up Star Trek Into Darknesss BD/DVD combo at Amazon for $24.98
No DVD only availiable AFAIK Other sellers at Amazon have it for as low as $17.98
most however are ~$24.00 +

Star Trek (2009) BD only is $14.88 @ Amazon

Seems like BD prices vary just like DVD accounting for inflation from lets say the early 90's they might well average out cheaper all in all.

Most brand new DVD's were sold as loss leaders on release week by retailers. I picked up many day and date DVD releases for $12-14 brand new back in the heyday of Circuit City, Walmart, Best Buy, and Target duking it out. Stores were losing money on them to generate foot traffic and hope that customers bought other high markup items. We still see that today with Blu-Ray but it is hit or miss.

Digital is a whole different animal. Retailers can no longer set prices, the studio has control of pricing and loss leaders for digital movies make less sense since you are less likely to get people to throw other items in their cart (ie impulse shopping).
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post #452 of 480 Old 10-27-2013, 03:44 PM
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The preorder of the last season of Breaking Bad on Blu-ray is about $40 while the DVD set is around $30. I'm waiting until they're the same.

NOW: my post on AVS Forum.
NEXT: someone else's post on AVS Forum.
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post #453 of 480 Old 11-06-2013, 10:44 PM
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One thing that may indeed be causing new-release Blu-ray movies to cost more (and if this was already mentioned here, please forgive me): Are any new movies ever released in Blu-ray-ONLY versions? It seems that most of the ones I see are these combo packages with a DVD and "digital copy" all together. Well, whether most of us want those extras or not, they are included, and you can be sure that the studios are going to demand a higher price for these all-in-one sets.

For what it is worth, I vaguely remember in the early days of the HD DVD format, most "catalog" releases had a retail price of $25, and when new-release movies came out, they were always the "combo discs" with the DVD version on the back of the same disc-with a retail price of $40. People howled in complaint then at those high prices, too. Then, one new release came out that was NOT a combo disc (I think it was a George Clooney movie), and it was $30, still $5 more than all of the catalog releases.

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post #454 of 480 Old 11-07-2013, 01:28 PM
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frankly... I see BD price plummeting.

the end of physical media is nearer than many think.

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post #455 of 480 Old 11-07-2013, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by MSchu18 View Post

frankly... I see BD price plummeting.

the end of physical media is nearer than many think.

I think you're being a bit assumptive. Even if the format starts to dwindle it's not like it's going away any time soon. You'll still have a market for it and I might have to go to specific retailers/online to get my releases. I really doubt we'll see a total end to physical releases for quite awhile now. Too many variables working against that atm.
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post #456 of 480 Old 11-09-2013, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by ChrisW6ATV View Post

One thing that may indeed be causing new-release Blu-ray movies to cost more (and if this was already mentioned here, please forgive me): Are any new movies ever released in Blu-ray-ONLY versions? It seems that most of the ones I see are these combo packages with a DVD and "digital copy" all together. Well, whether most of us want those extras or not, they are included, and you can be sure that the studios are going to demand a higher price for these all-in-one sets.

For what it is worth, I vaguely remember in the early days of the HD DVD format, most "catalog" releases had a retail price of $25, and when new-release movies came out, they were always the "combo discs" with the DVD version on the back of the same disc-with a retail price of $40. People howled in complaint then at those high prices, too. Then, one new release came out that was NOT a combo disc (I think it was a George Clooney movie), and it was $30, still $5 more than all of the catalog releases.


I think it costs more to produce Blu-ray because of all the Licensing Fees and DRM, etc.

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post #457 of 480 Old 11-09-2013, 11:24 PM
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The Best Years of our Lives Blu-ray has an MSRP of $19.98.

In 1995, I paid $39.98 for the Pioneer Special Edition LaserDisc ($40.68 in 2013 dollars.)

I think Blu-rays are actually rather inexpensive - 1/3 the price and HD!
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post #458 of 480 Old 11-10-2013, 04:29 AM
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Quote:
 frankly... I see BD price plummeting.

the end of physical media is nearer than many think.

 

 

physical formats will never die imho, as a product theres more to films and music than just about the content.

 

the revival of vinyl is a testament to this.

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post #459 of 480 Old 11-10-2013, 08:10 AM
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physical formats will never die imho, as a product theres more to films and music than just about the content.



the revival of vinyl is a testament to this.


But vinyl is a format on what appears to be a stable base, and many (myself included) think this format itself provides value added. Videotapes break. Videotape recorders break. CDs, DVDs and Blu-rays are glued together and no one knows how long they can last (which suits the suits just fine). Laserdiscs are famously known to deteriorate.

And photographers now have to worry the fate of their digital body of work, as no storage seems to be archival, dooming them to constantly having to back their images up to more timely storage and hope they haven't missed anything.

And moviemakers are discovering even fairly recent color films have had their color degrade enormously. HIgh resolution VistaVision films cannot use the original high resolution negatives because the yellow has disappeared.

Very little seems to be permanent.

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post #460 of 480 Old 11-10-2013, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Shaded Dogfood View Post

physical formats will never die imho, as a product theres more to films and music than just about the content.



the revival of vinyl is a testament to this.



But vinyl is a format on what appears to be a stable base, and many (myself included) think this format itself provides value added. Videotapes break. Videotape recorders break. CDs, DVDs and Blu-rays are glued together and no one knows how long they can last (which suits the suits just fine). Laserdiscs are famously known to deteriorate.

And photographers now have to worry the fate of their digital body of work, as no storage seems to be archival, dooming them to constantly having to back their images up to more timely storage and hope they haven't missed anything.

And moviemakers are discovering even fairly recent color films have had their color degrade enormously. HIgh resolution VistaVision films cannot use the original high resolution negatives because the yellow has disappeared.

Very little seems to be permanent.

 

As a keen vinyl collector. i dont think the format is as stable as you might think. warping ? Scratching ?

VHS is also enjoying a nostalgic rebirth.

 

I have CDs pressed in 1988 and they play perfectly with no sign of deteriation.

 

but as you said nothing is permanent. 

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post #461 of 480 Old 11-10-2013, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by willkm79 View Post


I think it costs more to produce Blu-ray because of all the Licensing Fees and DRM, etc.

All those things are still costs with digital delivery. The only cost you actually save is manufacturing cost. Storage costs become Web site costs and "delivery" costs become bandwidth on the Web site costs... so you only save the paltry costs of manufacturing the physical media.

This is why you notice many digital format purchases are not significantly cheaper than physical media... and worse, with digital, the producer controls it all... no need to have resellers (retailers) so no need to have sales or discounts or "Clearance" sales... the price is the price is the price... forever if they want.

I sincerely hope we never see the end of physical media, and everyone else should hope this too!

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post #462 of 480 Old 11-11-2013, 08:49 AM
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I sincerely hope we never see the end of physical media, and everyone else should hope this too!
I'm with ye. And should it ever happen, I think I wouldn't feel the need to get them "legal" anymore. I never download any pirated movies even though it's still pretty easy. I buy them because I want to have a hard copy in nice packaging. If the only thing they're offering in the future is streaming, I'd prefer a source where I can download a copy to keep on my own Hard drive or burn to disc.

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post #463 of 480 Old 11-14-2013, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by LosMagandos View Post


physical formats will never die imho, as a product theres more to films and music than just about the content.

the revival of vinyl is a testament to this.

Despite the doom and gloom more classics are being put on BD which is how I judge if it is dying or not. Granted Best Buy, Futureshop and Walmart have greatly reduced the selection in Canada which is a bummer. Thank goodness for HMV.
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post #464 of 480 Old 11-14-2013, 07:28 PM
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Hard to predict anything with certainty but it's clear to see IMO DVD and probably Blue Ray will never be as dominant as VHS and DVD /CDR /Vinyl once were .Once the telcos flesh out their vacancies in broadband distribution with 4G and fibre .
.
Telcos are acquiring RF spectrum from traditional broadcasters and FCC to do just that as we speak . The resurgence of vinyl is a non starter just a trendy or nostalgic trend or enthusiast niche (your choice ) . 99% of my content consumption is ether Satellite or Broad band ,Netflix,Amazon Prime ,Dish net ,Hulu Rhapsody , and the occasional hi res download .
My DVD's and CD's are on the nas server . No question the discs will be around for awhile just not like they were.

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post #465 of 480 Old 11-15-2013, 02:31 AM
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Despite the doom and gloom more classics are being put on BD which is how I judge if it is dying or not. Granted Best Buy, Futureshop and Walmart have greatly reduced the selection in Canada which is a bummer. Thank goodness for HMV.

 

Im so glad HMV was saved here in the UK too ! The high street was gonna be just coffee shops and clothes retailers ! Yuck !!

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post #466 of 480 Old 11-15-2013, 02:36 AM
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also this is a great article -

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/dadehayes/2013/07/08/six-reasons-why-dvds-still-make-money-and-wont-die-anytime-soon/

 

Six Reasons Why DVDs Still Make Money -- And Won't Die Anytime Soon

 

During earnings season this spring, media company chiefs all touted quarterly growth in digital rentals and sales of movies and TV shows. They paused only briefly to shovel more dirt on the grave of the other part of the multi-billion-dollar home entertainment market: those so-last-decade little discs known as DVDs.

“It is definitely a more challenged business in terms of … the sell-through and rental of physical goods,” said Disney Chairman and CEO Bob Iger during a typical conference call with analysts in May. “But it’s been growing nicely on the digital front and I think that bodes well for the future.” Other executives simply ignored Wall Street’s questions about hard goods and rhapsodized about how the ones and zeroes were finally bringing in long-promised bucks.

Refreshingly forward-thinking for an industry not known for being so? Eminently logical given the explosion of digital platforms in recent years? Perhaps. But this stance is also disingenuous given that physical goods still make up about two-thirds of major studios’ total home entertainment revenue. Perhaps it’s simple human nature — few executives, especially those in an industry built on razzle-dazzle, enjoy dwelling on decaying parts of their business. They’d rather talk about the wave of tomorrow, regardless of how big or genuine the swell.

The decline of the DVD, let’s not sugarcoat it, has been significant. According to annual figures released in January by industry trade group the Digital Entertainment Group (note the name), overall home entertainment revenue grew 0.2% in 2012, surpassing $18 billion. Physical disc sales have fallen by about 30% since their 2004 peak, to some 700 million units, but the revenue picture has remained stable (with more than a decade of consecutive annual tallies of $18 billion-plus, the DEG says). The reason is diversification. Consumers remain hungry for content, but are finding more and more avenues to it — electronic sell-through (EST), subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) or transactional VOD has all amounted to the same pie, just sliced into more pieces. But the DVD is no more dead than the single-screen movie theatre or the network sitcom or the hardcover book — other former cash cows that now play a diminished but still vital role in the ecosystem.

 

 

I am here to say it is premature to pen the obituary of the oft-maligned DVD, onetime redeemer of flops, makers of careers and buoy of Hollywood during a meteoric 1999-2004 heyday. This wafer-thin, pocket-sized, data-rich slice of entertainment defies the usual narrative of obsolescence. It does not compare with the fraying, un-uploadable VHS tape or the cartoonishly oversized laserdisc. Unhip as it may be to point out, the humble disc serves a useful — and, yes, lucrative –purpose. After checking in with a range of industry leaders (not all of whom wanted to be identified given how their bosses characterize the marketplace) and putting my own thoughts together after covering the industry since the boom began, I am prepared to now make the optimistic case for the DVD. Not a bullish case in the sense of growth, clearly, but a prediction that these little silver objects will continue to matter to media companies for many years to come.

“In any forecast, physical goods will remain the largest piece,” Bill Clark, president of Anchor Bay Entertainment, told me. “It’s a very important revenue stream. There is no indication that digital is going to surpass physical. We need to grow the entire pie.”

Here are a handful of reasons, nearly a decade after the peak of DVD sales, why the physical slice of the pie will stay substantial:

 

1) Kids need it — Summer vacation season is well under way, and millions of parents are relearning this basic early childhood precept. Until automakers figure out how to make vehicles rolling wi-fi hotspots, airlines open the throttle on in-flight bandwidth, and online outlets decrease download times, watching movie and TV content on disc will remain the best way to travel. Plus, even at home, bonus features add more value to kids titles, as does packaging. It may be true that mobile devices and tablets are being used by kids at younger and younger ages, and that Netflix streaming has eroded linear viewing of Nickelodeon and other kids channels. But when it comes to home entertainment and long-term usage, DVD is simply a better value. Having shelled out three times for my kids to watch Parental Guidance on a tablet and home screen, I say bring on the Blu-ray (and hope it doesn’t get scratched).

 

2) The industry’s own marketing says so – UltraViolet, a cloud technology embraced by a broad consortium of distributors (notable holdouts include Disney), is selling the concept of multi-platform content access. That means if you buy a disc, you also get to access the digital copy, a “combo-pack” strategy that is now an industry cornerstone. The tables could soon turn, but the disc will stay in the picture. “In the future, you’re going to buy a digital copy and then get the disc as another way to view the content,” predicts Victor Elizalde, head of VIVA Pictures and a former studio exec.

 

3) Specialization favors it — Beyond the DEG data there are myriad distributors trafficking in a range of areas from sports to music to fitness to spiritualism — vast realms where the marketing opportunities and venues may be greater for physical discs than digital files. It’s easier to sell an official championship team DVD at supermarkets, gas stations and other retail outlets, for example, than an official championship download.

 

4) Blu-ray still the best viewing experience – For cinephiles or even anyone inclined in that direction, HD content viewed on the finest Retina tablet display or LCD flat screen can’t come close to a Blu-ray. Gaming platforms, such as the upcoming PlayStation 4 or just-released X-box, will continue to drive significant Blu-ray business. The rollout of Blu-ray has been a bit of a New Coke experience for Hollywood but after the smoke and disappointment has cleared it remains a superior format attracting all of the top content producers. “Working closely with the DEG, we’ll be launching a consumer awareness campaign about the merits of Blu-ray and UltraViolet,” says Anchor Bay’s Clark. “A lot of consumers don’t fully understand it.”

 

5) It’s the collector’s choice – If you were baffled by the format wars of a decade ago pitting Sony’s Blu-ray against Toshiba’s HD-DVD, the confusion around cloud storage is exponentially greater. The notion of a “digital storage locker,” as easily managed as one’s iTunes music library or Netflix account, has long been promoted by Hollywood (hence, UltraViolet). But there are an array of factors that will keep this concept from taking over and dominating. One is bandwidth — cloud DVRs are just now rolling out from MSOs like Comcast, and already there are questions about the cost and feasibility of bandwidth and storage. Old-school DVD collecting, while it involved an initial pricetag, didn’t get progressively more expensive the more you bought. Also, many players are cashing in on the demand for popular shows by creating packaging that lures hardcore fans. AMC’s blockbuster series Walking Dead sold out its run of 35,000 packages designed by McFarlane Toys. The price of this boxed set: $100. That’s a couple extra million right off the top.

 

6) For a lot of Americans, it ain’t broke – The media/industry narrative around the death of DVD and supremacy of digital doesn’t match the reality of most U.S. markets outside of New York, L.A., San Francisco and a small handful of other enclaves. Battered by recession and indifferent to aesthetics or the futuristic potential of cloud storage, they are happy to rent cheap discs from Redbox (whose kiosks outnumber McDonald’s and Starbucks outlets combined). As one major studio home entertainment confided to me, “There are a lot of Topeka, Kansases out there. And that’s a business we still need to be in.”

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post #467 of 480 Old 11-15-2013, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by LosMagandos View Post

Im so glad HMV was saved here in the UK too ! The high street was gonna be just coffee shops and clothes retailers ! Yuck !!

HMV has turned into a partial clothes retailer in Canada, mostly teeny stuff.
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post #468 of 480 Old 11-17-2013, 10:03 PM
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Thank you for posting that, LosMagandos.

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"It's [expletive] lame to watch Jaws, a film that uses the 2.40 ratio as well as any ever produced, in the wrong format on HBO." -Steven Soderbergh, Oscar-winning director

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post #469 of 480 Old 11-19-2013, 06:11 AM
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My concern is Video On Demand DVDs.
The quality of these discs vary greatly, but due to costs, studios are limiting their spend, especially in the classic/hard to find category.
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post #470 of 480 Old 11-19-2013, 07:15 AM
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There are still millions of people like me who do not have access to broadband with unlimited bandwidth. People like us need to rent or buy discs. Discs aren't going anywhere soon.
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post #471 of 480 Old 11-19-2013, 10:18 AM
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There are still millions of people like me who do not have access to broadband with unlimited bandwidth. People like us need to rent or buy discs. Discs aren't going anywhere soon.

Plus, the fact that DVD sales have dropped is offset by the fact that Blu-Ray continues to grow. And each holiday season, as more people get/receive new TVs and players, both BD and 3D will continue their gradual expansion into the home-entertainment market. The DVD may eventually vanish, but not Blu-Ray.

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post #472 of 480 Old 11-19-2013, 05:01 PM
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Oh I am not kidding myself, blu-ray has plateaued and dvds are not going away. Certainly not to save the BD format like the fantasy claimed which has been dispelled for a while now, nor are BDs going to make a big comeback in WM and BB store shelves.
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post #473 of 480 Old 11-19-2013, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by wuther View Post

Oh I am not kidding myself, blu-ray has plateaued and dvds are not going away. Certainly not to save the BD format like the fantasy claimed which has been dispelled for a while now, nor are BDs going to make a big comeback in WM and BB store shelves.

9/21/13 DVD sales down 13.1% from previous years' period. Blu-Ray sales up 24.2%

9/14/13 DVD sales down 15.8%, Blu_ray up 39.1%

(HOME MEDIA)

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post #474 of 480 Old 11-19-2013, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by wuther View Post

Oh I am not kidding myself, blu-ray has plateaued and dvds are not going away. Certainly not to save the BD format like the fantasy claimed which has been dispelled for a while now, nor are BDs going to make a big comeback in WM and BB store shelves.

Blu-ray appears to be already in decline. Although it is still up 6.3% this year (through 11/9), it is down 4.3% since the beginning of April. A format can only go against the wind (the decline in popularity of optical disc) so long before it is pushed back.
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post #475 of 480 Old 11-20-2013, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by bruceames View Post

Blu-ray appears to be already in decline. Although it is still up 6.3% this year (through 11/9), it is down 4.3% since the beginning of April. A format can only go against the wind (the decline in popularity of optical disc) so long before it is pushed back.

That's primarily due to content. Wait till after 4th quarter.

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post #476 of 480 Old 11-20-2013, 08:55 AM
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The box office value of releases is up this year over last, so even accounting for inflation the releases this year are very comparable. So it's not the content, just that optical disc in general continues to decline in popularity and Blu-ray is being dragged along with it.
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post #477 of 480 Old 11-20-2013, 02:04 PM
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The marginal cost to produce a Blu-Ray is probably about $1 -- or less.

The problem is rising content and other production costs on the entertainment side mean that if the demand and supply will allow for a higher price, then that is the price that will be charged.

In this case, you have a limited number of suppliers who can charge the AVERAGE COST instead of MARGINAL COST.

This post brought to you by a former economist. biggrin.gif
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post #478 of 480 Old 11-20-2013, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by cinema13 View Post

9/21/13 DVD sales down 13.1% from previous years' period. Blu-Ray sales up 24.2%

9/14/13 DVD sales down 15.8%, Blu_ray up 39.1%

(HOME MEDIA)

Percentages are meaningless, which why they are used instead of the more gloomy number of units sold.
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post #479 of 480 Old 11-20-2013, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by kucharsk View Post

The Best Years of our Lives Blu-ray has an MSRP of $19.98.
In 1995, I paid $39.98 for the Pioneer Special Edition LaserDisc ($40.68 in 2013 dollars.)I think Blu-rays are actually rather inexpensive - 1/3 the price and HD!

I think you mis-typed the price in 2013 dollars. I think you meant to type about $60 in 2013 dollars, meaning the BR was 1/3rd the price.
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post #480 of 480 Old 11-26-2013, 07:33 AM
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Thank you for posting that, LosMagandos.

 

No worries, My pleasure.

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