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Old 10-05-2013, 03:16 PM
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Did anyone ever figure out whether the 2D disc packaged with the 3D set is based on the restoration work done for 3D or is it just the recycled 70th anniversary disc?
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by jqmn View Post

Did anyone ever figure out whether the 2D disc packaged with the 3D set is based on the restoration work done for 3D or is it just the recycled 70th anniversary disc?

According to the Blu-ray.com review, it's just a recycled disc.
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Old 10-06-2013, 06:17 AM
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Thanx! But does go on to say you can watch this "restored again" version in 2D if you take the 3D disc, then turn off 3D on the player and the TV. Didn't know you could do that.
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Old 10-09-2013, 03:16 PM
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I read somewhere that both versions were new scans. I would be very interested to know if it was and did they fix the "windowboxing" of the opening credits suffered on the original blu ray release?

For the life of me I can't understand why manufacturers even do this during the age of flat panels? An educated guess tells me that it was necessary with CRT monitors because overscan could crop off credit names on films in the old "Academy" aspect ratio. In this age of 1:1 pixel mapping and even slightly "justified" ratios this would never happen. Annoying...
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:48 PM
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Windowboxing is there in both 3D and 2D versions. It would have actually been good if it was there when I saw it in IMAX. A fifth of the top of the top line of credits were cropped off.
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Old 10-10-2013, 04:56 AM
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Windowboxing is there in both 3D and 2D versions. It would have actually been good if it was there when I saw it in IMAX. A fifth of the top of the top line of credits were cropped off.

The IMAX format is wider than the Academy ratio so that would make sense. But I'm speaking of keeping the film entirely in the 1:33 to 1 ratio on bluray and not squeezing it even smaller during the opening credits. Its not needed with today's panels.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:54 AM
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I know that it isn't needed with today's flat panels.
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Old 10-10-2013, 11:08 AM
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I also hate windowboxed credits. It was explained to me that this is actually a legal requirement if the credit text extends to the edges of the frame, to ensure that no names are cut off due to TV overscan. This rule was instituted in the days when TV overscan was actually a concern, but was never amended to take zero-overscan flat panels into account. (It should be noted that even many flat panels have some degree of electronic overscan zooming turned on by default out of the box.) In cases like this, the studio is obligated to shrink the image size and windowbox it entirely within the "TV Safe" area of the frame.

The credits on most modern movies are positioned within the TV Safe area to take this into consideration, however that wasn't the case with many classic films. I believe the most recent movie I've seen with this issue is David Lynch's Lost Highway (1997). Foreign Blu-rays for that have windowboxed opening credits.

As I think about it, Stark Trek III and some of the James Bond movies from the '60s and '70s also have windowboxed credits.

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Old 10-10-2013, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

. It was explained to me that this is actually a legal requirement if the credit text extends to the edges of the frame, to ensure that no names are cut off due to TV overscan.

A shame that no such legality extends to the films themselves!

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Old 10-10-2013, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

I also hate windowboxed credits. It was explained to me that this is actually a legal requirement if the credit text extends to the edges of the frame, to ensure that no names are cut off due to TV overscan. This rule was instituted in the days when TV overscan was actually a concern, but was never amended to take zero-overscan flat panels into account. (It should be noted that even many flat panels have some degree of electronic overscan zooming turned on by default out of the box.) In cases like this, the studio is obligated to shrink the image size and windowbox it entirely within the "TV Safe" area of the frame.

The credits on most modern movies are positioned within the TV Safe area to take this into consideration, however that wasn't the case with many classic films. I believe the most recent movie I've seen with this issue is David Lynch's Lost Highway (1997). Foreign Blu-rays for that have windowboxed opening credits.

As I think about it, Stark Trek III and some of the James Bond movies from the '60s and '70s also have windowboxed credits.

I have noticed it with some of the James Bond films however I don't think those films are technically windowboxed during the credits. I believe those films (along with the opening credits of Spartacus) having the appearance of windowboxing has more to do with the varied presentation formats films in the 1960's and 70's might be presented in. The credits are filmed in the most standard format however if a local cinema was lucky enough to have a Super Panavision or 70mm print you were given the full aspect ratio.

I am hazing over the facts here A bit but I was fortunate enough to see the restored rerelease of Spartacus at the Fox Theater in Detroit during the early 90's and I remember the sustained aspect ratio to be more like the opening credits on the blu-ray (about 1:85). I believe this to be the SuperPanavision aspect ratio.
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Old 10-11-2013, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by brinyhenry View Post

I have noticed it with some of the James Bond films however I don't think those films are technically windowboxed during the credits. I believe those films (along with the opening credits of Spartacus) having the appearance of windowboxing has more to do with the varied presentation formats films in the 1960's and 70's might be presented in. The credits are filmed in the most standard format however if a local cinema was lucky enough to have a Super Panavision or 70mm print you were given the full aspect ratio.

Most of the Bond movies were shot on Panavision anamorphic 35mm. None were shot on large-format 65mm film like Spartacus. The opening credits on Thunderball, Moonraker and a couple others (The Spy who Loved Me, IIRC?) are horizontally squeezed on the Blu-rays. They maintain the same top and bottom framelines as the rest of the 2.35:1 movie, but are compressed so that the sides are pushed in with some pillarboxing. This is very obvious on Moonraker, where circular imagery (such as repeated shots of the moon) appears oval rather than round. If you go into the "007 Mission Control" section in the supplements, you can find text-free versions of the credit sequences in their original unsqueezed ratio.

The squeezed credits are very distracting on these discs, IMO.

The opening credits on Lost Highway are not squeezed. They're simply shrunken down with black bars on all sides (like Wizard of Oz).

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