2001: First impressions - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 06:27 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Club Gold
 
J.Mike Ferrara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 3,307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Pure Poetry in motion.

That's a poor attempt to describe this landmark movie. I was lucky to see it at least a dozen times at DC's Uptown Theater where it premiered. Shown in 70mm 6 channel stereo on the deeply curved Cinerama screen, to this very day it's the most visually breathtaking film I've ever seen, and the gold standard for what big format film can look like.

So last night I load up the Blu-ray version and kicked back to watch my favorite scenes. I know from memory how each scene must look, and in a few cases, this was achieved on my 100" screen. The scene when the apeman figures out how to use a bone as a weapon was always my favorite -I remember I had to hold on to the chair at the Uptown as the music swelled to a crescendo and the camera showed the fury in the apeman's face and actions growing, shot facing up from ground level.

And Blu-ray comes closer that any other format I've seen to reproducing the visual and sonic power of the 70mm presentation - but alas, close but no cigar. Frankly, the transfer is a mixed bag - some shots seemed dull and lifeless, others were rich, detailed, and full of depth. The sound quality is my biggest disappointment. In the roadshow presentation at the Uptown, five channels are behind the screen, and the side and rear speakers are used for effects. The action on the wide screen tracked perfectly, and the best use of the side/rear channels was HAL's voice. It was startling! All actor's voices were well placed on the screen, but HAL's voice seemed to come from everywhere. Unfortunately, this did not translate to the current remastered version for Blu-ray, and I assume HD-DVD. Also, the limitations of movie soundtrack recording in 1968 is quite apparent - very compressed and harsh in many scenes. The famous trip scene is particularly harsh, but the low frequency effects are powerful.

I guess I'll never again in my lifetime experience the sheer joy of watching this great classic movie presented in all it's roadshow glory.

Pity.

J.Mike
Those who die with the most toys ... are still dead!
J.Mike Ferrara is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 06:30 AM
Senior Member
 
dnbois56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 274
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
You really paint a picture-makes me wish I had gotten the chance to see it done right at a great theater. I feel the same way about Jaws and my parents never let me forget how they left me at home with a babysitter while they went and saw it opening weekend.
dnbois56 is offline  
post #3 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 06:32 AM
 
AaronSCH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 1,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.Mike Ferrara View Post

Prue Poetry in motion.

That's a poor attempt to describe this landmark movie. I was lucky to see it at least a dozen times at DC's Uptown Theater where it premiered. Shown in 70mm 6 channel stereo on the deeply curved Cinerama screen, to this very day it's the most visually breathtaking film I've ever seen, and the gold standard for what big format film can look like.

So last night I load up the Blu-ray version and kicked back to watch my favorite scenes. I know from memory how each scene must look, and in a few cases, this was achieved on my 100" screen. The scene when the apeman figures out how to use a bone as a weapon was always my favorite -I remember I had to hold on to the chair at the Uptown as the music swelled to a crescendo and the camera showed the fury in the apeman's face and actions growing, shot facing up from ground level.

And Blu-ray comes closer that any other format I've seen to reproducing the visual and sonic power of the 70mm presentation - but alas, close but no cigar. Frankly, the transfer is a mixed bag - some shots seemed dull and lifeless, others were rich, detailed, and full of depth. The sound quality is my biggest disappointment. In the roadshow presentation at the Uptown, five channels are behind the screen, and the side and rear speakers are used for effects. The action on the wide screen tracked perfectly, and the best use of the side/rear channels was HAL's voice. It was startling! All actor's voices were well placed on the screen, but HAL's voice seemed to come from everywhere. Unfortunately, this did not translate to the current remastered version for Blu-ray, and I assume HD-DVD. Also, the limitations of movie soundtrack recording in 1968 is quite apparent - very compressed and harsh in many scenes. The famous trip scene is particularly harsh, but the low frequency effects are powerful.

I guess I'll never again in my lifetime experience the sheer joy of watching this great classic movie presented in all it's roadshow glory.

Pity.

I don't think a home video experience could ever replace what you described. Regardless of how much money you have invested in your home theater. However, I skipped through 2001 last night and I was frankly blown away by the beaauty of the transfer. I guess I will reserve further comment until I sit down this weekend and experience the whole film again.
AaronSCH is offline  
post #4 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:30 AM
AVS Special Member
 
BigMikeATL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Marietta, GA, USA
Posts: 1,052
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
The big question is: Is there enough improvement over the remastered DVD to warranty buying this yet again?
BigMikeATL is offline  
post #5 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:32 AM
Senior Member
 
razel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 368
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I agree with others here that your comparing a well done theater presentation to home theater. Unless your home theater is similar to the theater setup, you may not get the same impact.

Regardless, I found the transfer to be great considering the age of the movie. The facial closeups have a lot of detail. During the ape scenes it's quite easy to see the projection background and it almost looks like a stage play. You can even notice what looks like brush strokes in the projections or waves and folds on whatever they're projecting on.

During the early space scene with the pen floating, what impressed me most was the dust. Kubrick was smart enough to turn the camera instead so that the dust in the air floats and follows what would happen in space.

I saw this movie as a kid on VHS fast forwarding most of it annoyed by the irry vocal music and bored, then later on laserdisc understanding it much more after reading a heady online synopsis. That laserdisc viewing was 10+ years ago. I skipped the DVD version and now I have completely appreciated it HD. Next I suppose would be at a theater as you described.

Until then, it's certainly the best presentation of 2001 I've seen and I'm finally gong to add it to my collection.

Off topic... my viewing of 2001 was an online rental from Blockbuster. Despite the disappointment from other about BB, kudos to them for getting it to me quickly.
razel is offline  
post #6 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:46 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
DavidHir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 10,428
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked: 431
Is the BD version devoid of edge enhancement? This plagued the last DVD.

DavidHir is online now  
post #7 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:57 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Club Gold
 
J.Mike Ferrara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 3,307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidHir View Post

Is the BD version devoid of edge enhancement? This plagued the last DVD.

OH YES. This was my greatest concern since I saw it on the HDNet broadcast. No EE at all. OTOH, I believe the transfer needs the full restoration frame-by-frame treatment. During the trip sequence, I saw a lot of emulsion issues - blacks changing color and fading in and out.

J.Mike
Those who die with the most toys ... are still dead!
J.Mike Ferrara is offline  
post #8 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:57 AM
Senior Member
 
arkiedan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: The Heartland of America
Posts: 208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.Mike Ferrara View Post

Prue Poetry in motion.

That's a poor attempt to describe this landmark movie. I was lucky to see it at least a dozen times at DC's Uptown Theater where it premiered. Shown in 70mm 6 channel stereo on the deeply curved Cinerama screen, to this very day it's the most visually breathtaking film I've ever seen, and the gold standard for what big format film can look like.

So last night I load up the Blu-ray version and kicked back to watch my favorite scenes. I know from memory how each scene must look, and in a few cases, this was achieved on my 100" screen. The scene when the apeman figures out how to use a bone as a weapon was always my favorite -I remember I had to hold on to the chair at the Uptown as the music swelled to a crescendo and the camera showed the fury in the apeman's face and actions growing, shot facing up from ground level.

And Blu-ray comes closer that any other format I've seen to reproducing the visual and sonic power of the 70mm presentation - but alas, close but no cigar. Frankly, the transfer is a mixed bag - some shots seemed dull and lifeless, others were rich, detailed, and full of depth. The sound quality is my biggest disappointment. In the roadshow presentation at the Uptown, five channels are behind the screen, and the side and rear speakers are used for effects. The action on the wide screen tracked perfectly, and the best use of the side/rear channels was HAL's voice. It was startling! All actor's voices were well placed on the screen, but HAL's voice seemed to come from everywhere. Unfortunately, this did not translate to the current remastered version for Blu-ray, and I assume HD-DVD. Also, the limitations of movie soundtrack recording in 1968 is quite apparent - very compressed and harsh in many scenes. The famous trip scene is particularly harsh, but the low frequency effects are powerful.

I guess I'll never again in my lifetime experience the sheer joy of watching this great classic movie presented in all it's roadshow glory.

Pity.

I got quite a kick out of hearing about your visits to the Uptown. It brought back a lot of pleasant memories from when I lived in Silver Spring. I saw 2001 three times at the Uptown, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad , Mad World a couple times, and the original, which was titled just "Cinerama" if I'm not mistaken.

I would guess the print the new DVD is from was the "normal" theatrical release, not the one requiring those three synchronized projectors. Remember the slight (sometimes not so slight) color and resolution variations between the three "segments" on the screen. The massive widescreen in those Cinerama theaters was something we'll never duplicate in our home theaters, no matter how large and complex.

Thanks for bringing back those memories.

arkiedan (now living in Arkansas! )
arkiedan is offline  
post #9 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 10:02 AM
AVS Special Member
 
dbburns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,811
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked: 39
Ah yes, the Uptown. My absolute favorite place to see a movie on those rare occasions when I venture out to the theater. I can't imagine that many home theaters would be able to recreate it. I still remember sitting in the balcony watching Twister and being truly frightened by the screamingly deafening wind sounds enveloping me. Good times. My roommate refuses to go there with me since he always complains they play their audio too loud there. I love it. Living in a townhome, I can't play my audio as loud as I would like.

I can imagine 2001 must have been a sight and a sound to behold in its day.

Xbox/PS/WiiU gamertag: GoNats
Apple Game Center: iGoNats

dbburns is offline  
post #10 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 10:17 AM
Advanced Member
 
slksc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Posts: 618
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I'm anxious to see this on BD. I have the regular DVD, and it's full of major visual artifacts, especially in the high contrast space scenes. It's disappointing that the audio may not be reference level: this is a film that cries for an excellent audio presentation.
slksc is offline  
post #11 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 10:45 AM
Senior Member
 
razel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 368
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by slksc View Post

It's disappointing that the audio may not be reference level: this is a film that cries for an excellent audio presentation.

You won't be disappointed with the detailed audio. The crescendos during the scores are clear and when HAL's voice kicks in you can hear the increase in hiss. Dunno if this is due to the mixing or an intentional artistic decision to remind us that he's artifical. Also there is a constant rumbling bass during the 10 minute acid trip sequence. Enough time for you to reach for the remote and turn up the subwoofer level.

The DD track is 448k, not 640k as if that makes much difference and is more likely just a case of Warner being a little lazy since 2001 is also available on HD-DVD with it's 448k DD limit. The DD track seemed to be just as detailed, but had more subtle sibliance. How much you'll hear will depend on how loud and how well your speakers and ears are.
razel is offline  
post #12 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 11:14 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Club Gold
 
J.Mike Ferrara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 3,307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by arkiedan View Post

I got quite a kick out of hearing about your visits to the Uptown. It brought back a lot of pleasant memories from when I lived in Silver Spring. I saw 2001 three times at the Uptown, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad , Mad World a couple times, and the original, which was titled just "Cinerama" if I'm not mistaken.

I would guess the print the new DVD is from was the "normal" theatrical release, not the one requiring those three synchronized projectors. Remember the slight (sometimes not so slight) color and resolution variations between the three "segments" on the screen. The massive widescreen in those Cinerama theaters was something we'll never duplicate in our home theaters, no matter how large and complex.

Thanks for bringing back those memories.

arkiedan (now living in Arkansas! )

Thanks for your post. 2001 was shot with one 70mm camera with an anamophic lens to compensate for the curved screen. I always thought it was true Cinerama, but found out a number of years ago that Cinerama had dropped the 3 camera setup in the early 1960's because of excessive production costs. Remember, Michael Todd's TODD-AO used one camera with the big "bug eyed" lens as well. Nevertheless, it was glorious! I will forever search for that experience in my own home. I hope to live long enough that the technology becomes effective and reasonable; I expect at least 10-20 years.

J.Mike
Those who die with the most toys ... are still dead!
J.Mike Ferrara is offline  
post #13 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 12:23 PM
AVS Special Member
 
bladerunner7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: san diego california
Posts: 1,346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
no contest here, BR is the BEST I have ever seen, except in the theater which was more than one time....but its a bargain and must have on BR..thanks warner...you did this one RIGHT
bladerunner7 is offline  
post #14 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 06:01 PM
Advanced Member
 
Vincent Pereira's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
Posts: 519
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.Mike Ferrara View Post

Thanks for your post. 2001 was shot with one 70mm camera with an anamophic lens to compensate for the curved screen...

2001 was not shot with anamorphic lenses. It was shot in Super Panavision 70, a spherical lens format. If it had used anamorphics combined with 70mm it would have the super-wide 2.76:1 aspect ratio of an anamorphic 70mm film like BEN-HUR.

Vincent
Vincent Pereira is offline  
post #15 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 06:06 PM
 
Robert George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Trapped in time. Surrounded by evil. Low on gas.
Posts: 3,768
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:


The DD track is 448k, not 640k as if that makes much difference and is more likely just a case of Warner being a little lazy since 2001 is also available on HD-DVD with it's 448k DD limit.

Warner, nor any other studio, uses standard Dolby Digital on HD DVD.
Robert George is offline  
post #16 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 07:08 PM
Member
 
iggytx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
This movie is a definite upgrade from the previous SDVD releases. If you like this movie I would highly recommend it.
iggytx is offline  
post #17 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 07:10 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Adam_ME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: H-Town, TX
Posts: 1,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMikeATL View Post

The big question is: Is there enough improvement over the remastered DVD to warranty buying this yet again?

Definitely! I A-B'd the remastered DVD and the Blu-ray version and there's no comparison. Easily the best this movie has ever looked on home video.

And the amount of extras on the disc are insane. That's reason enough to upgrade if you're a fan. Plus the PCM audio was an obvious improvement over the DD 5.1 track(448kbps).
Adam_ME is offline  
post #18 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:02 PM
Senior Member
 
t_tringle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Naperville, IL
Posts: 284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
hidefdigest.com has a review up of The Shining and according to them, the BLU-RAY and HD-DVD versions of that movie have the same video encode. Most likely if this is true then all of the re-released Kubrick films will have the same video encodes on both formats.

The only differences so far (although none of the others have been reviewed completely yet) are the audio formats. TrueHD on the HD-DVD versions and Uncompressed PCM on the BR versions.

I am waiting to confirm if all of these movies are sharing the same video encode before I choose the BR version over the HD-DVD version due to the fact that I don't yet have a receiver that has HDMI yet. The 360 HD-DVD addon that I use converts to DTS 1.5MB so the TRUE-HD is usually my choice since it's the highest bitrate audio I can enjoy at the moment.

If anybody can confirm that the BLU-RAY version of 2001 has a different video encode than the HD-DVD version I would be interested as that would most likely then change which version i will purchase.

TimT

"This is my BOOMSTICK!!!"
Ash, AOD
t_tringle is offline  
post #19 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 09:55 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Jedi2016's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,457
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 49
Warner always uses identical encodes on both formats.

Welcome to Rivendell, Mister Anderson.
Jedi2016 is offline  
post #20 of 347 Old 10-24-2007, 11:09 PM
Advanced Member
 
Paul Cordingley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 725
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert George View Post

Warner, nor any other studio, uses standard Dolby Digital on HD DVD.

I believe you need to put the word "Neither" at the start of that sentence

Cheers,
Paul Cordingley
Paul Cordingley is offline  
post #21 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 04:11 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Club Gold
 
J.Mike Ferrara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 3,307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent Pereira View Post

2001 was not shot with anamorphic lenses. It was shot in Super Panavision 70, a spherical lens format. If it had used anamorphics combined with 70mm it would have the super-wide 2.76:1 aspect ratio of an anamorphic 70mm film like BEN-HUR.

Vincent

Understood. Then how did they present a flat image on a deeply curved screen without distortion. If you look at the space station scene, off to the the edge, the receptionist looks distorted. Cinerama Corp must have made special lenses for one camera "Cinerama" features.

J.Mike
Those who die with the most toys ... are still dead!
J.Mike Ferrara is offline  
post #22 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 04:56 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Art Sonneborn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Battle Creek,MI USA
Posts: 22,307
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMikeATL View Post

The big question is: Is there enough improvement over the remastered DVD to warranty buying this yet again?

Yes,without a doubt not even close.

Art

My HT


iRule rules my theater
 

"If she's amazing she won't be easy,if she's easy she won't be amazing"

 

Bob Marley

Art Sonneborn is online now  
post #23 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 05:03 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Art Sonneborn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Battle Creek,MI USA
Posts: 22,307
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by razel View Post

I saw this movie as a kid on VHS fast forwarding most of it annoyed by the irry vocal music and bored, then later on laserdisc understanding it much more after reading a heady online synopsis. That laserdisc viewing was 10+ years ago. I skipped the DVD version and now I have completely appreciated it HD. Next I suppose would be at a theater as you described.

Until then, it's certainly the best presentation of 2001 I've seen and I'm finally gong to add it to my collection.

Mike I never had such a great opportunity as you have as an adult but the HDM presentation was wonderful as far as I am concerned.










My HT


iRule rules my theater
 

"If she's amazing she won't be easy,if she's easy she won't be amazing"

 

Bob Marley

Art Sonneborn is online now  
post #24 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 06:31 AM
AVS Special Member
 
John Ballentine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Los Angeles, Ca.
Posts: 5,084
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
OK. I give up. What does HDM stand for? High Def Media? (acronym finder says "Hot Dark Matter, House Dust Mite or Help Desk Manager"

GREAT pics by the way!
John Ballentine is offline  
post #25 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 07:49 AM
Senior Member
 
t_tringle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Naperville, IL
Posts: 284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Art,

Did you capture those screens yourself or are they linked in from somewhere. If you did capture them, how did you do so?

Not looking for piracy as much as just interested in how you were able to get those screenshots.

Thanks

TimT

"This is my BOOMSTICK!!!"
Ash, AOD
t_tringle is offline  
post #26 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 07:59 AM
Member
 
incubus0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Baldwinville MA
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam_ME View Post

Definitely! I A-B'd the remastered DVD and the Blu-ray version and there's no comparison. Easily the best this movie has ever looked on home video...

Did the same thing last night and noticed some color differences too. In the ape sequence, the earlier remastered DVD had a heavy yellow look, while this new HD one is much whiter.

Also, did you notice the last scene, in the room? The detail looks like it was shot in HD, amazing picture quality.
incubus0 is offline  
post #27 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 12:00 PM
Member
 
mazzer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 142
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hmm, I've never read anywhere that 2001 was shot for projection on a curved screen. My understanding is that the Cinerama term no longer implied any kind of curved screen (neither 3 elements or 1) but was just used as branding for 70mm productions by the time 2001 was made.

My guess is that the edge distortion on some shots is simply the effect of wide-angle lenses. Still, I'm curious if anyone can provide links to official references that can clarify this.
mazzer is offline  
post #28 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 12:30 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Club Gold
 
J.Mike Ferrara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 3,307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 16
mazzer, et all: Here are some facts I found:

Quote:


2001 began life as the short story The Sentinel, written by Arthur C. Clarke in 1950.

Clarke and Kubrick, who had been introduced by a mutual friend, began collaborating on a screenplay about man and extraterrestrials. Clarke suggested they base it on that story, which detailed a surveying expedition finding an alien artifact buried on the moon.

Clarke later wrote a novel based on the screenplay for 2001, which was released in July 1968, three months after the film’s debut.

After seeing a documentary entitled To the Moon and Beyond at the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Kubrick hired one of its special effects technicians, Douglas Trumbull, to work on 2001.

Although released in Cinerama, 2001 was not shot with three cameras but with one camera on 70mm film with a special anamorphic lens to widen the image.

Dr. Haywood Floyd’s daughter, seen on the videophone asking for a "bush baby," was played by Kubrick’s five-year-old daughter Vivian.

The HAL-9000 computer originally was named Athena and was supposed to have a female voice.

British actor Nigel Davenport and American actor Martin Balsam both recorded HAL’s dialogue before Kubrick eventually settled on Douglas Rain as the computer’s calm, rational voice.

The name HAL is an amalgam of "heuristic" and "algorithmic," the two main processes of learning.

With the exception of two baby chimpanzees, all of the apes in the beginning of the film were played by mimes, dancers and actors in costumes.

All of the "Dawn of Man" scenes, except for "Moonwatcher" demolishing the tapir skeleton with a bone, were shot on an indoor set using an elaborate front projection system created especially for the film.

The main Discovery set was built by aircraft manufacturer Vickers-Armstrong inside a 12-meter by two-meter drum designed to rotate at five km per hour. It cost $750,000.

Composer Alex North, who worked with Kubrick on Spartacus, wrote and recorded 40 minutes of original music that carried the film from the beginning up to the moon expedition. However, Kubrick later decided to use prerecorded classical music for the film.

Kubrick cut 19 minutes from the film’s original 158-minute running time after its New York premiere, mostly to speed up the pacing.

The film cost $10.5 million, a large sum at the time, but grossed over $21 million in its initial release, making it one of the studio’s biggest hits.
Kubrick earned Academy Award® nominations for Best Director and Best Screenplay, and won his only Oscar® for Best Special Visual Effects. The film also received a nomination for Best Art Direction.

And from Wikipedia:
Quote:


The film's world premiere was on April 2, 1968, at the Uptown Theater in Washington, D.C.. Kubrick deleted 19 minutes from the film just before the film's general release on 6 April 1968. It was released in 70mm format, with a six-track stereo magnetic soundtrack, and projected in the 2.21:1 aspect ratio. In autumn 1968, it was generally released in 35mm anamorphic format, with either a four-track magnetic stereo soundtrack or an optical monaural soundtrack.

The original 70 mm release was advertised as Cinerama in cinemas equipped with special projection optics and a deeply curved screen. In standard cinemas, the film was identified as a 70 mm production.


J.Mike
Those who die with the most toys ... are still dead!
J.Mike Ferrara is offline  
post #29 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 01:26 PM
Senior Member
 
samdu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Is this version remastered since the debut on HDNet Movies? Because I was blown away at that version even over a highly compressed MPEG2 stream over DirecTV. In fact, that version was what had me so excited about a Blu-Ray release. And compared to 2010, 2001 looked like they used some sort of magic to create it.
samdu is offline  
post #30 of 347 Old 10-25-2007, 01:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
bladerunner7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: san diego california
Posts: 1,346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
saw it for a second time this afternoon, wow a lot of detail I missed on the first viewing..the film has held up SO well even 6 years AFTER 2001. The detail of haywood on the shuttle was amazing and I think so far this is the best hi-def release of the year...I understand it might be in short supply..get it NOW...you wont be sorry.
bladerunner7 is offline  
Reply Blu-ray Software

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off