HD Video versus HD Film, why a difference? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 37 Old 03-21-2007, 02:22 PM
 
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Fair enough, and certainly no need to apologize. FWIW this topic is highly debated, and the position put forward by TV Technology is echoed often.. and even on this very forum as well.

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post #32 of 37 Old 03-23-2007, 10:57 AM
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Genesis CCD is the same size as a 35mm motion picture filmback, it uses standard spherical 35mm motion picture lenses.

You can shoot 35mm with depth of field that extends to infinity , its entirely at the control of the director given enough available light in pretty much the same way it is with a digital solution.

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post #33 of 37 Old 04-06-2007, 01:29 PM
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This month's American Cinematographer has an excellent article on the making of Zodiac, which used Viper cams and an uncompressed digital workflow. They discuss differences between film and digital, amongst many other things.

http://www.ascmag.com/magazine_dynam...diac/page1.php

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post #34 of 37 Old 04-07-2007, 05:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Yes ...which is certainly why I didn't mention it was video although It may have appeard that way. Hey do you remember when ER did that show live where they filmed at 30fps and people didn't like the "feel".

From memory that ER was shot 60i - which whilst technically can be described as 30fps (if the f stands for frames) - it doesn't have the same motion rendition as 30fps fim. This is because 60i captures 60 images a second, not 30, it just only transmits half resolution versions of each of these 60 images.

If you compare 60i with 24p you are getting more than twice as many images per second, giving a much smoother, realistic and fluid motion rendition, giving it a much more "real" look.

60i video shot with a neutral colour balance (or slightly saturated) can have an immensely powerful "looking through a window" feel - but it is a "look" associated with live TV, sports, news, entertainment and low cost soap production (and low budget sit coms of the past) - so many people dislike it.

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I notice that I've grown accustomed to the 24p "smear" that everyone else has and while I'm fine with sports being fluid ...moves look a bit strange when they're filmed the same way.


Ironically we had the reverse backlash in the UK with our ER equivalent - "Casualty". This has been running since the mid-80s, and has always been shot on 50i video rather than 25fps film. The "video" probably gives it an authenticity and feeling of "reality" that ties in with its (once gritty, now more soapy) storylines.

In the late 90s/early 00s a new Executive producer decided to alter the post-production workflow to add a 50i to 25p "film effect" process to give it a "filmic" look. The BBC were deluged with complaints about the change - and droppped the processing very quickly - before they hit mid-season. When they recently trialled HD production on the sister show to Casualty, "Holby City", this was also done at 50i (1080/50i) not 25p.

(The BBC have had public complaints about picture quality before. When Dallas moved from film to VT post and we started getting poor quality video conversions rather than high quality film transfers we'd previously had, the BBC Viewer Feedback programme "Points of View" - which airs comments from the audience about BBC programmes - was deluged. It was one of the driving forces for the very quick development of DEFT 60i to 48i 3:2 pull-down removal converters being developed)
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post #35 of 37 Old 04-07-2007, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimP View Post

I've heard that some of the advanced HD Video cameras made by Sony allows the user to select the "look" they want. They can make the recording look like grainy film if they so want it to.

If you know what you are doing this has been possible with colour cameras since the 1970s - but you have to know what you are doing - as there are LOTs of tweaks that do different things.

The BBC shot costume drama on Fernseh tubed lightweight video cameras in the late 1970s - and the Vision Supervisors on these productions were able to deliver a very nice looking "look" to the production that wasn't as "harsh" as some other video productions. These techniques were used to give video drama throughout the 1980s and 1990s a "look" that wasn't what you'd instantly imagine from video - and combined with the right filters allowed shows to have a "feel" of their own. BBC Childrens drama in particular were keen on this - and got good results.

Since the advent of digital in-camera processing it has been possible to save fixed "set-ups" to memory stick, and many camcorders now have similar levels of tweaks to their relatives in the system/cabled camera world (where they are remotely controlled from a CCU in the studio gallery or OB truck) However until quite recently these cards weren't entirely reliable and didn't guarantee identical looks - as some tweaks were independent of the digital processing and altered the way the settings were applied.

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As to video being shot uncorrected (enter big laugh), you should have seen what it looked like before they corrected it "in camera".

Indeed - though if you are shooting for later grading to apply a "look" in post production rather than "in camera" - you do shoot differently, often underexposing, and applying minimal aperture correction, and shooting with as neutral a colour balance as possible.
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post #36 of 37 Old 06-10-2014, 07:53 PM
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Sorry i have to disagree Miami CSI is not shot on Film,but in HD with the Arri Alexa witch is a " top notch " video camera

the preferred choice when wanting a film look , beside is has also many other  setting for creative . This Camera is used in many

Hollywood feature and TV show . To learn more go  www.panavisioon.com .

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post #37 of 37 Old 06-10-2014, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColetteGuimond View Post

Sorry i have to disagree Miami CSI is not shot on Film,but in HD with the Arri Alexa witch is a " top notch " video camera
the preferred choice when wanting a film look , beside is has also many other  setting for creative . This Camera is used in many
Hollywood feature and TV show . To learn more go  www.panavisioon.com .
I don't know why we are dragging up a 7 year old dead thread. But... Season 1-7 of CSI:Miami were shot on 35mm Kodak Film. HDCAM SR (1080p/24) wasn't brought in until season 8. And CSI is still shot on 35mm film.

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