Paradigm PDR-8 subwoofer HELP!! - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 10-20-2008, 07:30 PM - Thread Starter
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My Paradigm PDR-8 v2 subwoofer started making noise. After investigating I found the problem. The center part of the woofer has partially detached itself. I guess the glue has dried over the past few years. My question is can this be re-glued. If yes what kind of glue do I use? Would it be better to remove it completely then glue it back? Or is it scrap now..

thanks in advance for your help
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-20-2008, 08:29 PM
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Have you called Paradigm, or contacted your dealer? You bought a retail product it should be backed by the dealer and manufacturer. You should not have to DIY service the product on your own.

Regards,
Dan
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-20-2008, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by NEO Dan View Post

Have you called Paradigm, or contacted your dealer? You bought a retail product it should be backed by the dealer and manufacturer. You should not have to DIY service the product on your own.

It may be out of warranty. Most commercial subwoofers carry only a 2-5 year warranty on the driver. If still within warranty, certainly, contact the dealer from which you purchased it, or the manufacturer.

If out of warranty, here's what I would suggest, if you don't want to spend money to buy a new woofer from Paradigm. Remove the dust cap completely, but gently. If it's partially detached already, the rest of it should come off without too much trouble. Then re-glue it to the cone. To do this, follow these steps:

1. Take a short piece of 1" wide masking tape (or painter's tape - anything which can be removed relatively easily) and fold it into a T, with the top part of the T being sticky and the sides not. So basically, fold it in half and take the open end apart. Then stick it to the center of the dust cap, making a nice 'handle'.

2. Apply a small bead of glue underneath the entire perimeter of the dust cap's outer edge. Woofer rebuilders use a special concoction, but Elmer's standard white glue will do the trick when that isn't available.

3. Place dust cap on center of woofer cone and let dry, then remove the tape.
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post #4 of 9 Old 10-21-2008, 04:34 PM - Thread Starter
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would contact cement be a better choice. I though elmers glue would become brittle after time???
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-21-2008, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by cyberspy66 View Post

would contact cement be a better choice. I though elmers glue would become brittle after time???

Contact cement or rubber cement will work. However, both can be more tricky to apply in a smooth and relatively small bead around the dust cap, compared to white glue from a bottle.
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-21-2008, 06:58 PM
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Epoxy it.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-22-2008, 12:20 PM
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When I've purchased replacement surround kits, they have always come with a tube of white "Elmer's-like" glue. This has worked well on the surrounds and should work equally well on the dust cap.

pete
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-22-2008, 06:32 PM
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It'll definately impact the mass of the cone and it'll mess with the frequency response. you should simulate it on other drivers to see if the difference is significant enough. The moving mass will go up 5 grams or so.

I'ld contact paradigm and ask for their advise on the matter. If they're good ppl they'll tell you weather repairing it yourself is a bad idea or not.
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-23-2008, 06:22 AM
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Adding a mere 4-6 grams to the moving mass will have very little effect of the overall sound.This is a sub,even a small sub driver where the moving assembly only weighs ~90 gr will not be affected much by ~5 gr of added weight. And when the glue is applied properly it is under 2 gr or so.

A non issue and only an imaginary one.

This is not a tweeter where one gram will shift the fs and change the frequency response drastically.

Ask yourself mortal , do you have as much displacement as me ? The answer is no unless you have a Windmere fan sub.
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