Are Ryobi One+ tools any good for DIY - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 27 Old 11-27-2008, 07:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Tomorrow Home Depot is having a sale on Ryobi One+ tools and I was wondering if these tools are decent enough for building some DIY subs and speakers. The specific package I am looking at comes with a drill, circular saw, jigsaw and other tools for $60. Here is the link to all their One+ stuff.

http://www.ryobitools.com/promo/
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post #2 of 27 Old 11-27-2008, 10:27 PM
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I had a Ryobi 18v cordless drill for almost 10 years until it gave up the ghost this summer. I think it was the battery that died not the drill. The one+ is comparable to what I had, I believe the batteries were interchangeable too.

When I was looking for a replacement I looked at the newer one+ and just didn't like them. They don't feel as solid as my old Ryobi. I ended up going with a Dewalt DC720 18v which is worlds better than my old Ryobi.

The 339-208 kit for 109 is a hard deal to pass up though. Especially when you get an additional tool for free.

If you are just starting out I think this would be a good starter kit. If it lasts anywhere near as long as my old Ryobi drill did then you will have gotten a deal.

The only thing else I could add: you get what you pay for, don't go under 14v, don't buy something you're never going to use.

-Sean
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post #3 of 27 Old 11-27-2008, 10:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badahab View Post

I had a Ryobi 18v cordless drill for almost 10 years until it gave up the ghost this summer. I think it was the battery that died not the drill. The one+ is comparable to what I had, I believe the batteries were interchangeable too.

When I was looking for a replacement I looked at the newer one+ and just didn't like them. They don't feel as solid as my old Ryobi. I ended up going with a Dewalt DC720 18v which is worlds better than my old Ryobi.

The 339-208 kit for 109 is a hard deal to pass up though. Especially when you get an additional tool for free.

If you are just starting out I think this would be a good starter kit. If it lasts anywhere near as long as my old Ryobi drill did then you will have gotten a deal.

The only thing else I could add: you get what you pay for, don't go under 14v, don't buy something you're never going to use.

-Sean

Is there anything in particular you would recommend that will not break the bank? I already have a decent drill so I am mostly looking for a type of saw to cut the sheets of wood and a tool to make the circles.
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post #4 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 12:46 AM
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I hate jigsaws and avoid them like the plauge. Get a circle cutter attachment for your drill, or a router with a circle cutting guide.

In your budget I'd recommend the circular saw and circle cutter. And save up for a router, they're very handy.

PS this is what i mean by a circle cutter attachment for your drill:

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post #5 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 01:24 AM
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At one of the Australian wide Company's my family owns (Tool Supplies) When I used to repair industrial tools and all tradesmen air & electric tools inc Dewalt, Elu, makita, bosch, fein, festo, milwaukee, AEG, atlas copco, The list goes on....

I stopped dealing with RYOBI because it just wasnt made to be repaired IE: ryobi planers instead you throw it away , Years ago Ryobi was OK quality wise but now it is rubbish as far as quality goes....

But if you only use say A battery drill for home duty/DIY ryobi is fine. The main thing to remember when it comes to battery tools such as ryobi and other cheap battery tools is the battery AH rating is fairly low say 1.5AH and the cell's used in such tools are of lower quality, also the charger is normaly A lower quality wall wort type prone to fail if left on for long durations.... The battery quality is every thing in these types of tools as far as the life of the tool is concerned....

Hope this helps Cheers....
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post #6 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 02:49 AM
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I like my Ryobi 18v tools. They might not be the BEST but I think they are a great value. I've dropped my drill 10+ feet onto a 6" concrete slab twice and it survived with barely a scratch! I say go for it...

Dr V
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post #7 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 03:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gooki View Post

I hate jigsaws and avoid them like the plauge. Get a circle cutter attachment for your drill, or a router with a circle cutting guide.

In your budget I'd recommend the circular saw and circle cutter. And save up for a router, they're very handy.

PS this is what i mean by a circle cutter attachment for your drill:

I really like my jigsaw for all kinds of things, and have cut many a woofer or other cabinet hole with them. That said, I do prefer the circle cutter as pictured above. However, I feel obligated to note that the style pictured above should only be used on a drill press, never on a hand-held drill. They work excellently in a drill press. In fact, I just used mine this week to cut ten beautiful circles. If you want to use it with a hand-held drill however, you will need a style of circle cutter that comes with a stabilizing base (which also acts as a shield). There are many available, but they are considerably more expensive than the other type. Here's just one, they can go up to over $100 though:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=98001

I am using the $5.99 cutter from Harbor Freight, which looks more or less identical to the one above. It gets the job done, but protests a lot and just is not very smooth in operation, nor all that easy to adjust. I think I'll look for a much higher quality one - you get what you pay for. I have found that oddly, the single blade ones seem to work better. Anyhow...

A router is a great tool, though I would say for speaker building, I have only used them for decorative edges or for recessed holes. My Ryobi plunge router is still going strong after about 11 years. I had it fixed for $50 (half what I paid for it) about seven years ago when the shaft lock broke, because it just felt better in my hands than anything else. The Ryobi corded drill I had, on the other hand, wasn't that good at all. The motor burned up after only a couple years.

If you're looking for a tool to 'cut the sheets of wood', you would seem to be looking for a table saw. Now, I've gotten by without one because I have Lowe's/Home Depot cut sheets to the size I needed - or at least small enough to fit in my car. They don't even charge for that service anymore. However, I also have a sliding compound miter saw, which will crosscut up to 12" wide boards, and I have a Skilsaw (circular saw) to cut larger sheets. The only things which can really compare to a table saw when cutting sheet goods is a panel saw ($$$$ - like what they use at Lowes/HD), or a Radial Arm Saw.

All that said, if you don't have much space and cost is a concern, you can get a fine circular saw for not much money, which can give very accurate cuts with a little bit of preparation.
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post #8 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 06:25 AM
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Cool thread guys! I have a question though. I also have a cheap table saw but it does the job. However, what are some techniques that I can apply so that I can get a straight line cut if wood is 8' long
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post #9 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 06:50 AM
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Try a Bosch jigsaw and your aversion to jigsaws will most likely disappear.

I improved my circle cutter by replacing the HS cutter with a carbide tipped tool bit intended for use in a metal lathe. They come in sizes from 1/4" and up only, try Enco or Grizzly for one suited to your circle cutter.


http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...d/RipCirc.html

Has instructions for a simple, easy to make. accurate rip sled for a circular saw.
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post #10 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinculum View Post

I like my Ryobi 18v tools. They might not be the BEST but I think they are a great value.

I have to agree. I have a quite a few of them, and none of the "tools" has broken down on me. I did buy a cordless trimmer that used the 18v batteries that was crap, but other than that, the tools have been fine considering the price. I like the fact that their lithium batteries are the same form factor as the ni-cads, so you aren't forced into buying new tools if you want to upgrade to lithium.

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post #11 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 07:45 AM
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I got the Ryobi One+ set last year and it has worked well for me. I'm sure they are much lower quality than Dewalt and other good brands, but for the price I paid ($150 for the 7-piece set), I'm very happy with them. I've only used the drill maybe 15 times since then and the rest of the tools just once or twice, but they've all done what I needed to do.
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post #12 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 07:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccaliban View Post

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...d/RipCirc.html

Has instructions for a simple, easy to make. accurate rip sled for a circular saw.

Awesome! Glad I bought a Ryobi circular saw this morning at HD.
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post #13 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 10:10 AM
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I have a bunch of the old Ryobi One+ blue colored tools and also the new green colored series.

The One+ blue colored tools work great. But the yellow/black colored batteries that come with them, absolutely SUCK horribly.

The new green colored tools are of less quality than the old blue colored ones, but are "okay". I killed my drill somehow (HD replaced it no problems). And the saw seems to have more vibration than it should.
But the new grey colored lithium batteries are GREAT. They last for quite a long time and I'm super impressed with them.

So basically, all the Ryobi tools are "okay" except for the old black/yellow colored batteries. Stay far away from those.

Btw, you can use the new battery in the old tools.

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post #14 of 27 Old 11-28-2008, 05:03 PM
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I had a Ryobi 18v unit too and the battery died.

The batteries were crap for the most part....I did have the black/yellow ones.

I replaced it with a Rigid 12v driver. They had them on sale for $129 for 2, with 4 batteries and a charger.

You never think you need two until you have two. One with a drill bit, another with a screw bit.

Better power and way way smaller than the Ryobi. You can pick up the singles for $79 and they are great for the money.

I also have a Rigid router and a Rigid 10" miter saw, great products, yes more expensive than Ryobi but worth it IMO.

Plus they have the lifetime warranty if you register it online within 90 days. They don't make it easy. You have to register it online, get the code from the website, then put it together and mail it into them.

However lifetime warranty on power tools is a great thing.
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post #15 of 27 Old 11-29-2008, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by v1rtu0s1ty View Post

Awesome! Glad I bought a Ryobi circular saw this morning at HD.

I make better cuts on 4x8's with this Ryobi 18v saw than on my cheap table saw. I find it much easier to move the lightweight saw over the 4x8 than move a heavy 4x8 over a table saw. If you don't trust you steady hand, use a straight edge to guide it (and have freshly charged batteries!)

Hey I didn't realize I can use the lithium batteries in the older 18v equipment! I assume I need to get a lithium battery charger as well? I would think the charge curves of the different battery topologies are much different.

Dr V

Edit : Don't bother with the 18v chainsaw. It came with my kit and its about useless. The reciprocating saw OTOH is a great tool to have. Get some metal cutting blades and wood ripping blades and you can destroy about anything!
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post #16 of 27 Old 11-29-2008, 02:33 PM - Thread Starter
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I ended up getting the basic kit with the drill, circular saw, flashlight and vacuum for $60 with two extra battery packs for free and I paid $40 for the rotary cutter. All in all I spent $100 for all this:

Drill
Circular Saw
Rotary Cutter
Flashlight
Vacuum
2 extra batteries

I am wondering though if I should return the kit with the extra batteries and get the Jig Saw.
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post #17 of 27 Old 12-29-2008, 12:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Gilbert View Post

...
A router is a great tool, though I would say for speaker building, I have only used them for decorative edges or for recessed holes. My Ryobi plunge router is still going strong after about 11 years. I had it fixed for $50 (half what I paid for it) about seven years ago when the shaft lock broke, because it just felt better in my hands than anything else.
...

Well, seven years later, the shaft lock on my Ryobi router broke again, so the thing is once again useless. I took a look at some in the store over the weekend, and the Skil 1825 seems like a really nice unit for the price. Anyone use one? I'm big on ergonomics, and the overwhelming majority of routers I handle in the store just don't feel right in my hands, like the Ryobi does. The Skil feels great, though. For it's price, I could by two of them compared to most of the others available locally. Seems to have good reviews.
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post #18 of 27 Old 12-29-2008, 06:00 AM
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I have the Skil 1820, which I think is the same as the 1825 but without the interchangeable fixed base (mine only has the plunge base). I have no complaints about it, though it's the only router I've had, and I've only used it for cutting driver holes and braces. I don't need one often, so I went with the cheapest one I could find with acceptable reviews. But I can tell you that the jasper jig fits on it. I also got a table for it to make cutting some of my braces easier. The LED lighting is nice, and it's cool that it works without a physical switch. Seems to have some kind of proximity sensor that turns on the light when your hands touch the handles.

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post #19 of 27 Old 12-29-2008, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darin View Post

I have the Skil 1820, which I think is the same as the 1825 but without the interchangeable fixed base (mine only has the plunge base). I have no complaints about it, though it's the only router I've had, and I've only used it for cutting driver holes and braces. I don't need one often, so I went with the cheapest one I could find with acceptable reviews. But I can tell you that the jasper jig fits on it. I also got a table for it to make cutting some of my braces easier. The LED lighting is nice, and it's cool that it works without a physical switch. Seems to have some kind of proximity sensor that turns on the light when your hands touch the handles.

Thanks for the great feedback! The 1820 is almost the same as the 1825. The 1825 offers variable speed instead of fixed, a motor rated at 2.25HP/11A rather than 2HP/10A, and a 1/2" vs 1/4" collet. But other than those, they are identical. Either way, I think they both should be an upgrade from my old Ryobi, which has served me fine other than the one issue - it's also been my only router. I only do major projects a few times a year, though have minor ones a bit more frequently. I really like the site-light. I have that on my Skil circular saw, and it's been great - though not strictly as useful on a circular saw since I always use a guide. I don't use my router for for cutting driver holes at all, so it doesn't get as much use as it ordinarily might. I use it for rounding edges, cutting dados and recesses, and perfect vertical holes on pieces too large to fit on the drill press.
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post #20 of 27 Old 12-31-2008, 08:36 AM
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Ryobi is crap. Is it good enough for you? That's a decision you will have to make yourself. It doesn't mean they won't do the job.

I recommend Milwaukee circular saws, Bosch drills and routers.

"Vintage" is good for wine, not for A/V equipment.

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post #21 of 27 Old 12-31-2008, 10:53 AM
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post #22 of 27 Old 01-01-2009, 06:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan View Post

Ryobi is crap. Is it good enough for you? That's a decision you will have to make yourself. It doesn't mean they won't do the job.

I recommend Milwaukee circular saws, Bosch drills and routers.

For the money, I totally disagree.

I have a wide selection of the One+ tools - for light/medium duty around home use and projects, they are great.

I've had most of them now for 4+ years and I've never had one fail. I've gone through several batteries however (which is the nature of the NiCad batteries).

I wish they sold the Lithium ion batteries separately, however!

I've used the reciprocating saw, right angle drill, drill/screwdriver extensively in my basement remodel.

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post #23 of 27 Old 01-01-2009, 06:38 AM
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I agree. They are light duty tools and for the DIYer probably fine, and a very good value. I use the drill and light for service work, because I like the durability and low cost of the batteries. I have six that I rotate on the charger and always have a couple at home and a couple in the tollkit with a backup. I have worn out the switch on one drill after a couple of years of taking hundreds of screws out of TVs daily, but all of the batteries are still going after many cycles. I sometimes run them down all the way with the light or the fan, and sometimes keep them charged, but they seem to hold up well. All of the ones that I have are the standard batteries, not the lithium.

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post #24 of 27 Old 01-01-2009, 12:18 PM
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"I wish they sold the Lithium ion batteries separately, however!"

They do; best prices are on ebay.

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post #25 of 27 Old 01-01-2009, 01:18 PM - Thread Starter
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Well even though I still have my Ryobi tools my wife still got me a Hitachi MK12V router for Christmas. I figured that the router would be doing most of the work for the most part and it's something that could last me forever.
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post #26 of 27 Old 01-01-2009, 11:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnsteph10 View Post

For the money, I totally disagree.

For the money perhaps, but overall they are no good. I have a B&D drill and a Ryobi drill. When I got my Bosch 36v Li-Ion drill, it felt like I had switched to a corded drill, except without the cord. So, so much better.

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post #27 of 27 Old 01-01-2009, 11:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VectorLabs View Post

Well even though I still have my Ryobi tools my wife still got me a Hitachi MK12V router for Christmas. I figured that the router would be doing most of the work for the most part and it's something that could last me forever.

Just FYI, I was in Lowes today and they have the MK12V fixed/plunge router kit on clearance for $116 or so. I don't know if this applies to all Lowes, but I believe that's the lowest I've seen that router, new or refurbished. It definitely looks like a great tool, and very tempting. I found the part needed to fix my Ryobi router for $1.54, so we'll see if I can keep it going.
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