Rotozip spiral saw or save for a plunge router? - AVS Forum
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi guys. I saw a great deal on a rotozip spiral saw. Is this something that is of use with all the diy stuff or would I be better off just saving the cash and getting a good router and circle jig?
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Old 12-19-2012, 03:16 PM
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I would get a router and circle jig. the heavier and thicker plywood will be difficult with a tool like that. I would hate to cut a 18" hole in 3/4 baltic birch with one of those eek.gif

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Old 12-19-2012, 03:34 PM
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I also have a RotoZip... While handy, the jig to cut circles is not easy to set up... The circles end up too small or too big. A router is the way to go.... The RotoZip is handier to trim veneers due to its smaller size and lighter weight.

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Old 12-19-2012, 04:12 PM
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You can cut a hole with a jig saw if you really want to go cheap. The Ryobi RE180PL Is $99 at Home Depot all the time and works fine. That is what I used to cut holes in my enclosures. Maybe you can rent a router or jigsaw from Home Depot?

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Old 12-19-2012, 05:22 PM
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My cheapo Ryobi router was about $100. It's not a plunge type and no soft start, but it gets the job done.

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Old 12-19-2012, 07:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrkazador View Post

You can cut a hole with a jig saw if you really want to go cheap. The Ryobi RE180PL Is $99 at Home Depot all the time and works fine. That is what I used to cut holes in my enclosures. Maybe you can rent a router or jigsaw from Home Depot?

1. A jig saw won't recess drivers unless you stack another layer of sheet goods on top.



2. It won't let you trim to fit. Where you're not using miter joints two opposite sides of box shaped speakers have a dimension matching that of another panel plus twice the material thickness, where 3/4" nominal could be 23/32", 18mm, or 19mm. It's much easier to trim to fit than trying to make a panel that lines up exactly. You can use a flush trim bit in any router hand-held or table mounted.



Also if your budget is limited you definitely don't want to buy a commercial circle jig. A scrap of your favorite 1/4 to 1/2" sheet good (plywood, MDF, Masonite, etc.) with holes drilled for bit clearance, to mount your router (with counter sinks) and for arc centers works just as well and can be configured for odd dimensions (ex - metric) to get a tighter fit around recessed driver rims. The short 1/8" steel dowel pin that comes with Jasper jigs works great as a pivot, although you'll pay a lot less (like $1) buying one from a hardware store than you will on one of the store bought jigs that includes one.

For really small circles you can have the pivot pin under the router base.




The other thing worth noting is that while people like carbide spirals you can also use straight bits which cost less as long as you plunge while cutting (use multiple passes).
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