Multi-sub: adding DIY-SG flatpack 18"+15" sub to 4x15" IB line array - Page 3 - AVS Forum
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post #61 of 89 Old 03-17-2013, 05:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Progress thru today, Sunday:
step 6: glue along inner front piece & top/bottom/both sides contact, install inner front piece (a very slight tap needed), clamp, wipe off glue with slightly damp rag, let dry 2 hrs



step 7: apply glue to Outside front, temporary lay onto inner front and push down for glue contact both pieces


step 8: Remove Outside front, see where glue not contact, add glue and spread
(I was too busy here to take some picts....)

step 9: Final assy time! put Outside front back on, gently tighten the 8 1/4-20 screws as clamp for driver area, wipe glue with slightly damp rage off MDF the circle cutout




step 10: Apply 4 clamps to 4 corners approx 1" in both, wipe glue with slightly damp rage off MDF





step 11: add more clamps on outside and inside perimeter of front baffle, progressive tighten and wipe glue



Here is where I am right now, Sunday Mar-17-2013 8pm.
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post #62 of 89 Old 03-18-2013, 03:46 PM
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Thanks for the update, and heck yeah man that looks awesome. That 18 is a beast.

I was planning to build my own, I also drew the base design in Sketchup. It's more BF style, all out of 1/2" ply with clever bracing... I'm going for light weight plus I have a lot of ply that I bought planning to build horns LOL.

I've been out of the loop, so I didn't even know about HEMI in April--thanks for mentioning it. I'll look at the info and see, but if it's within driving distance and I don't have any serious conflicts I'll almost certainly attend. Anyway, out of the loop for lots of reasons--work has been a bit busier, I've had some car trouble that has sucked some time, and I've been studying. I finished Toole's book, and have been plotting and planning how to do various more-advanced acoustical measurements plus procuring what I need for my own upgrade projects. And not enjoying my theatre often enough!
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post #63 of 89 Old 03-18-2013, 03:48 PM
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Oh yes also... more proof that YOU CAN NEVER HAVE TOO MANY CLAMPS.

Looks like you're using regular wood glue? I was planning to use PL premium for all my stuff. No need for caulk, but I'm sure the wood glue cleans much better.

I'm eager to see your finishing plan.
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post #64 of 89 Old 03-19-2013, 02:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Titebond II liberally spread + caulk all interior seams, after reading the pros/cons of PL Premium I went that way.
Very easy to clean up Titebond II, simple slightly damp rag, wipe.

Michigan sucks for cold when painting, I've got a HVLP can't use indoors, garage too cold....
I'll probably put the box in the garage, use a router and hit all the edges with a roundover bit, bring box inside to warm.

Use a roller for primer then some durable flat black, duratex seems to be the choice but it's kinda pricy at $20/pint or $52/gallon and "out of stock" - except 5 gal bucket @ $252, and my subs are not going anywhere but my basement so that may be overkill for my needs.
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post #65 of 89 Old 03-19-2013, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by aackthpt View Post

Looks like you're using regular wood glue? I was planning to use PL premium for all my stuff. No need for caulk, but I'm sure the wood glue cleans much better.
I haven't used or recommended anything but PL Premium for about seven years now. It actually cleans easier than wood glue. Where PL is within the joint it expands into the wood fibers. But where it lies on the wood it just sits on the surface, and scrapes off easily after it cures, rather than soaking into the wood like wood glue does. The key is not to touch it until after it cures, then scrape it off with a scraper or chisel.

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post #66 of 89 Old 03-19-2013, 07:11 AM
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Mike,

I'd missed this until now. I experimented similarly beginning about a year ago.

I'd planned a dual IB system. Between planning and completion, I encountered a series of life changing health issues(on-going). So all my planning/measuring, etc, to mitigate room influences with a front IB, and a rear IB, were realistically adjusted. So I was somewhat stuck with only the front IB. So about a year ago, heavily in the middle of mucho acoustic experimentation in my room, I too decided to add some small sealed subs to address modal issues and experiment with in a wide variety of ways.

As you know, IB bass has a wonderful characteristic (your build inspired me). Once tuned, blended, I was elated with mine. And even though I achieved quite the decent response at the LP, I sought out more and more. So about a year ago, I bought (no more DIY for a while) a couple of SubMersives to do pretty much what you're attempting here. I'd planned on a DIY effort, but cardiac issues dictated otherwise. If the DIYSound group flat packs were available, I would've likely gone that avenue, with some high quality 18's. But wth, these SubMs are wonderfully made, well executed, highly refined subwoofers.

My experimenting is ongoing, and everything takes a great deal of time as I've got to be careful, and often need my wife or kids to help me move things around. I learn things all the time. I've got a couple measuring rigs; REW based M-Audio mic-pre, ECM8000. And I've had OmniMic since it was launched back in 2010. Much of my recent work has been in re-working/re-config'ing of my acoustic treatment.


Anyway, I'm following along now. As always Mike, well done so far.

------------------------------------
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------------------------------------
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(3)Seaton Cat12C up front, (4)QSC K8 sides/rears
(2)Seaton SubM-HP, (4)18" IB
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post #67 of 89 Old 03-19-2013, 08:04 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by aackthpt View Post

Looks like you're using regular wood glue? I was planning to use PL premium for all my stuff. No need for caulk, but I'm sure the wood glue cleans much better.
I haven't used or recommended anything but PL Premium for about seven years now. It actually cleans easier than wood glue. Where PL is within the joint it expands into the wood fibers. But where it lies on the wood it just sits on the surface, and scrapes off easily after it cures, rather than soaking into the wood like wood glue does. The key is not to touch it until after it cures, then scrape it off with a scraper or chisel.

Bill - I value your feedback, your years of expertiese shows in posts on this forum.
If properly applied, Titebond II does the same joint performance form an engineerring viewpoint as PL Premium, correct?
(ie, the joint is not the failure mode, rather the base material fails)

I used Titebond II on MDF, I can see where PL Premium may perform "better" than Titebond II on certain wood applications, that is my subjective opinion.

As a Licensed P.E., for me it's all about fact based data.
Are their controlled test's that show the advantages of PL Premium when the applciation process is not as robust, like by a DIY beginner....
(where I'm going is this discussion should be added to the DIY sticky here)
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post #68 of 89 Old 03-19-2013, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

If properly applied, Titebond II does the same joint performance form an engineerring viewpoint as PL Premium, correct?
(ie, the joint is not the failure mode, rather the base material fails)
Yes. The advantage to PL lies in the gap filling properties as well as joint strength. If you have no gaps then you don't have to be concerned with filling them, but few DIYers are that good. That's especially true with more complicated designs like mine, where you can't even see many of the joints, and if you don't get it right the first time there is no second chance.

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post #69 of 89 Old 03-19-2013, 07:37 PM
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One reason I mention it is I believe if you did PL, you would see the squeezeout on all your joints, and then have no need to caulk all the joints. I've spent a lot of time around the BF forum since I started planning to build one of his designs--picked up a lot of tips on successful use of PL.

I know I have seen a test that I think was on the PL premium (not 100% sure, it was quite a while ago, on the diyaudio collaborative tapped horn thread IIRC) but not sure I have ever seen one on Titebond II, in order to compare performance re cohesive vs adhesive failure. I agree with your assessment that it probably depends on type of wood--if I had to guess the Titebond would probably do better on MDF than ply, and PL better on ply than MDF, though I think if reversed I'd rather have PL on MDF than Titebond on ply. But would "does better" be measurable? I suppose it's likely that both, properly applied, would yield cohesive failure which would be an essentially useless result. In any case, it would be really cool to have some actual data--even if just pictures of failure in different materials with different types of joints. Maybe we should do some tests and write an article for data-bass. biggrin.gif
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post #70 of 89 Old 03-20-2013, 01:26 PM - Thread Starter
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John - for these flat packs they are CNC cut and such low risk to have gaps, using Titebond II is a no brainier.
Maybe this summer I'll take some scrap pieces of various wood, and "play" with different adhesives/etc and see the failure modes.....surely if a search on the web is done that has already been done......

Went to urgent care this morning for sinus infection/respiratory, worked VO from home.

Had time to sand the joints with palm sander, used 150 grit.
Just a few areas need slight touch up - barely, as I did not use brad nails.
I'll apply wood filler, let it dry, then sand with 220 grit.


In handling I noticed how easily the sharp MDF corners nick, definitely I'll use router w/roundover bit on all edges.
I'm also going to insert 4 neo magnets at the corners for possible future grille, but after calculating it would be honking big.
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1379949/more-flat-pack-kits-coming/240#post_23103878
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With the size of the surround on the SI drivers I don't think I could do grills unless I had at least a triple front baffle. So, that settled it for me, no grills.

If one wanted a grille, considering the 1.25" surround height is same on both 15" and 18", with 22.5mm Xmax (one-way linear) and 43mm Xmech (one-way) ...how much absolute clearance should one give from the base of the speaker to the grille cloth?

1.25" + 43mm aka 1.69" (worst case) = say 3".
Or is 1.25" + 22.5mm aka 0.88 = 2.2" enough for 99.9% , and if the surround touches the grille cloth just once in a while that is acceptable?

For the Flat Packs with 1/2" recess on front 3/4" MDF baffle, 1 x 2 stock (3/4" x 1 1/2") would not be enough, so 1 x 3 stock (3/4" x 2 1/2") as minimum, those would look like...big hunky grilles?
I was considering Grilles on my flat pack subs, but now that seems not best case for the SI drivers.
.
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post #71 of 89 Old 03-21-2013, 02:18 AM - Thread Starter
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Just doing some web 101 on wood glue joints:
A easy, simple read.
My take: Liberally spread the glue, and clamping is a must, even for these CNC flat packs.
For seasoned vet of sub building the below is probably obvious.
However the people buying CNC flat packs may not know this stuff.
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Glue_Joint_Failure.html
Quote:
Glue Joint Failure
Dr. Gene Wengert delves into one of the primary problem areas affecting furniture manufacturers: glue joints. 1998.

by Professor Gene Wengert

Editors note: The following article is an excerpt from the book "The Wood Doctors Rx", by Gene Wengert, Professor and Extension Specialist in Wood processing Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

One of the major areas in furniture manufacturing that causes problems is gluing - edge gluing, laminating, and veneering. There are at least a hundred items that could be wrong when a glue joint is below par, ranging from an incorrect adhesive formulation to an excessive cure time because employees were on coffee break. Moreover, as a general rule, a gluing problem is frequently a result of several factors that by themselves are no problem but when combined add up to trouble. A manager or supervisor who must troubleshoot an adhesive failure is therefore faced with many possible causes for the failure. The following four sections are presented to provide an understanding of glue joint failure of what is needed for proper adhesion and also to provide a few clues on what could be wrong.

Anatomy
There are five "links" in any glue joint (Figure 42-1) and the strength of the joint is the strength of the weakest of these five links.

Link 1
The middle link is the strength of the glue itself. If the proper adhesive has been chosen and if it has been handled correctly (stored at the right temperature, not too old, correct catalyst added, etc.) then this link is very strong, stronger than the wood.

Links 2 and 3
The next links on either side of the middle link are most often the cause of glueline failure. Weakness results because the adhesive, for one reason or another, cannot attach itself to the wood.

Links 4 and 5
These links represent the strength of the surface of the wood. It is possible through machining or sanding to damage the wood surfaces so that they are not so strong as necessary. A recent study by the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory for example has shown that abrasive planing damages surface fibers more than knife planing, causing possible problems for joints in exterior exposures.

Stages in Formation
When a poor glue joint is examined closely, often it is possible to see what went wrong in formation of the bond and the exact problem can be identified by understanding the five necessary stages in forming a good glue bond.

Stage 1
The adhesive, after application to a wood face, must flow to form a fairly smooth, continuous film. If the adhesive doesn't flow, marks from the spreading pattern will usually be visible. The adhesive won't flow if it's too thick (possibly because it's too cold), if the wood's too hot or too cold, if the wood's surface is dirty, or if there isn't enough adhesive.

Stage 2
The adhesive must transfer to the opposite, mating surface. This requires pressure and sufficient adhesive. The adhesive must also be able to flow and cannot have begun to set and harden.

Usually a failure of Stage 2 will be evidenced by having the adhesive only on one side of a broken joint. Lack of sufficient pressure and precuring are common causes. In turn, often caused by excessive assembly time or too dry wood. Insufficient adhesive can be a cause as well. Often the lack of pressure is a result of "non-flat" surfaces.

Stage 3
With the application of pressure, the adhesive penetrates the surface's nooks and crannies. This action provides mechanical strength for the bond.

Such mechanical strength provides shear resistance, but has little tensile (pulling apart) strength. As with Stage 2, pressure (as well as the other items mentioned) is important.

Stage 4
Good glue joints are characterized by good molecular bonds between the wood's and adhesive's molecules. For this bonding to occur, the wood and adhesive must be in intimate contact. However, sometimes the wood's surface is contaminated or is chemically unable to bond. This is called a " nonwetting" surface. (Imagine trying to glue two pieces of wood that have oil on their surfaces.)

Stage 5
The final stage is the solidifying of the adhesive. Failure to solidify may be caused by too cold a temperature, pH problems, or adhesive/catalyst problems. The rate of solidifying of a PVA is influenced by the wood's moisture content (the drier, the faster) and by temperature (the hotter, the faster).

Technical Nomenclature
The nomenclature for failures of the five stages is rather straight forward:

- Bonded joint: No failure; it's what we want.
- Starved joint: Insufficient adhesive in Stage 1, 2, 3 or 4 results from low spread rate, too much pressure squeezing all the adhesive out, or too much penetration into porous surface. This latter condition results in bleed through with thin veneers.
- Pre-cured joint: The adhesive reached Stage 5 before completing all of the earlier stages.
- Unanchored joint: Stage 3 was successful but not Stage 4.
- Undercured joint: Stage 5 did not occur; adhesive may still be tacky.

Diagnostic Appearance
As a final clue, the appearance of the glue line may identify the problem:

- Foamy or air bubbly. Air bubbles are trapped in adhesive because it was setting up too rapidly or because of bubbles in the adhesive itself.
- Grainy or sandy. The adhesive doesn't adhere to itself (old glue, error in formulation), or lumber that is too dry withdraws water before all five stages are completed (apply pressure faster, use more adhesive, etc.).
- Separated. The resin filters into the wood leaving filler and/or extender on the surface. Check catalyst and assembly time.
- Tacky. See Undercured joint in the previous section.
- Fuzzy. The joint appears covered with wood fibers (like peach fuzz). Evidence of failure of Links 4 or 5, a damaged wood surface, as mentioned earlier.
- Skipped or intermittent. The closeness required for good bonding is missing.
- Burned. (only in Radio Frequency units.) Indicates too much adhesive in one spot or wet lumber.

Professor Gene Wengert is Extension Specialist in Wood Processing at the Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Here's an article on PL type glue...."The Truth About Polyurethane Glue" - February 6, 2007
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/article/the_truth_about_polyurethane_glue

other:
http://techtalk.parts-express.com/showthread.php?230067-Big-fat-THUMBS-DOWN-to-Loctite-PL-Adhesive
http://www.solowoodworker.com/wood/glue.html
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infadh/infadhe.html

btw, I see Bill F is everywhere....a great resource for builders
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post #72 of 89 Old 03-21-2013, 05:26 AM
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Here's an article on PL type glue...."The Truth About Polyurethane Glue" - February 6, 2007
That article is about typical urethane glues of the Gorilla type. They're totally different from PL Premium. I don't use them myself.
I've recommended PL to over 20,000 users and haven't had a single report of joint failure when the adhesive was used according to the label instructions. I'm convinced that the user in this link did not follow those instructions and blamed the result on the adhesive rather than himself.

As for using PL with MDF, I don't use MDF, so I have no personal experience.

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post #73 of 89 Old 03-28-2013, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Going to be a busy Easter weekend!

Hit the edges with a wood file for slight 45 bevel:


Jasper Jig for 3 1/16" hole for the binding post cup


Done and fits perfect, pre-drill the 4 holes
.

I had $50 in Lowes gift cards, so went the quick/cheap route of Zinsser Bulls Eye Water Base Interior Primer had them tint it grey, then flat black Valspar Ultra , the Lowe's paint guy said its a very durable paint, from the spec sheet
Quote:
Thick, 1 coat coverage
Stain-resistant and scrubbable
I'm painting primer Baffle face down first, then after drying overnite I'll flip onto rear and paint the baffle front tomorrow. Then same for the flat black final coat.
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post #74 of 89 Old 03-29-2013, 07:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Some progress:

Paint 2nd coat after 2-ish hours, then flip dried painted surface onto these 2 x 4's covered with old rag to make sure new paint not stick to the raw wood, worked fine:


Keeping paint fresh for 12-18 hrs via food wrap, leave little air as possible


Early this morning at 3am, dogs woke me up, I applied 2nd coat onto the front baffle and 3rd coat onto the sides


9am this morning, flip back over, and start with the flat black.
Even with the gray primer I can see not 100% coverage, definitely a 2nd coat needed.


I'm sure it's been said before, but these big cubes painted black look like a fricking Borg Cube!
That would be a perfect way to dress 4 of these up for mid-wall placement in a Star Trek themed theater.
Lego's could do the trick.


Or even some printed wallpaper
https://www.filterforge.com/filters/5210.html


Maybe I'm thinking once these are in my HT to dress them up to match what's on my rear bass traps...
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post #75 of 89 Old 03-29-2013, 08:24 AM
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I like the Lego idea for the right room theme. That would be pretty cool looking if done correctly. I would have to enlist my Daughter as I have very little creative art capability!

That is some serious commitment getting up at 3AM!
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post #76 of 89 Old 03-31-2013, 06:06 AM - Thread Starter
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well, when the dogs wake me up to go outside for a potty break, and then you go back to bed with thoughts of "what needs to be done", sometimes its easier to just do something then go to bed.

I'll wait on the Borg Cube re-do, see where 3D printing is going in 1-2 years, possible do that.....

Here the box is all painted, I put a photo gray card to calibrate correct greysacle and see how "black" the flat black is to reference black.....nice to say black is black.
.

now just need to solder wires to the binding post cup, mount that, stuff polyfill, wire & mount the driver, then .... box #1 done, 2 more to go.
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post #77 of 89 Old 09-07-2013, 09:55 PM
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Mike, you might like this ongoing thread on the BF forum: http://billfitzmaurice.info/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=20406

So far the PL premium hasn't been shown to be the best, but we'll see. The guy didn't yet wet the wood, which is said to be key to getting maximum PL bond strength when building in a dry environment.

Not necessarily pertinent to the MDF question, of course.
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post #78 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 02:15 PM
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step 7: apply glue to Outside front, temporary lay onto inner front and push down for glue contact both pieces


step 8: Remove Outside front, see where glue not contact, add glue and spread
(I was too busy here to take some picts....)

step 9: Final assy time! put Outside front back on, gently tighten the 8 1/4-20 screws as clamp for driver area, wipe glue with slightly damp rage off MDF the circle cutout




step 10: Apply 4 clamps to 4 corners approx 1" in both, wipe glue with slightly damp rage off MDF


Thanks for the detail on this DIY sub build. I'm doing the same except with the Dayton 18" instead and your details and photos have helped tremendously for a newbie like me at this.
How did you prevent the Titebond from oozing down the threads of the fasteners when you squeezed the outstide and inner fronts together? It seems like it would eventually find it's way down the holes and into the fastener threads.

Thanks.
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post #79 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 02:39 PM
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well, when the dogs wake me up to go outside for a potty break, and then you go back to bed with thoughts of "what needs to be done", sometimes its easier to just do something then go to bed.

I'll wait on the Borg Cube re-do, see where 3D printing is going in 1-2 years, possible do that.....

Here the box is all painted, I put a photo gray card to calibrate correct greysacle and see how "black" the flat black is to reference black.....nice to say black is black.
.

now just need to solder wires to the binding post cup, mount that, stuff polyfill, wire & mount the driver, then .... box #1 done, 2 more to go.

Looking very nice, great finish work. cool.gif

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post #80 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 04:17 PM
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Thanks for the detail on this DIY sub build. I'm doing the same except with the Dayton 18" instead and your details and photos have helped tremendously for a newbie like me at this.
How did you prevent the Titebond from oozing down the threads of the fasteners when you squeezed the outstide and inner fronts together? It seems like it would eventually find it's way down the holes and into the fastener threads.

Thanks.

Maybe I'm answering my own question, but after some thought, maybe the trick is to thread the hex bolt into the fastener from the inside of the cabinet until it's flush with the inner top? Preventing any glue from getting into the hole as you compress the two top pieces of MDF together.
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post #81 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 05:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the detail on this DIY sub build. I'm doing the same except with the Dayton 18" instead and your details and photos have helped tremendously for a newbie like me at this.
How did you prevent the Titebond from oozing down the threads of the fasteners when you squeezed the outstide and inner fronts together? It seems like it would eventually find it's way down the holes and into the fastener threads.

Thanks.

Maybe I'm answering my own question, but after some thought, maybe the trick is to thread the hex bolt into the fastener from the inside of the cabinet until it's flush with the inner top? Preventing any glue from getting into the hole as you compress the two top pieces of MDF together.

sorry I missed this thread post - yes exactly I just used each bolt to act as a clamp, and since threaded no glue got there.

btw, here are the 2 subs in place
The 18" against the front wall, the 15" against the side wall.
HT%252011.3%2520cover%2520off%2520Pano-b.jpg
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post #82 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 05:36 PM
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Duplicate, sorry.
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post #83 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Maybe I'm answering my own question, but after some thought, maybe the trick is to thread the hex bolt into the fastener from the inside of the cabinet until it's flush with the inner top? Preventing any glue from getting into the hole as you compress the two top pieces of MDF together.

Mike gets into more detail about the fasteners in this thread. Maybe that will help?

Edit: Oops, I see MIke has already answered above. Double oops - I accidentally did a duplicate post, caused by my "back" button.
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post #84 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 05:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Mike, you might like this ongoing thread on the BF forum: http://billfitzmaurice.info/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=20406

So far the PL premium hasn't been shown to be the best, but we'll see. The guy didn't yet wet the wood, which is said to be key to getting maximum PL bond strength when building in a dry environment.

Not necessarily pertinent to the MDF question, of course.

Hi John - for these CNC cut flat packs with the fine design EricH did good old Titebond did the trick.
I did apply silicone caulk inside on all joints just as precaution for sealing.

If I built my own design and cuts, then I'd go the PL glue route, make sure I damp the joints before apply, wipe up before dry.

Thx for the link, so much good info Bill F spreads around these forums.
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post #85 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 05:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by andyc56 View Post

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Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Maybe I'm answering my own question, but after some thought, maybe the trick is to thread the hex bolt into the fastener from the inside of the cabinet until it's flush with the inner top? Preventing any glue from getting into the hole as you compress the two top pieces of MDF together.

Mike gets into more detail about the fasteners in this thread. Maybe that will help?

Edit: Oops, I see MIke has already answered above. Double oops - I accidentally did a duplicate post, caused by my "back" button.

Yes - my OCD kicked in there, post 12 http://www.avsforum.com/t/1464218/best-fastener-to-use-when-mounting-sub-drivers-to-mdf#post_23106584

btw, Gorilla has a sticky DIY thread here that is great , http://www.avsforum.com/t/1443078/new-to-diy-faqs-in-here
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post #86 of 89 Old 10-23-2013, 07:37 PM
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I must have OCD too, because I loved that thread! Learned a lot from it.
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post #87 of 89 Old 10-24-2013, 09:43 AM
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since the problem is across the seats, it would seem that stacking the subs on the left side may be a good place to start?

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post #88 of 89 Old 10-24-2013, 09:46 AM
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would kill off the odds, but not sure if the outer seats are getting hit with evens.



just for the other folks who might be following along.

if the subs are placed in the dips, they will not excite the modes.

also if subs are placed one in a (-) and one in a (+) zone, those will cancel, so "not excite" in some sense.

worst case is to put a sub in a place where a curve is it is peak. such as one sub along a wall or in a corner. eek.gif

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post #89 of 89 Old 11-09-2013, 02:38 AM - Thread Starter
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Hey LDT02, I've not stopped the final part of this, location and measurement confirmation of the 2 added subs.
Just got my new MacBook Pro Retina, so learning the whole HDMI-REW interface thing, but having a laptop is definitely better than lugging the 2007 iMac into the HT.
http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/rew-forum/65896-getting-around-limitations-javasound-os-x.html
That was a chore in itself, so been avoiding measurements.

I'm actually up early, 5am here, before the kids awake so I can have 2 hours to get thru mechanics of HDMI-REW down.
Hopefully will post charts/etc here shortly.....

and as I'm posting this my 2 "helpers" came down...
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