Building a sub is a learning experience... - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 Old 03-25-2013, 10:57 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I am currently in the process of building a subwoofer using the Dayton Audio RSS315HF-4 12" subwoofer and the Dayton Audio HPSA-500 subwoofer plate amplifier. I wanted to really build two subs for my room but now the second sub will have to wait. It has been and continues to be a learning experience. I am hoping that the trials I go through will help future DIYers.

I do not have any experience in woodworking except for re-veneering a pair of Polk Monitor 10s and rebuilding a dead Polk PSW650 subwoofer (which came out kind of mediocre). I really wanted this to come ouit right. Unfortunately, I found out you really, really need the right tools. Other than basic stuff, all I had was an old circular saw and a RotoZip.

I bought a 4' x 8' 0.75" MDF panel from a local hardware shop and had them cut the panel into specified sizes for the build. After assembling the basic box, I was dismayed to find out that the box did not come out square. Apparently, the shop saw was "off", it was cutting the board about 1/4" smaller on one end from another on the 96" length. This meant the right angles were not exactly 90 degrees so the box was out of square.

I tried making a jig to make straight cuts, which was somewhat successful, but the panel dimensions were always a tad off. I bought a Kreg universal rip fence. Once calibrated, this gave me accurate cuts with no issues. BTW, get a new blade with a lot of teeth, they will make cleaner cuts. Make sure its a carbide blade, they will last longer. When cutting the panels, cut all the same dimensions first.

.

Initially, I used a RotoZip for cutting the cutouts. This is real exercise in patience. The RotoZip circle cutter is useless. It is made out of plastic and flexes in use which makes the cuts uneven. Cutting out straight cuts freehand is impossible as the unit loves to pull in different directions. On the other hand, the RotoZip is great for trimming laminates.

So I had to invest in a Porter Cable 690LR with a Jasper Circle Cutting jig. With a cutting bit, this combo made circle cutting a breeze. Highly recommended, I don't know how I survived without it.




Couple of minor issues. Don't lose the 1/4" pin on the Jasper rig, It's really tough to replace (I ended up using a spare 1/8" bit, mine got sucked into the shopvac. Gotta dig the pin out of the vac bag). And the power switch on the router is awkardly placed on top edge of the motor housing instead of near the router grips.

I also invested in a small Jigsaw. The jigsaw made cutting out the opening for the amplifier really easy. I bought a small Black and Decker unit for $50. Couple of things to note, buy a new blade. The blade that comes with the jigsaw is really cheap and useless. When cutting, do not use the orbital mode, it tends to pull the blade out of line.



Right now, I have the sub cabinet built. All the six panels are together, the driver and amp cutouts are done. Couple of the panels were a smidgen off and there is a slight gap (about 1/32" inch which I have filled in). I will post some pictures of my progress later. My next step is to sand the cabinet and apply some cherry veneer. I still have to figure out how to make and attach my grill. I am debating whether to use magnetic grill holders or snap-in pins.

Like I mentioned earlier, I wanted to build two subs, but the additional expense of buying all the tools (~$400) set me back on the budget. Buying a second driver, amp and ancillary parts from Parts Express is about $600 ($400 plus $200 shipping to Hawaii, dang Paradise tax) so the second sub is on hold for the time being. Will post my progress.

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 Old 03-25-2013, 11:11 AM
Advanced Member
 
Louquid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 748
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 37
Wow. I too had no tools, but all I bought was a cheap jigsaw. I had Home Depot make the cuts for me and they came out relatively accurate. I had to make a few adjustments myself, but it was easy enough with sandpaper(And lots of time).

I like woodworking, and really wish I had a full set of tools. I would have no problem spending money on quality woodworking tools that I would get years of use out of. But, I just don't have the space for it all right now.

Louquid is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 03-25-2013, 02:20 PM
AVS Special Member
 
fbov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bushnell's Basin, NY
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
This is why subwoofers love PL Premium and urethane glues - they expand to fill gaps. All you need is a sealed box; square panels or skewed panels, it don't matter as long as it doesn't leak.

This is one reason these guys are a great resource:
http://www.diysoundgroup.com/
Specifically
http://www.diysoundgroup.com/subwoofer-flatpacks-2.html

I have their Anarchy horn sub KD box and the qualilty is excellent.

But, a circular saw with panel jig, router with circle jig, drill and jig saw are about all you'll need - maybe a sander, too, as they save a lot of time - to build any of a wide range of speaker projects. The nice thing is these tools all fit in a duffle bag... perfect for limited spaces.

HAve fun,
Frank

PS find a hardwood lumber yard, that caters to the furniture trade, and you'll get good cuts from your panels. Just be prepared to pay a nominal fee, and no deal on the wood!
fbov is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 03-25-2013, 05:03 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I used Bass Box Pro to plan my build of the Zaph Audio design. The Zaph Audio design calls for a cabinet 18" H x 18" W x18.75" D. This ends up with a QTc of roughly 0.620, which means the bass should be a lot tighter and less boomy. According to Bass Box Pro, the ideal QTc is 0.707 but the PE support all recommend that the QTc be lower for better sound at the expense of some bass extension (which turned out to be very minimal, only one or two Hz).

On a side note, my original plan was to build a 18" cube with a one-inch thick cabinet to lower resonance. Building a preliminary box proved what Zaph Audio maintains. Thick cabinets are not a cure for resonances in a cabinet. Braces are more effective combatting resonances than wall thickness. Wall thickness will lower the resonace, braces will stiffen the wood to eliminate it. Tapping on the Zaph braced design sounds a lot more solid than a one-inch thick cabinet (which is LOT heavier, a typical one inch MDF 4x8 panel weighs over 100 lbs, a 0.75" panel weighs about 70-80 lbs)).

My only concern was that the DA RSS315HF-4 12" driver would exceed xMax (maximum driver excursion) at about 400-watts at 20-Hz or below. After talking to Parts Express and HarrisTech (makers of Bass Box Pro), they said that should not be much of an issue as there is very little sources that will go down to 20Hz, most movies go down only as low as 30-Hz.

The plans called for 18" x 18.75" for the top and bottom panels. Two 18.75" x 16.5" panels for the sides and two 16.5" x 16.5" panels for the baffles and rear panel. Assembly was completely done with TiteBond II glue, no screw or nails if at all possible in the event I decide to chamfer the edges. I did not want to destroy a router bit on a screw head if at all possible.

Advice, start with the bottom panel (large panel) and glue the front and sides (the smaller panels) and finally the top (large panel). That way, you can get the glue evenly on all edges. I made the mistake of gluing the bottom, side and top first. The front and rear baffles were extremely tight squeezes and I later realized that all the glue I spread on the inside edges were being squeezed out when pushing in the baffles (I told you I was noobie... a dumb one at that).

I got around this by laminating a 1/4" panel to the back (that way, I could countersink the sub amplifier, making it a flush mount instead of having the amp floating above the rear panel). Then I could liberally apply the glue around the 1/4" panel and push it in. I did the same thing with the front panel with a 1/2" baffle laminated to the speaker baffle. This made the front baffle 1.25" thick and made for a more secure mount for the 12" driver. This enlarged the depth of the cabinet to 19.5". Another tidbit, when buying thinner MDF panels, make sure that they are FLAT. One of them I bought was not completely flat and even after laminating it, the end result was a slightly bowed baffle which I had to sand down to flush.

Another hint, when installing the t-nuts into the back of the rear baffle, mount the driver to the front baffle to ensure that the t-nuts go in "square". It's a big pain when you mount the t-nuts and realize the bolts don't mate well with the t-nut bolts).

Also, TEST the driver before mounting it. Parts Express will charge you a stocking fee if the driver is defective and you return it with any "mounting scars" (any paint is scraped of the frame from the mounting screws/bolts).

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 03-26-2013, 11:50 AM
AVS Special Member
 
fbov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bushnell's Basin, NY
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
You're building, so of course you're learning. Wait until you discover a) biscuits and b) rabbets. I never have alignment issues any more... twist is another story, as two recent projects attest.

Yes, test before mounitng, but only if you may want to return the part. When something's truly defective, PE won't be restocking it and rarely wants it back, so restocking is moot. Then again, I have screwed up and returned good parts as defective...

Have fun,
frank
fbov is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 03-26-2013, 12:46 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 87
Great post, Jon. I am sure it will be helpful to others starting out like you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon S View Post

Other than basic stuff, all I had was an old circular saw and a RotoZip.
You were half way to having enough power tools
Quote:
So I had to invest in a Porter Cable 690LR with a Jasper Circle Cutting jig. With a cutting bit, this combo made circle cutting a breeze.
Good choice. For the benefit of others, you really don't need a circle cutting jig. You can just replace the router base with a piece of plywood with a hole drilled in the right place to give you the radius of the circle. I survived for years doing that until I got access to a CNC machine shop and made my own jigs.
Quote:
I also invested in a small Jigsaw. The jigsaw made cutting out the opening for the amplifier really easy.
Yeah, jigsaws are sometimes useful. I have used them over the years. But it would be the last tool I would buy today. Again, for the benefit of others, just be aware that you can make that hole with a router.
Quote:
...$200 shipping to Hawaii...
Ouch!

For anyone else considering building something like this with minimal power tools, you can do it with one power tool, a router. With a router and a straight edge, you can cut out panels (this is the same thing computer controlled equipment does in high tech cabinet shops) ,clean up rough edges, square up edges, make holes in panels, etc.
Colm is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 03-26-2013, 01:03 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by fbov View Post

...find a hardwood lumber yard, that caters to the furniture trade, and you'll get good cuts from your panels.
And you will have access to better material than you can get at your local home improvement store, including baltic birch plywood, cabinet grade plywood veenered in many different types of wood, exotic hardwoods from around the world, etc.
Colm is offline  
post #8 of 21 Old 03-26-2013, 01:15 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by fbov View Post

...biscuits and...rabbets.
Rabbets are a staple of woodworking, but not biscuits. Woodworkers got along just fine for thousands of years before biscuits were invented. They do have their uses (I have a plate joiner), but IMHO they don't live up to the hype. Seems that they started to become popular when Norm started using them on This Old House and New Yankee Workshop on PBS. That said, in keeping with the minimalist theme, if you want to use biscuits, you don't need a plate joiner to use biscuits. You can do it with a piloted slotting bit on a router.
Colm is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 03-26-2013, 02:29 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Lumber yards... I wish. Hawaii does not have any real lumber yards... The only place you can really find lumber would be the local Home Depot or Lowes.

Most homes here are on really, really small plots of land. I think the average new home is built on only 5,000-6,000 square feet of land. Buying a new 2500 sq ft home on that property will set you back at least $750,000. With that type of expense, you do't find many people with the luxury of a workshop. That's why I have to do my stuff in my garage after I park the cars on the street. Unfortunately, working with all that MDF leaves a LOT of MDF dust all over which is really hard to get rid of. I had to redo my floors with laminates a few years ago, cutting all the planks in the garage. The garage ended up looking like a dust bin.

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #10 of 21 Old 03-26-2013, 03:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 87
Yeah, Hawaii is a different world in many ways. It is the only place I have heard of where little league baseball teams travel to games on jets.
Colm is offline  
post #11 of 21 Old 03-28-2013, 09:02 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Okay, I built the sub following the Zaph Audio plans which I found to be pretty easy to follow. You can find a build for the sub here. Here are some pics of the box after painting and then sanding... The first picture shows the bottom which was painted semi-gloss black.

I deviated from the plans somewhat. I decided to mount the speaker baffle permanently instead of making the baffle removable. That's why there is no screwholes on the front. I am still deciding whether to use magnet grill holders on the front or whether to use the plastic snap-in grill mounts instead....





If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #12 of 21 Old 03-29-2013, 01:17 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Uploading more pictures... I felt that the edges were not as flush as it could be so i decided to put more drywall filling in... No matter how good I tried to flush the edges, the edges seem to shift a bit as the glue dries (maybe due to some expansion). The edges weren't that bad but i just wanted to make it as perfect as possible.

i also decided to use magnets to attach the grill. I tried using magnets within the grill and the MDF baffle before. The magnet strength was a bit too strong and it looked like it was pulling the magnets out from the MDF even though I had glued them with Gorilla glue. This time I am trying to use wood screws in the MDF and have the magnets match with the screw heads. Plus the fact the screw threads would help keep the screws in place. I decided to place them in the 12,3,6 and 9 o'clock positions. This is in the event the magnets would be too weak to support the grill with the subwoofer in operation. I could then replace the magnetic grill with snap-in inserts at the 10,2,4 and 8 o'clock positions if needed (for aesthetic reasons I prefer the grill guides there) and the screwheads would be still be hidden from view.




Have to wait for the filler to dry before sanding it down.


Unfortunately, you can't really see the screw heads too well in this shot.... If you look good, you will notice that I placed 12 braces instead of the called for eight within the cabinet. I flushed the first set against the amplifier box and spread the braces equally inside. My first trial box build had some resonance towards the rear since there really was no bracing there. There was also some additional resonance issues near the driver baffle which the additional braces eliminated.

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #13 of 21 Old 03-29-2013, 01:26 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon S View Post

No matter how good I tried to flush the edges, the edges seem to shift a bit as the glue dries.
Nothing should shift if the panels are properly clamped, but it is a pain to get the panels to align exactly. If you don't have clamps, you can nail, then sink the heads and fill the holes after the glue sets up.

Here is a trick for future use. Let the edge of one panel overlap the other slightly, then use a flush trim bit on the router.
Colm is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 03-29-2013, 10:59 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Here's some shots in process of applying the veneer... The veneer I used was Sauder Cherry 2'x8' paper backed. I did not use the veneer with the Scotch adhesive already on the veneer. I was told it does not adhere well to plain MDF.

I cut the veneer into separate pieces slightly larger than the box. I spread the glue on the back of the veneer and the surface of the cabinet. I used a 4" foam paint roller to spread the glue evenly. Otherwise the veneer may feel a bit lumpy if the glue was not leveled out evenly. I let it dry and reapplied a second coat of glue on the cabinet and let it dry because the first coat tended to be absorbed by the MDF.. I then placed the veneer over the top surface and used a scraper to remove any air pockets. Later, I placed an old cotton t-shirt over the surface and used a clothes iron on high to "reactivate" the glue. I kept on applying heat and pressure until the veneer was bonded to the cabinet surface. After that was completed, I used my RotoZip to trim the veneer using a laminate trimmer. This left a feathered edge which was sanded down with a sand block. I then proceeded to the next panel.

I applied the veneer on the rear panel then the front baffle with the grain running up. Then I applied the veneer on the left side, top and right side. I matched the grain running from left to right.

I used walnut before and decided to try cherry. I did not care for the cherry because the veneer got all lumpy and uneven when the glue was applied. Also, the cherry tended to rip the edges when cutting across the grain. I did not have that issue with the Sauder Walnut veneer. That was why I got some air pockets. Make sure you get rid of the air pockets otherwise the veneer will lift even more down the road. Another issue I had was that the veneer was darker on the section that was exposed to the sun. The hidden part of the roll was lighter. I found out that cherry gets darker when the veneer is exposed to sunlight. I used the exposed darker panels on the front and rear baffles..


Applying the Titebond II glue to the underside of the veneer


The top panel has the Titebond II glue applied and awaiting the veneer...


The box with the veneer applied on all sides except the bottom

Kinda screwed up sanding the edges. The top left corner of the speaker baffle was sanded down to the paper. The paper is exposed about 1/16" of an inch by an inch...



I am going to let the glue dry overnight and apply the stain either tomorrow or the day after, depending on the weather. Rain is forecasted...

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #15 of 21 Old 03-30-2013, 03:40 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Well, today turned out pretty sunny so I decided to stain the subwoofer. I am using a mixture of Varathane Cabernet and Dark Cherry. I first wiped down the veneer to make sure there was no dust on the box. I applied Varathane wood conditioner and let it sit for an hour, and then applied one coat of the stain and wiped it off before it could dry. I then reapplied a second coat of stain a few hours later and again removed it before it could dry. I might apply a third coat. After that, I will have to wait a few days for the stain to dry out before I apply a finish to the veneer. I might spray a clear lacquer or polyurethane.


If you look closely, my first sub box is behind the present one......




As expected, the top edge of the rear of the box came out a tad darker. I mentioned earlier that the veneer had darkened due to light exposure.

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 04-01-2013, 10:06 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I applied a clear lacquer over the finish... I used three cans of aerosol lacquer. i then sanded it down with 600 grit sandpaper. Then with 0000 steel wool. I used a Porter Cable RO buffer with car polish and then covered it with Meguiar's Car wax.





I installed the driver and amplifier into the cabinet and set it up in the house. While it did not look that large while building, it looked rather imposing in the home. I must admit the bass output was a lot more substantial than expected. Sorry, i don't have any pictures of the completed build yet. I had to install the driver and amp in the home near the end because the completed sub weighed 80 lbs...

To be frank, I am not satisfied with the end result of the cabinet. The veneer did not stain evenly in some areas. I had sanded down the veneer before staining, using 120/220 grit paper and then vacuumed the cabinet and then wiped it with a tack cloth. I then applied wood conditioner and waited 30 minutes as instructed. My previous rebuild of a Polk subwoofer in walnut came out with a lot better finish in walnut.

I think I will rebuild the cabinet and try and finish it with rounded vertical edges and paint it gloss black.

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 04-01-2013, 10:55 AM
Advanced Member
 
tential's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 593
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon S View Post

I applied a clear lacquer over the finish... I used three cans of aerosol lacquer. i then sanded it down with 600 grit sandpaper. Then with 0000 steel wool. I used a Porter Cable RO buffer with car polish and then covered it with Meguiar's Car wax.





I installed the driver and amplifier into the cabinet and set it up in the house. While it did not look that large while building, it looked rather imposing in the home. I must admit the bass output was a lot more substantial than expected. Sorry, i don't have any pictures of the completed build yet. I had to install the driver and amp in the home near the end because the completed sub weighed 80 lbs...

To be frank, I am not satisfied with the end result of the cabinet. The veneer did not stain evenly in some areas. I had sanded down the veneer before staining, using 120/220 grit paper and then vacuumed the cabinet and then wiped it with a tack cloth. I then applied wood conditioner and waited 30 minutes as instructed. My previous rebuild of a Polk subwoofer in walnut came out with a lot better finish in walnut.

I think I will rebuild the cabinet and try and finish it with rounded vertical edges and paint it gloss black.

Looks pretty good man. I'd keep it around first before being sold on making a new one. I get that feeling when I get something new, see it for the first time, then want something different right away. I'm going for a gloss deep red. Hoping it turns out alright.
tential is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 04-02-2013, 10:44 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Here are some pictures of the finished sub in the room. It looked a lot smaller outside during the build. It takes up quite a bit of space in the room. I finally was able to "dial" it in last night. Initially, the bass output was quite strong. It looked like the driver was being overdriven, I was kind of afraid of how far the driver was moving in and out of the cabinet. After fiddling with the controls, it now sounds about right. The bass is really tight and I can feel some pressurization from the driver. It goes down really low. The more I looked at the sub, the more I am leaning at rebuilding it in a gloss black cabinet.

For the price, this sub really killed the $1000 Definitive Technology SuperCube 6000. The SC6000 sounded it could go low but I could not feel any deep bass. I think it was peaking at 40-50Hz.




If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 04-03-2013, 09:07 AM
AVS Special Member
 
fbov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bushnell's Basin, NY
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Nicely done!

What have you got inside the box? Mine have lots of fiberglass insulation.

HAve fun,
Frank
fbov is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 04-03-2013, 10:10 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
Jon S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Sunny Hawaii
Posts: 2,665
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 41
I used Dacron...

I have decided to totally scrap the sub and rebuild it... I will be using an unused HPSA-250 for the subwoofer in a new black 18" cube build. I did not like the way the finish came out. I will be taking the 500-watt amp out from this sub and build a 15" sub using the Dayton Audio RSS390HO-4 subwoofer, again in a 18" sealed box. The HO is designed for smaller cabinets (I don't want to go larger than 18", it looks too overwhelming in a room). The HO will give me a Qtc of about 0.620 in the 18" cabinet.

If it's not a BIG screen, it's not a theater...
Jon S is offline  
post #21 of 21 Old 04-03-2013, 12:24 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 87
A comment or two about paper backed veneer...

Paper backed veneer is so thin that it won't stand up to much sanding at all, as you found out. 120 grit is way too coarse. I wouldn't use anything coarser than 320. The veneer should be pretty much ready to go out of the box. Make sure the sandpaper is not lubricated with stearates. They will get into the wood and affect the way it takes the finish. Finishing is somewhat a dark art, but I suspect that most of your finishing problems originated in sanding.
Colm is offline  
Reply DIY Speakers and Subs

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off