Anyone use the Festool TS55 REQ Track Saw? - Page 3 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #61 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 01:59 AM
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Gents.

I'm getting ready to purchase a track saw and had a quick question.

Was thinking about the Festool TS55, but I found this Makita SP6000 at a reasonable price. From what I have researched, the Makita saw seems to be compatible with using the Festool tracks. However is the reverse true?

Can the Makita use the Festool track guides???

The reason I ask is because I can't get 55" tracks (from any manufacturer) out here to my physical location. Shipping anything over a 108" girth to an APO address is a no go. Festool makes a 32" Track that I can get delivered out here to me.

I found some construction suppliers out here and they look at me funny when I ask them if they stock Track Saws, so purchasing locally is out of the question at this moment.
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post #62 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 02:14 AM
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The makita is good, works on the same track as festool if I remember. I used the makita in my builds, was happy with it. Festool is a bit higher quality, but if you don't have other festool stuff, it might not be worth the cash.
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post #63 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 02:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popalock View Post
Gents.

I'm getting ready to purchase a track saw and had a quick question.

Was thinking about the Festool TS55, but I found this Makita SP6000 at a reasonable price. From what I have researched, the Makita saw seems to be compatible with using the Festool tracks. However is the reverse true?

Can the Makita use the Festool track guides???

The reason I ask is because I can't get 55" tracks (from any manufacturer) out here to my physical location. Shipping anything over a 108" girth to an APO address is a no go. Festool makes a 32" Track that I can get delivered out here to me.

I found some construction suppliers out here and they look at me funny when I ask them if they stock Track Saws, so purchasing locally is out of the question at this moment.
i would go with the festool over the makita if u ever plan on cutting hardwood or cheap ply
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post #64 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 03:52 AM
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Originally Posted by cookieattk View Post
i would go with the festool over the makita if u ever plan on cutting hardwood or cheap ply
Is it really worth almost twice the price? I'm anticipating cutting nothing but cheap ply at my current location.

One reason I like the Makita is that it has a cut depth of over 2", which will be useful to me for cutting thicker wood when I build my riser.

Everyone I've talked to and every review I've read/watched all say that the festool is a more polished product, but what does that really mean? Is it like comparing a GT-R to a Turbo S?

I found this review between the Festool, Dewalt and Makita informative.
http://www.aconcordcarpenter.com/dew...d-to-head.html
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post #65 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 04:56 AM
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Pop,

Here's a link to supplemental guide info for Festools http://www.waterfront-woods.com/festool/
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post #66 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 05:24 AM
 
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I've been playing with idea of getting a track saw. I really should.
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post #67 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 05:40 AM
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I have used both Makita and Festool, but own a TS75. It has WAY more power and a cleaner cut on serious hardwoods. It also produced better cuts on ply, but this is only material if you're say building furniture with it. For general construction work the Makita is more than adequate.

I cut the mitres for this table with the Festool.....I'd be impressed if I could achieve the same with the Makita. But as I said, if its just breaking down sheets etc, the Makita is excellent.

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post #68 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popalock View Post
Is it really worth almost twice the price? I'm anticipating cutting nothing but cheap ply at my current location.

One reason I like the Makita is that it has a cut depth of over 2", which will be useful to me for cutting thicker wood when I build my riser.

Everyone I've talked to and every review I've read/watched all say that the festool is a more polished product, but what does that really mean? Is it like comparing a GT-R to a Turbo S?

I found this review between the Festool, Dewalt and Makita informative.
http://www.aconcordcarpenter.com/dew...d-to-head.html
Pop, why over 2"? Nominal is always less than 2". I've seen a couple comparo vids and yes they seem like comparisons between a gtr and Porsche turbo s I'll take my gtr everyday since I had to pay for it lol. Although, if I got to pick one or the other new for same price then I'd choose the Turbo S just because it's a tad more refined.
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post #69 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:16 AM
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I never used the Makita but I love my t55.
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post #70 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elill View Post
I have used both Makita and Festool, but own a TS75. It has WAY more power and a cleaner cut on serious hardwoods. It also produced better cuts on ply, but this is only material if you're say building furniture with it. For general construction work the Makita is more than adequate.

I cut the mitres for this table with the Festool.....I'd be impressed if I could achieve the same with the Makita. But as I said, if its just breaking down sheets etc, the Makita is excellent.


Nice table and good explanation in general. You finishing that table or just gonna put some oil on it?
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post #71 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post
I've been playing with idea of getting a track saw. I really should.
If you're building more than a couple cabinets it's well worth the time savings alone since it's meant as a one operation system with full sheets. I love mine.
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post #72 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by popalock View Post
Is it really worth almost twice the price? I'm anticipating cutting nothing but cheap ply at my current location.

One reason I like the Makita is that it has a cut depth of over 2", which will be useful to me for cutting thicker wood when I build my riser.

Everyone I've talked to and every review I've read/watched all say that the festool is a more polished product, but what does that really mean? Is it like comparing a GT-R to a Turbo S?

I found this review between the Festool, Dewalt and Makita informative.
http://www.aconcordcarpenter.com/dew...d-to-head.html
I bought the Makita earlier this year and couldn't be happier. The cuts are precise and clean and repeatable. The accuracy is all about how well you can measure and set up the track on the line. I used it to cut the miters required on my curved 10-99 center channel as well and they were dead on. I have never used the Festool, but for the money and the types of projects that I'll be doing with this saw, I don't see any need to want for more in the future. I also like the feature that locks the saw onto the track when it is in a miter position; it prevents the saw from falling over from its own weight. The Festool does not have this feature. Also, just as a general plug for all good tracksaws, there is no other tool that I could have used to precisely cut off the excess material on the front edge of my curved top like this:
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post #73 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:37 AM
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Originally Posted by audiovideoholic View Post
If you're building more than a couple cabinets it's well worth the time savings alone since it's meant as a one operation system with full sheets. I love mine.
I completely agree. The amount of time I saved doing all of the sheet cuts for my center channel was unbelievable!
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post #74 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by audiovideoholic View Post
Pop, why over 2"? Nominal is always less than 2". I've seen a couple comparo vids and yes they seem like comparisons between a gtr and Porsche turbo s I'll take my gtr everyday since I had to pay for it lol. Although, if I got to pick one or the other new for same price then I'd choose the Turbo S just because it's a tad more refined.
Oh yeah...nominal, nice. I guess I don't know my way around wood as well as some others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dtsdig View Post
I bought the Makita earlier this year and couldn't be happier. The cuts are precise and clean and repeatable. The accuracy is all about how well you can measure and set up the track on the line. I used it to cut the miters required on my curved 10-99 center channel as well and they were dead on. I have never used the Festool, but for the money and the types of projects that I'll be doing with this saw, I don't see any need to want for more in the future. I also like the feature that locks the saw onto the track when it is in a miter position; it prevents the saw from falling over from its own weight. The Festool does not have this feature. Also, just as a general plug for all good tracksaws, there is no other tool that I could have used to precisely cut off the excess material on the front edge of my curved top like this:
Sweet. I think the Makita will work in my situation for the time being.

Thanks for everyone's input.

Last edited by popalock; 09-26-2014 at 08:08 AM.
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post #75 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 06:50 AM
 
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If you're building more than a couple cabinets it's well worth the time savings alone since it's meant as a one operation system with full sheets. I love mine.
by cabinets you mean speaker boxes? Or actual cabinets ? I'm doing a full remodel, and dedicated build. I am sure I would get use out of it. If I bought one I might even offer folded horn, or ported sub flat packs for east coast or local pick up.

I do ok with my circular saw and bar clamp, my circular saw blade is set exactly 1" from the metal guide so if I just measure and mark an inch short, line the bar clamp up on that, and go I get a perfect cut every time.

When I do speaker boxes and sub boxes I tend to cut up the sheet with the circular saw but cut everything about a 1/4" large, then I use the fence on the table saw with the exact setting, run every piece with the common dimension through it before adjusting for the next dimension. Usually trim off about a blade width, and do every side of every cut on every piece - trying to use the factory edges on the fence side. This makes everything identical cut, and square. It's an extra step sure, but well worth it (if you have a table saw).

I'm too weak to manage full sheets on the table saw, that's just bullchit. But once you cut them up, usually you are working with pieces that are under 24" for most DIY speaker and sub boxes so using the table saw and fence becomes a good option IMO. I could not do it only on the 42" length of the ported box I made, and in retrospect I probably should have just used the full sheet width (48" or 49" for MDF) and not even cut that. I'd guess most do it that way for the marty boxes.

But I have a lot of cutting to do on my subflooring, riser, stage etc.. plus entire remodel. And I have a tapped horn project going on, and would be making at minimum 4 boxes for that (1 prototype, and at least 3 final ) for which it would make life easier. I'm cheap though. I might ask Santa Clause for one for Xmas. Ok, scratch that. It's more like I already decided I will definitely ask Santa, now I just need to figure out which one. There seems to be a lot of conflicting opinion in this thread so I am just as confused as ever.

I know that JPA loves his Dewalt.
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post #76 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 07:02 AM
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...
I think most would be happy with the Dewalt, the Makita or the Festool. There are pros and cons to each, but I think that once you reach a certain level of quality and good design, the rest is all just bonus. I don't own a table saw for many reasons right now but with the track saw (and 110" of track) I don't have a need for one and the headache of finding room to store it. My workshop is my 2 car garage with the cars out of it so all of my woodworking stuff is on rolling carts so that it can all be tucked away. For what it's worth, the Makita SP6000J1 kit sells with a 55" track for $400. That's a great value, if you ask me.
Also, you mentioned the pain of handling full sheet goods on a table saw. I won't ever miss that (I used to have access to a table saw). I built a table for using the track saw with sacrificial 2x4s that holds the entire sheet at a perfect height and is rock solid. I just lay down my track, make the cut and move on. There is no shifting around of the sheet of MDF. It changed the way I can build things completely.
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post #77 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 10:13 AM
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by cabinets you mean speaker boxes? Or actual cabinets ? I'm doing a full remodel, and dedicated build. I am sure I would get use out of it. If I bought one I might even offer folded horn, or ported sub flat packs for east coast or local pick up.

I do ok with my circular saw and bar clamp, my circular saw blade is set exactly 1" from the metal guide so if I just measure and mark an inch short, line the bar clamp up on that, and go I get a perfect cut every time.

When I do speaker boxes and sub boxes I tend to cut up the sheet with the circular saw but cut everything about a 1/4" large, then I use the fence on the table saw with the exact setting, run every piece with the common dimension through it before adjusting for the next dimension. Usually trim off about a blade width, and do every side of every cut on every piece - trying to use the factory edges on the fence side. This makes everything identical cut, and square. It's an extra step sure, but well worth it (if you have a table saw).

I'm too weak to manage full sheets on the table saw, that's just bullchit. But once you cut them up, usually you are working with pieces that are under 24" for most DIY speaker and sub boxes so using the table saw and fence becomes a good option IMO. I could not do it only on the 42" length of the ported box I made, and in retrospect I probably should have just used the full sheet width (48" or 49" for MDF) and not even cut that. I'd guess most do it that way for the marty boxes.

But I have a lot of cutting to do on my subflooring, riser, stage etc.. plus entire remodel. And I have a tapped horn project going on, and would be making at minimum 4 boxes for that (1 prototype, and at least 3 final ) for which it would make life easier. I'm cheap though. I might ask Santa Clause for one for Xmas. Ok, scratch that. It's more like I already decided I will definitely ask Santa, now I just need to figure out which one. There seems to be a lot of conflicting opinion in this thread so I am just as confused as ever.

I know that JPA loves his Dewalt.
I'm talking about speaker cabinets. Any type of real cabinetry would require the higher end FTool IMO if don't have space for a true cabinet saw setup. I have the dewalt with extra tracks and router guide that can get within 1/16 of an inch on ANY cut, mitre or not but the FTool big boy will be that 1/16" better plus easier to operate, dissemble, add other features, etc... After saying that I did build a bar full of separate cabinets, bar top, finish work, etc.., a mid Atlantic replica of my true metal rack, a lot of my soffit and ceiling work all with the cheaper dewalt system. If I were to be selling any finished products the FTool would be worth the higher grade of detail finishing its capable of producing.

All the extra steps of cutting wood down to size for table saws is waisted time. I had my entire AV rack cut in under 30 minutes. It took longer to paint than cut plus assemble.

Here is the best example I can give comparing the Dewalt to the entry FTool. The FTool is like a racing ATV built by KTM and the Dewalt is a Honda. The KTM can be pulled apart and fixed in the amount of time the Honda rider has his part removed. There are just a number of very very small details that FTool implemented into their design that make it "industrial" so to speak.
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post #78 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by dtsdig View Post
I built a table for using the track saw with sacrificial 2x4s that holds the entire sheet at a perfect height and is rock solid. I just lay down my track, make the cut and move on. There is no shifting around of the sheet of MDF. It changed the way I can build things completely.
Plus 10000000! Couldn't agree more. It's totally different cutting since the entire sheet can just lay there until each piece is cut then can pick up whichever section one needs first and so on....

My setup is on wheels as well lol full sheet table/workstation.
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post #79 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 10:33 AM
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I'm talking about speaker cabinets. Any type of real cabinetry would require the higher end FTool IMO if don't have space for a true cabinet saw setup. I have the dewalt with extra tracks and router guide that can get within 1/16 of an inch on ANY cut, mitre or not but the FTool big boy will be that 1/16" better plus easier to operate, dissemble, add other features, etc... After saying that I did build a bar full of separate cabinets, bar top, finish work, etc.., a mid Atlantic replica of my true metal rack, a lot of my soffit and ceiling work all with the cheaper dewalt system. If I were to be selling any finished products the FTool would be worth the higher grade of detail finishing its capable of producing.
I agree with the Festool perhaps being more "commercial/industrial" grade, but I just wanted to add that the Makita is just as accurate as the operator is. The blade has zero runout and operates just as smoothly as any high end tool should.
I used the Incra T-Rule when making my cut marks and most of my cuts on my center channel build were dead on, like within 1/64th. I just think it's important that people don't get the impression that the only chance for accuracy is with the Festool system.
Carry on....
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post #80 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 10:34 AM
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My buddy is a carpenter and is a fan of the Festool over the others. Being a professional he is very concerned with safety and thinks the riving knife on the festool is mandatory. I don't believe the other saws have this feature.

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post #81 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 10:43 AM
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Between my brother and I, we own two Festool saws and one Makita rail saw. There is nothing wrong with the Makita besides it being a little less powerful and not being able to use some Festool attachments. If you're on a strict budget, the Makita is fine. If you can spend a little more, I would recommend Festool.
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post #82 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 10:50 AM
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I agree with the Festool perhaps being more "commercial/industrial" grade, but I just wanted to add that the Makita is just as accurate as the operator is. The blade has zero runout and operates just as smoothly as any high end tool should.
I used the Incra T-Rule when making my cut marks and most of my cuts on my center channel build were dead on, like within 1/64th. I just think it's important that people don't get the impression that the only chance for accuracy is with the Festool system.
Carry on....
Oh. Completely agree. Measuring and marking the cut line then placing the track correctly is purely user dependent and all saws will make a straight cut according to the users errors or preciseness. Some saws have different methods of angle measuring features for mitre cuts if that is important then one should watch some comparison videos.

Just going to add this in case nobody knows.

One can cut on either side of the dewalt track unlike the FTool. Not important to me at all but some more info to add to the choice.
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post #83 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 11:05 AM
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My buddy is a carpenter and is a fan of the Festool over the others. Being a professional he is very concerned with safety and thinks the riving knife on the festool is mandatory. I don't believe the other saws have this feature.
Huh? The dewalt has a knife but can't say for the others. The dewalt has a backwards lock too!
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post #84 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 11:17 AM
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Huh? The dewalt has a knife but can't say for the others. The dewalt has a backwards lock too!
Correct, the Dewalt has the knife as well.
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post #85 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 11:37 AM
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OK, guess just the Makita has no knife? The DeWalt looks nice. I haven't tried any yet but was also considering purchasing one. Supposedly the dust collection on the Festool is just awesome but I don't see myself plunking down another $500-$600 for a vacuum...

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post #86 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 11:51 AM
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Cool

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Originally Posted by SXRDork View Post
OK, guess just the Makita has no knife? The DeWalt looks nice. I haven't tried any yet but was also considering purchasing one. Supposedly the dust collection on the Festool is just awesome but I don't see myself plunking down another $500-$600 for a vacuum...
Hook up a $25 shop vac
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post #87 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 12:07 PM
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OK, guess just the Makita has no knife? The DeWalt looks nice. I haven't tried any yet but was also considering purchasing one. Supposedly the dust collection on the Festool is just awesome but I don't see myself plunking down another $500-$600 for a vacuum...
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Hook up a $25 shop vac
Yep, each choice has a vacuum/dust port. I just use my Rigid shop vac and it was the first time ever that I've cut MDF without a mask on. It was awesome.
I've bought a couple of these to keep around, it fits great into the makita dust port and then hooks right up to the smaller hose that I have for my shopvac. You just cut them at whatever diameter you need and then stick them in; they stay put nicely compared to the plastic adapter options that are out there.
http://www.amazon.com/Fein-921072K13...um+accessories
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post #88 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 12:53 PM
 
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How much price difference between makita and festool and dewalt ?
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post #89 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by audiovideoholic View Post
Nice table and good explanation in general. You finishing that table or just gonna put some oil on it?
That is the finished version (a sort of dull shellac finish). Here is another shot of it.....sadly I had to sell it as its not at all "baby" friendly. My wife and I were worried about out daughter smacking her head on the sharp edges.


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post #90 of 420 Old 09-26-2014, 01:51 PM
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That is the finished version (a sort of dull shellac finish). Here is another shot of it.....sadly I had to sell it as its not at all "baby" friendly. My wife and I were worried about out daughter smacking her head on the sharp edges.

That turned out really nice! Mind telling what you got out of it? Really modern yet not overly finished which worked well.

Did you see something similar or design it yourself?

Really off topic but a school kid friend of mine back 20+ years ago had a hippie pair of parents that built their home with a tree slap dead in the middle of it and had a wood working shop behind the house where they made a living. Some of their work as simple as a hollowed out wooden type decanter went for $1,500-$5,000. Some of their furniture pieces were outrageous. They didn't get many customers at the shop (middle of nowhere) but when they did they had driven extremely long distances to pick up the woodwork. I believe most of their sales came from traveling shows. Your table just really reminded me of staying the night over at his house and seeing all the random carvings/designs.
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