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post #1 of 31 Old 08-11-2014, 03:59 PM - Thread Starter
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how do you cut MDF to my easy speaker stand build

looking to make speaker stands. i did a sketch up and made a cut sheet. all fits on one 2'x4' board but now cutting it so they are the right dimensions. cause i feel if i cut it on the line it will take away from the next piece what is the best way to make cuts? tip?

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post #2 of 31 Old 08-11-2014, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie2075 View Post
looking to make speaker stands. i did a sketch up and made a cut sheet. all fits on one 2'x4' board but now cutting it so they are the right dimensions. cause i feel if i cut it on the line it will take away from the next piece what is the best way to make cuts? tip?
You need to take the blade width into account
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post #3 of 31 Old 08-11-2014, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie2075 View Post
looking to make speaker stands. i did a sketch up and made a cut sheet. all fits on one 2'x4' board but now cutting it so they are the right dimensions. cause i feel if i cut it on the line it will take away from the next piece what is the best way to make cuts? tip?
Whenever you take a measurement, make certain you are cutting on the right side of the line. In other words, once you scribe your line be cognizant of what side you need to cut on. This is what niktak11 was saying by taking blade width into account. Your blade will take about 1/8" maybe 3/16" if you have had a few beers...seriously don't drink and saw though.

What tools do you have for cutting? For large pieces of mdf a table saw is nice. If you only have a skil/circular saw think about being able to see the line you are going to cut. Try and orientate your piece in such a way that when you are going to cut you can easily see the line on the side of the blade that is visible. You will be able to see the blade well on the left side on most typical circular saws.

Lastly, a 60T or 80T blade is would be fine for mdf. More teeth will make a cleaner cut. At the box store the recommended material to cut is listed on the package. MDF is good at eeating up blades but your not doing a lot of cutting so buy whatever blade you want. I tend to avoid buying the cheapest blade available but I use my tools a lot and want things to last.

Lastly, cut the stuff with good ventilation or outdoors. That stuff produces so much fine powder and gets everywhere. Most certainly it is bad to breath.
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post #4 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 04:23 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by niktak11 View Post
You need to take the blade width into account
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Originally Posted by JayCrash450 View Post
Whenever you take a measurement, make certain you are cutting on the right side of the line. In other words, once you scribe your line be cognizant of what side you need to cut on. This is what niktak11 was saying by taking blade width into account. Your blade will take about 1/8" maybe 3/16" if you have had a few beers...seriously don't drink and saw though.

What tools do you have for cutting? For large pieces of mdf a table saw is nice. If you only have a skil/circular saw think about being able to see the line you are going to cut. Try and orientate your piece in such a way that when you are going to cut you can easily see the line on the side of the blade that is visible. You will be able to see the blade well on the left side on most typical circular saws.

Lastly, a 60T or 80T blade is would be fine for mdf. More teeth will make a cleaner cut. At the box store the recommended material to cut is listed on the package. MDF is good at eeating up blades but your not doing a lot of cutting so buy whatever blade you want. I tend to avoid buying the cheapest blade available but I use my tools a lot and want things to last.

Lastly, cut the stuff with good ventilation or outdoors. That stuff produces so much fine powder and gets everywhere. Most certainly it is bad to breath.
Okay thank you guys! Makes sense. I only have a circular saw. Maybe i can borrow someones table saw. I dont thing lowes or HD will do all those cuts for me.
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post #5 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by frankie2075 View Post
Okay thank you guys! Makes sense. I only have a circular saw. Maybe i can borrow someones table saw. I dont thing lowes or HD will do all those cuts for me.
They will do as many as you want. Might charge per cut after so many, but wouldn't be very expensive. Most prob won't charge though
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post #6 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 08:00 AM - Thread Starter
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They will do as many as you want. Might charge per cut after so many, but wouldn't be very expensive. Most prob won't charge though
Oh really? So just give him the measurements and let him do his thing hopefully right. Lol
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post #7 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 08:13 AM
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Okay thank you guys! Makes sense. I only have a circular saw. Maybe i can borrow someones table saw. I dont thing lowes or HD will do all those cuts for me.
If you only have a circle saw and it is a pretty good one, you might want to look into a track saw adapter (see example link below, there are others).

http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/c...saw_system.htm

But of course if a friend has a nice table saw...by all means use that! Means you can drink beer and make speakers together. Better option overall.

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post #8 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 08:16 AM
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Oh really? So just give him the measurements and let him do his thing hopefully right. Lol
You bet. Thats the only thing I don't like is ensuring they cut the right length. Most things, close is close enough.
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post #9 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 10:26 AM
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What side of the line you cut on depends on the circular saw you are using. Most circular saws have the blade on the left side of the tool, but there are some saws with the blade on the right.

When using a saw that has the blade on the left, (most common) you want to pull your measurement from left to right. In other words you will put the end of the tape measure on the left end of the material, and pull the tape to the right and make your mark. You should be holding the saw with your right hand, and this will put your body to the left of the saw, and over the piece you will be cutting. By doing this you will have a clear view of the saw blade and the line you are cutting. You want to see the line while making the cut to ensure you stay on it.

If you have a saw with the blade on the right you will want to do it opposite of the above. Pull your measurement from right to left, and hold the saw with your left hand.

You always want a clear view of the line while cutting, If you have a saw with the blade on the right, and you cut on the right side of the line, the motor of the saw will be blocking the line and you won't be able to see what's happening.

Measure and cut one piece at a time. Don't mark the whole sheet of MDF with all your cuts. This way you know for sure how big the piece will be, and you don't have to factor the blade thickness.

When it comes to marking the piece, always use a sharp pencil, you don't want a big ol fat line.

When it comes to cutting the piece, you want to split the line you marked. So when holding the piece you just cut you should barley see the line.

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post #10 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 11:07 AM
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Make your own straight edge
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post #11 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 12:10 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trepidati0n View Post
If you only have a circle saw and it is a pretty good one, you might want to look into a track saw adapter (see example link below, there are others).

http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/c...saw_system.htm

But of course if a friend has a nice table saw...by all means use that! Means you can drink beer and make speakers together. Better option overall.
Will look into this thanks!
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post #12 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 12:28 PM - Thread Starter
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What side of the line you cut on depends on the circular saw you are using. Most circular saws have the blade on the left side of the tool, but there are some saws with the blade on the right.

When using a saw that has the blade on the left, (most common) you want to pull your measurement from left to right. In other words you will put the end of the tape measure on the left end of the material, and pull the tape to the right and make your mark. You should be holding the saw with your right hand, and this will put your body to the left of the saw, and over the piece you will be cutting. By doing this you will have a clear view of the saw blade and the line you are cutting. You want to see the line while making the cut to ensure you stay on it.

If you have a saw with the blade on the right you will want to do it opposite of the above. Pull your measurement from right to left, and hold the saw with your left hand.

You always want a clear view of the line while cutting, If you have a saw with the blade on the right, and you cut on the right side of the line, the motor of the saw will be blocking the line and you won't be able to see what's happening.

Measure and cut one piece at a time. Don't mark the whole sheet of MDF with all your cuts. This way you know for sure how big the piece will be, and you don't have to factor the blade thickness.

When it comes to marking the piece, always use a sharp pencil, you don't want a big ol fat line.

When it comes to cutting the piece, you want to split the line you marked. So when holding the piece you just cut you should barley see the line.
Greatly appreciated! Great info and guidance! Thank you! I have some wood at home going to practice making some cuts.
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post #13 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 12:44 PM
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I forgot to mention the whole point of my post.........when using a saw with the blade on the left (most common) this is when you want to cut in the right side of the line. That way it leaves the line in after you cut.

The video linked is a great tip for making a rip board. The guy obviously knows what he is doing, and is using the rib board, but it's a perfect example of what I was talking about. As you can see his saw has the blade on the right of the saw, and he is using his right hand. This puts his body away from the blade and he can't see the line he is cutting. Again he is using a rip board but I think you see what I'm talking about.....the saw is blocking the line.
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post #14 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 04:10 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
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I forgot to mention the whole point of my post.........when using a saw with the blade on the left (most common) this is when you want to cut in the right side of the line. That way it leaves the line in after you cut.

The video linked is a great tip for making a rip board. The guy obviously knows what he is doing, and is using the rib board, but it's a perfect example of what I was talking about. As you can see his saw has the blade on the right of the saw, and he is using his right hand. This puts his body away from the blade and he can't see the line he is cutting. Again he is using a rip board but I think you see what I'm talking about.....the saw is blocking the line.
so i got home and look at my saw and of course the blade would be on the left. so now i have to hold it with my left hand!(im a righty).
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post #15 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 04:14 PM
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clamp a guide down to the piece and hold the saw tight to the guide, be sure to take in account for the width of the guide on your saw to the blade.
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post #16 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 04:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Porter cable
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post #17 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 04:38 PM
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so i got home and look at my saw and of course the blade would be on the left. so now i have to hold it with my left hand!(im a righty).

If the blade is on the left.....your good. You want to hold the saw with your right hand when the blade is on the left. Actually either way if you don't feel comfortable holding it with a hand that your not good with then don't. If you don't feel safe using your non dominant hand use the one you feel safe with. It just makes it awkward to use a saw that you cant see the blade.


Pick up your saw and hold it in your right hand.......look down at the saw......can you see the blade? If you can then your golden, if not then you have a saw with the blade on the right side of the tool. You can still use it with your right hand.....just will be hard to see the line.


Try this........if you hold the saw with your right hand, and you can see the blade, then put the saw in your left hand.......now you can't see the blade right? Can you see how this would be awkward to use this way?


The only right way to use a power tool is the safe way, and if by holding the saw in your left hand makes you feel unsafe then please use your right. By me saying to use your left hand, its only to see the blade and your mark better. I can use both hands so its not a problem for me.

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post #18 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 04:40 PM
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Porter cable

You can still use it and make it work.

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post #19 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 06:51 PM - Thread Starter
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So i tried some cuts on wood i had at home. EPIC FAIL! Cant cut to save my life. So i took a step back and put my thinking cap on a realized im much better at wiring then cutting thats what i did. Thank you everyone for you support and help. Maybe a table saw i can manage but not a circular. So heres how i solved my speaker stand problem.
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post #20 of 31 Old 08-12-2014, 07:41 PM
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Making your own straight edge guide is the way to go.

I have a table saw but it's easier with large sheets to cut with the skill saw jig.
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post #21 of 31 Old 08-13-2014, 04:09 AM
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Has anyone ever built a straight edge with a fixed track type device, kind of like a DIY track saw guide that would be specific to your particular cut, assuming that you have to make repeatable cuts of all the same width, or height?

For example, let's say you are building done DIY kitchen cabinets, and you have say 40 boards that will all be 12" wide. Could you not rig up a one use bracket or guide type thing that mounts to the 4' by 8' sheet of plywood a edge and holds the saw at a perfect 12" width for perfectl, exact cuts in the same fusion as the Festol track saw system, only this one would be DIY and have only one use, being that it is a fixed guide for cutting only 12" pieces and is non adjustable.

To me, this seems like it would be a fairly easy solution for folks who can't afford a Festol or Makita track saw setup?
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post #22 of 31 Old 08-13-2014, 06:55 AM
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Has anyone ever built a straight edge with a fixed track type device, kind of like a DIY track saw guide that would be specific to your particular cut, assuming that you have to make repeatable cuts of all the same width, or height?

For example, let's say you are building done DIY kitchen cabinets, and you have say 40 boards that will all be 12" wide. Could you not rig up a one use bracket or guide type thing that mounts to the 4' by 8' sheet of plywood a edge and holds the saw at a perfect 12" width for perfectl, exact cuts in the same fusion as the Festol track saw system, only this one would be DIY and have only one use, being that it is a fixed guide for cutting only 12" pieces and is non adjustable.

To me, this seems like it would be a fairly easy solution for folks who can't afford a Festol or Makita track saw setup?

I'm sure anything is possible.

I would think the easiest thing to do is build a board stop so you slide the workpiece into and under the straight edge jig. So it will always be at your set width. Then just quick clamp and be done.

I'm going to build my 2 marty cubes and with all the 24" cuts I might set something up instead of measuring and clamping my jig.
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post #23 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 05:22 PM - Thread Starter
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So went to lowes and walked around until my brain thought of something. I came up with 6 8in pieces and 3 3in pieces and made them H shape. There for my sho10s. Orderd gold spikes for the bottom of the stand.



Gold spikes..
http://www.parts-express.com/dayton-...4-pcs--240-666
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post #24 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 06:01 PM - Thread Starter
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Have to wait for gold spikes.
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post #25 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 06:10 PM
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I'm sure anything is possible.

I would think the easiest thing to do is build a board stop so you slide the workpiece into and under the straight edge jig. So it will always be at your set width. Then just quick clamp and be done.

I'm going to build my 2 marty cubes and with all the 24" cuts I might set something up instead of measuring and clamping my jig.
I did that for one of my projects. I used it to cross cut some narrow plywood sheets that were too wide to fit in my cross cut sled.



The lip on the left side hooked onto the edge of the plywood and my circular saw rode along the straight edge on the right. Worked ok but I have no use for it now. I wouldn't recommend this for ripping sheet goods the long way because something that big made out wood won't be true for very long. I also would have used it again if it was adjustable. I just ordered the EZSmart universal edge guide instead of a track saw. It looks like a good inexpensive solution. They also sell relatively inexpensive track saw systems.

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post #26 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Gorilla Killa View Post
clamp a guide down to the piece and hold the saw tight to the guide, be sure to take in account for the width of the guide on your saw to the blade.
Make sure the narrow part of the saw base is against the guide otherwise your saw will try to wander off the guide.
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post #27 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 06:24 PM
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I see you've already moved onto a different solution! Looks good. Will look better once you get those gold spikes.
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post #28 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 07:11 PM
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This is how I made mine and it works perfect every time.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/video/...rcular-saw.htm
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post #29 of 31 Old 08-17-2014, 07:46 PM - Thread Starter
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I see you've already moved onto a different solution! Looks good. Will look better once you get those gold spikes.
Yess cant wait.. Wed i should have them delivered.
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post #30 of 31 Old 08-18-2014, 04:36 AM
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Quote:
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I'm sure anything is possible.

I would think the easiest thing to do is build a board stop so you slide the workpiece into and under the straight edge jig. So it will always be at your set width. Then just quick clamp and be done.

I'm going to build my 2 marty cubes and with all the 24" cuts I might set something up instead of measuring and clamping my jig.

I may end up doing that, or just cutting on my old Black & Decker, cast iron, contractors table saw . The inches location on the bottom has rubbed off, so I have a hard time setting the fense properly.

I need to cut a couple of enclosures to 45" tall by 18" wide by 14" deep.

For this is would first cut the sides, front and rear baffles to 45" height, then adjust the fence to cut the sides, top, and bottom to the 14" depth, then adjust the fence again to cut the front and rear baffles as well as the top and bottom to their 18" width.

Does that sound right? If I do it the above way, and make each cut with the fence setup for multiple cites that are identical without adjusting the fence during these cuts, there is absolutely no way of this coming up with one board out if spec compared to the others, right?
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