What tools do you need to build and finish a cabinet? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 30 Old 03-17-2017, 03:40 PM - Thread Starter
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What tools do you need to build and finish a cabinet?

Hi everyone,

I don't quite know what I'll be building next, maybe the Atmos version of the Volt 6/8s, but it doesn't matter. Right now I'm in the process of slowly acquiring basic woodworking tools that will allow me to make and finish a cabinet.

So far I've ordered online:

- A hand planer to round the corners.
- A cordless drill (a small one). Yes, I didn't have one before
- A square to get the corners right
- A cheap Silverline dowel jig. Dunno if I'll just use glue alone or not, but it's $10 so whatever. Plus, it can also be used as a drill guide for straight drilling.

- Dowels of 3 sizes, of course
- Drill stop collars
- Drill bits (countersink and brad point)
- An automatic center punch, in case I'll be doing any drilling.
- 4 inch plastic clamps (no idea what they'll be good for, but they're dirt cheap so...)
- 4 Strap corner clamps with 90 degree plastic pieces (because proper clamps are freaking expensive and I'll need lots of them for a box.
- And even a gas soldering kit, because corded ones scare me.

Notice there are no saws on this nice list. That would be the most expensive tool, plus they require some sort of guide for rip cuts, so for now I'll have a carpenter cut the pieces for me. Oh and there's the fact that I live in an apartment, so noise and saw dust are real obstacles.

I already have this thing that holds sandpaper, for the finish.
I'll buy some sort of spray paint later. Maybe I'll just use lacquer, who knows.

So, anything else I might need?

The reason for me buying all this stuff before I even got the speaker parts is because I'm buying them all on eBay (most of the stuff ships from China), so it would take a month or so for items to arrive and I don't want to find myself in the middle of a project needing a $3 tool (that would probably cost $20 to buy locally). Overall I spent about $50 on these things, excluding the cordless drill obviously.
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post #2 of 30 Old 03-17-2017, 11:38 PM
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If you're buying a kit with a per-built crossover then you just need some Titebond glue and clamps to start. Then pending your finish you could acquire a few more tools if you're veneering or painting etc.

If you plan to build cabinets, that's another matter and if you want to keep your purchases down, while building your own cabinets, then I'd recommend a router and then table saw. You could have pieces cut by home depot and forgo the table saw, but you'll find the router to be extremely helpful with speaker building.

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post #3 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 12:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgwalsh View Post
If you're buying a kit with a per-built crossover then you just need some Titebond glue and clamps to start. Then pending your finish you could acquire a few more tools if you're veneering or painting etc.

If you plan to build cabinets, that's another matter and if you want to keep your purchases down, while building your own cabinets, then I'd recommend a router and then table saw. You could have pieces cut by home depot and forgo the table saw, but you'll find the router to be extremely helpful with speaker building.

peter
A router, not to mention a table saw, cannot be used in the average apartment. My plan is to buy kits with a front baffle, so I won't need a router. I can use my jigsaw to cut a rectangle for the rear cable plugs.

The hand plane will be used to round corners, instead of a router.
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post #4 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 12:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YonathanZ View Post
A router, not to mention a table saw, cannot be used in the average apartment. My plan is to buy kits with a front baffle, so I won't need a router. I can use my jigsaw to cut a rectangle for the rear cable plugs.

The hand plane will be used to round corners, instead of a router.
If you do think about spray painting in a flat ??? maybe try a small Foam roller for the painting using a good high rise sealant first for smothness!!! That would bring cost down a lot, but still will give you a great finish.

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post #5 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 07:14 AM
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A lot of apartments have a workspace or craft room. Do you have this sort of thing? Long ago I lived in a condo with a place like that. I used a sander and jigsaw in there when nobody was around. I opened the window and used a shop vac hooked up to the sander. Wasnt a problem.

Reason I ask is because even with flat packs you're going to want to sand. Sanding by hand is still dusty and a heck of a lot more work.

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post #6 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 08:38 AM - Thread Starter
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A lot of apartments have a workspace or craft room. Do you have this sort of thing? Long ago I lived in a condo with a place like that. I used a sander and jigsaw in there when nobody was around. I opened the window and used a shop vac hooked up to the sander. Wasnt a problem.

Reason I ask is because even with flat packs you're going to want to sand. Sanding by hand is still dusty and a heck of a lot more work.
Our building has a shelter room at the lowest floor (where the lobby is). It's pretty big and pretty much nobody ever enters it, but I don't know if it'd be appropriate to use it as a workshop.

I was thinking of doing the sanding (by hand) at the balcony of the apartment.
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post #7 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 09:32 AM
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Sanding by hand -- maybe when you get up to 400#, maybe just for giggles

I painted in new construction, re-do's ,commercial, industrial from 1977 thru 1991, even as a painter and Senior painter for the City of Los Angeles,

but when I had the chance to never have to sand anything ever again by becoming a Sewerage Treatment Operator ,
yeah, that was the *****. for 21 years!
Sanding, wood, steel, foundry's , ceilings, drywall, etc. really really , words fail me . .

That's why it's worth the cost / effort of better construction technique and tools, especially a router . .

AS for rounding edges with a hand plane,

why not post some pic of your technique and the resulting picture perfect edges we short-cut taken', time saving lazy-A$$ wood butchers
will all be envious of . . .

wonder how you'll do room treatments . . ?

The volt6's will really surprise you will clarity and quality.

I prefer Gorilla glue, has a faster tack.

practice your glue up / clamping/ stabilizing dry . . the glue will slide you of spec in a heartbeat

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post #8 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 11:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by asarose247 View Post
Sanding by hand -- maybe when you get up to 400#, maybe just for giggles

I painted in new construction, re-do's ,commercial, industrial from 1977 thru 1991, even as a painter and Senior painter for the City of Los Angeles,

but when I had the chance to never have to sand anything ever again by becoming a Sewerage Treatment Operator ,
yeah, that was the *****. for 21 years!
Sanding, wood, steel, foundry's , ceilings, drywall, etc. really really , words fail me . .

That's why it's worth the cost / effort of better construction technique and tools, especially a router . .

AS for rounding edges with a hand plane,

why not post some pic of your technique and the resulting picture perfect edges we short-cut taken', time saving lazy-A$$ wood butchers
will all be envious of . . .

wonder how you'll do room treatments . . ?

The volt6's will really surprise you will clarity and quality.

I prefer Gorilla glue, has a faster tack.

practice your glue up / clamping/ stabilizing dry . . the glue will slide you of spec in a heartbeat
I don't quite understand your comment regarding sanding. My first DIY project was a subwoofer, and I sanded it by hand before using a primer and then paint. It's not the smoothest paint at all, you can feel some bumps when you touch it across, but it's not bad to my eyes at all.

As for "my" hand plane technique, here's the video that inspired me to do it this way:

A router would be nice, but I won't spend $150 on a tool just to get roundovers. If I fail with the hand plane, I'll settle for simple chamfered edges like here:

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post #9 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 12:17 PM
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looks very neat . . ., a keen eye and a steady hand . .

The Physics of acoustics aside,

one primary fundamental of music /HT :compromise -we all do it

Sanding? necessary, usually, YMMV

but not anywhere as rewarding as Sewerage Treatment -we all need it

keep everybody postd up . we love the pics

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post #10 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by YonathanZ View Post

I was thinking of doing the sanding (by hand) at the balcony of the apartment.
If you could sand by hand in this space, why could't you just use a small powered sander there too? Then you could also use a palm router there. The router will give you consistent and extremely quick results compared to a hand plane.

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post #11 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by YonathanZ View Post
A router, not to mention a table saw, cannot be used in the average apartment. My plan is to buy kits with a front baffle, so I won't need a router. I can use my jigsaw to cut a rectangle for the rear cable plugs.

The hand plane will be used to round corners, instead of a router.
Poor mans table saw, perfect if you dont have room for a table saw:

2-C-type vice grips
1-10' 13/16" piece of uni-strut
circular saw.


Clamp the strut to the wood minus the distance from the edge of the saw base plate guide to blade (usually 1.5"). You will make perfectly straight cuts every time.


Oh, and a router is for much more than just rounding corners.

~JH
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post #12 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 04:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, a router does a lot more than round corners. And a powered sander is nice. So is cutting my own board with a circular saw. Thing is, I'm trying not to spend too much.
I might acquire more powered tools in time, the first one will probably be a circular saw, but for now it's all about making do with what I have (or with cheap, manual tools).

Last edited by YonathanZ; 03-19-2017 at 12:45 AM.
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post #13 of 30 Old 03-18-2017, 06:28 PM
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I don't quite understand your comment regarding sanding. My first DIY project was a subwoofer, and I sanded it by hand before using a primer and then paint. It's not the smoothest paint at all, you can feel some bumps when you touch it across, but it's not bad to my eyes at all.

Hi there again,

Good on you believe & do it how it suits YOU!
Sanding becomes easy if you do use / make up some of your own tools (not realy a tool, BUT) buy a 2", 3" width sanding paper roll and make up an MDF board (wood) short one, long one simple again what suits the job & glue or even stable (sides only of course) the Sandpaper on to it - perfectly easy to use and most of all NO bumps etc.
I use these all the times from 10" to over 3' and I'm getting perfect smooth surfaces for painting my MDF keeping in mind that I never use a plane piece of wood only slices joint together & the sufaces are dead strait not noticing that the ubit is made up as a sandwich type. Just put some elbow grease into it and some filler & most of all high rise filler to get the best ..............

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post #14 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 12:47 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi there again,

Good on you believe & do it how it suits YOU!
Sanding becomes easy if you do use / make up some of your own tools (not realy a tool, BUT) buy a 2", 3" width sanding paper roll and make up an MDF board (wood) short one, long one simple again what suits the job & glue or even stable (sides only of course) the Sandpaper on to it - perfectly easy to use and most of all NO bumps etc.
I use these all the times from 10" to over 3' and I'm getting perfect smooth surfaces for painting my MDF keeping in mind that I never use a plane piece of wood only slices joint together & the sufaces are dead strait not noticing that the ubit is made up as a sandwich type. Just put some elbow grease into it and some filler & most of all high rise filler to get the best ..............

rgs UpperCut
Yeah, I have this tool that I used on my first project, it cost me $10 and made sanding a lot easier. It looks like this, only without the handle:
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post #15 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 01:31 AM
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Yeah, I have this tool that I used on my first project, it cost me $10 and made sanding a lot easier. It looks like this, only without the handle:
I have some of the very same item as on the photo yet I srew them to a MDF board as that works well - yet if you use the MDF you have more area and it works much better!

rgs UpperCut
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post #16 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 01:44 AM - Thread Starter
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I have some of the very same item as on the photo yet I srew them to a MDF board as that works well - yet if you use the MDF you have more area and it works much better!

rgs UpperCut
That's not a bad idea at all, but how do you grip the MDF piece, since it's just a flat piece? Did you attach a handle to it?
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post #17 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 05:59 AM
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That's not a bad idea at all, but how do you grip the MDF piece, since it's just a flat piece? Did you attach a handle to it?
Both ways, either with or without a type of handle like on the last Image!
Say 18 mm flat piece MDF is thick enough to handle (grap) it with bar hand, and otherwise srew the plate to it as the same as in that Image or just another block type piece of wood or even another plate MDF smaller in size! Just try it out it will be easy to understand once used.

I use my long boards for example (as in 3' - 1 meter piece) just with my two hands or I have one handle or two on it as requiered by the size of the enclosure & the extend of the work intended. With that kind of tool you can do some real work, and it will be dead strait as well.

rgs UpperCut
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post #18 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 06:03 AM - Thread Starter
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That's neat. I just don't have any wood laying around to come up with my own tools, though.
That's why buying proper tools makes sense for me.
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post #19 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 06:34 AM
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I've only had a router for less than a year but I'm not sure how I lived without it. VERY useful tool. It saves lots of time and comes in handy more than you'd guess.

Also if you want a nice finish, good random orbital sanders can be had for less than a hundred bucks. Cheapos for under 50. Big time saver over doing anything by hand.

I rip sheets with a circular saw, piece of square tube and c-clamps. This could be cobbled together for 50 bucks.

Last, a compressor and finish nailer. You don't need one so save up while you do other projects but again the time saving and convenience pay for themselves.
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post #20 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 09:48 AM
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A thought about dowels:

Sufficiently glued joints are extremely strong and I'm not sure the dowels would make that much of a difference, especially on the scale of a Volt 6/8. There are 18" subwoofer box builds using nothing but wood glue and masking tape (in place of clamps).
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post #21 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 10:55 AM - Thread Starter
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A thought about dowels:

Sufficiently glued joints are extremely strong and I'm not sure the dowels would make that much of a difference, especially on the scale of a Volt 6/8. There are 18" subwoofer box builds using nothing but wood glue and masking tape (in place of clamps).
You're right. My 12" sub doesn't use anything but glue, either. Not everything I bought is for speaker cabinets though, it's for general use. I'm going to build some stands soon, so I think I'll use dowels there.

Guys, what do you think of this sander?

https://www.azrieli.com/o/e0197f98-9...c-b9b90913f28b

140W
11000 RPM
The model is "FIX Electric 9960". Nothing you'd find on Google.
$30 bucks with shipping.

Next in price is a Worx WX652.1, which is $73. It's orbital, but I don't feel like spending this much on a sander.

Your thoughts?

Edit: Also, for lacquer, do I need to sand the surface, when using pine for example?

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You'd be better served with the Worx random orbital (ROS) over the FIX orbital sander (OS). The OS is suitable for lighter work, but the ROS can do heavier work and lighter as well. If it was me I think I'd rather sand by hand and save up for a more versatile tool, the ROS.

And as for sanding for before lacquer - if you want it nice and smooth you'll be sanding before and between coats.

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post #23 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 12:40 PM - Thread Starter
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You'd be better served with the Worx random orbital (ROS) over the FIX orbital sander (OS). The OS is suitable for lighter work, but the ROS can do heavier work and lighter as well. If it was me I think I'd rather sand by hand and save up for a more versatile tool, the ROS.

And as for sanding for before lacquer - if you want it nice and smooth you'll be sanding before and between coats.
Could you please explain what you mean by "heavier work"?
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post #24 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 02:18 PM
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That it can remove more material faster, and more evenly to boot.
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post #25 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 04:09 PM
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Guys, what do you think of this sander?
I'd get a Skil. I used a $30 one like this to sand my 24' boat stem to stern 7 times. Not to mention a ton of other projects. Still going strong. My circular saw is a cheap Skil and so is one of my routers. No problems. Here's a reconditioned Skil circular saw. With less powerful saws just take your time. Don't forget to get a plywood (small tooth) blade for smoother cuts. Most saws only come with a ripping blade.

Look on YouTube for homemade circular saw track jig for straight cuts. Two pieces of straight wood, some screws and you're good to go. A jig saw with a circle attachment can cut large circles. A hole saw can cut smaller circles (just keep backing it out ... don't let it keep burning). I used a $16 Harbor Freight hole saw kit to cut holes in my fiberglass boat (the top, not the bottom ), Starboard (for speakers) and wood. Don't go all the way through when using a hole saw. Turn it over, stick the drill bit through the center hole and finish the hole. Keeps the back from splintering.

A plunge router with a circle jig is the best tool for recessed mounting.

Good luck with that hand plane. I seriously doubt if you can get it smooth ... and one chunk and it's all over. And if you're using MDF I have no idea how it'll behave on that. Try it on scrap first.
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post #26 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 04:30 PM - Thread Starter
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I'd get a Skil. I used a $30 one like this to sand my 24' boat stem to stern 7 times. Not to mention a ton of other projects. Still going strong. My circular saw is a cheap Skil and so is one of my routers. No problems. Here's a reconditioned Skil circular saw. With less powerful saws just take your time. Don't forget to get a plywood (small tooth) blade for smoother cuts. Most saws only come with a ripping blade.

Look on YouTube for homemade circular saw track jig for straight cuts. Two pieces of straight wood, some screws and you're good to go. A jig saw with a circle attachment can cut large circles. A hole saw can cut smaller circles (just keep backing it out ... don't let it keep burning). I used a $16 Harbor Freight hole saw kit to cut holes in my fiberglass boat (the top, not the bottom ), Starboard (for speakers) and wood. Don't go all the way through when using a hole saw. Turn it over, stick the drill bit through the center hole and finish the hole. Keeps the back from splintering.

A plunge router with a circle jig is the best tool for recessed mounting.

Good luck with that hand plane. I seriously doubt if you can get it smooth ... and one chunk and it's all over. And if you're using MDF I have no idea how it'll behave on that. Try it on scrap first.
I'm not from the US so all those links are irrelevant to me, but thanks.
The cheapest random orbital sander where I live is around $70 so I'll skip it for now.
I doubt I'll need to do a lot of sanding for my speaker stands, and speaker cabinets are at least a few months away, by then I'll be ready to spend a bit more on tools.
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post #27 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YonathanZ View Post
A router, not to mention a table saw, cannot be used in the average apartment. My plan is to buy kits with a front baffle, so I won't need a router. I can use my jigsaw to cut a rectangle for the rear cable plugs.

The hand plane will be used to round corners, instead of a router.
I would never suggest for you to use them "in" an apartment, but I know people that live in apartments and can use them outside. I didn't realize I'd have to explain that. I don't even use my router inside my garage, I use it outside because even with a vacuum it's too messy.

Builds: Maelstrom 21 Ottoman Build, Dual Opposed MFW's x 2, Statements, SEOS-12/TD12M x 5. Home Theater
On-deck: Finalists, The AviaTrix (soundbar), Statement II's, UM18x4
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post #28 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 06:18 PM
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As explained by an experienced carpenter-

"Yes, I can do the job for a lot cheaper, especially if you like a natural hammer tone finish . . . I just beat it into the shape you want . . ."

DONE!

DIY FAN Denon X5200 , ATI A 2000 for 7.4.6 SCATMOS/DSU Sammy 82" 4K/HDR
L/R: Fusion 15 V2 , C: 88 Special , SL/SR: 88 Special(V2) , RL/RR: F-3, TF/TR: Volt 6's TM: SLX, FH: F4Q4
SUBMAXIMUS, ,Submaximus V3,LOWARHORNCustom Dual Driver VBSS,2 x 6000DSP
www.avsforum.com/forum/155-diy-speakers-subs/1485120-submaximus-large-front-loaded-horn
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/155-di...orn-build.html
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post #29 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 06:52 PM
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borrowed from the "removing a drive thread"

Beat to shape, paint to match . .
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DIY FAN Denon X5200 , ATI A 2000 for 7.4.6 SCATMOS/DSU Sammy 82" 4K/HDR
L/R: Fusion 15 V2 , C: 88 Special , SL/SR: 88 Special(V2) , RL/RR: F-3, TF/TR: Volt 6's TM: SLX, FH: F4Q4
SUBMAXIMUS, ,Submaximus V3,LOWARHORNCustom Dual Driver VBSS,2 x 6000DSP
www.avsforum.com/forum/155-diy-speakers-subs/1485120-submaximus-large-front-loaded-horn
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/155-di...orn-build.html
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post #30 of 30 Old 03-19-2017, 10:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgwalsh View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by YonathanZ View Post
A router, not to mention a table saw, cannot be used in the average apartment. My plan is to buy kits with a front baffle, so I won't need a router. I can use my jigsaw to cut a rectangle for the rear cable plugs.

The hand plane will be used to round corners, instead of a router.
I would never suggest for you to use them "in" an apartment, but I know people that live in apartments and can use them outside. I didn't realize I'd have to explain that. I don't even use my router inside my garage, I use it outside because even with a vacuum it's too messy.
I'll be using the balcony with the glass door closed, so nothing will get inside.

Last edited by YonathanZ; 03-21-2017 at 12:40 AM.
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