Canon HF11 -- best settings?? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-18-2008, 10:53 AM - Thread Starter
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I'm new the this forum and just bought a Canon HF11. I've done preliminary tests with it today and am disappointed with the results. I'm assuming I must not have the Settings set correctly.

Can anyone coach me on what settings yield the absolute best results, assuming good lighting conditions.

Second, can anyone tell me the best settings when in lower light situations. I'm filming my daughters ballet tonight (which is part of why I bought the camera) and I have heard that the 24fps setting is actually not as good in low lighting, but i'm not quite sure what I'm doing yet. Thanks!
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-18-2008, 12:11 PM
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How are you disappointed with the results?
24P might be the best setting for low light because the camera will slow the frame rate down to 12fps as needed, whereas with the other modes it will not.
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post #3 of 12 Old 10-18-2008, 02:15 PM - Thread Starter
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I have been monkeying around a bit today. I found that I had it in the i60 (or 60i?) setting. I am new to the camcorder HD stuff. Once I found this setting, I set it to 24fps, which I understand is the best. Though I haven't shot a lot yet at 24, it looks MUCH better than my 60i results, so I'm on my way to being satisfied.

Also, though I'm assuming it's yet another setting, when I'm panning around with the camera and then watching it in playback on my computer, the panning is fairly edgy and not that smooth.

As I was buying it, I read something where I thought someone said that in low light, the camera actually does better at 30fps? Ever heard of this.

Related to the whole 24fps piece, part of what was confusing me until I found the 60i / 30fps/24fps screen is the setting screen for 24mpx, 17mpx, etc. I was setting it at 24mpx, the top one, and since it said 24, I was assuming it was the setting for the frame per second, but later figured out it was not. Do you know what the MPX / FPX / XP+ settings are for, and whether there's any ideal setting for indoors with relatively low light (ballet tonight)? Thanks.
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post #4 of 12 Old 10-18-2008, 04:03 PM - Thread Starter
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For what it's worth, I just finished some more experimenting. It seems that the 24F setting is the best in all the situations I've tried. Main thing I've been looking at right now is low, incandescent light, and which settings have less grain. I found that the EASY setting seemed to have the best colors, but had more grain. I then found, am planning to use tonight, that when I left it on 24F, with the P setting (auto) and AWB auto whitebalance, BUT lowered to XP+ (12mbps) setting, it seems slightly better and less grainy than the MPX (24mbps) setting. I don't really understand what this setting is. I had expected that the only setting I'd have and manage would be the Frame rate. Still learning, including the terminology, etc.
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-18-2008, 08:40 PM
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these cheap camcorders are very noisy if the light is marginal... 24p gives you more light in the picture, but you'll have to deal with the jerky movement... it's a tradeoff, and personally, 24p would be the last thing i'd use.

you want to shoot with 24Mbps, if you value the quality of the picture... more bitrate is always preferable... hopefully you are evaluating the picture on an hd big screen, not the computer.

where you can experiment is with shutter priority and aperture priority... if you play the footage back in the camera, it'll give you the aperture settings in real time, on the lcd screen as the footage plays.

in the still camera world, we know that the widest aperture will let the most light in, so run it all the way open... the widest aperture will be the smallest number, the camera will then set the shutter speed and the iso automatically... the drawback there is that any shutter speed under about 1/60th of a second can look pretty blurry.


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post #6 of 12 Old 10-19-2008, 05:34 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the input. I have some research to do in order to come up to speed on the terms. At this stage, I'm really not sure of the distinction between, for example, what the MBPS (24, 17, 12) term and setting is vs the F (24, 30, 60i) really is. I have a general idea, but I don't yet really get it.

On the still side, I'm an avid photographer. D300. 400mm 2.8 lens. Fully understand the relationship if ISO, Shutter and Aperture. Use manual Kelvin White Balance settings, etc.

But until I understand exactly what the variables on this digital camera are about, I'm experimenting a bit blindly.

As an aside, I have the MacPro and 30" HD Monitor, so thus far, that's what I've been viewing on. I'm assuming it is giving me a very good representation of my results. I haven't viewed the footage yet, but last night I ended up using the Auto (P) setting, along with the XP+ 12MBPS setting.

Given my comments above, is there a simple tutorial or resource somewhere that gives me a lesson in the various settings and their role re: the HD camcorder context?
thanks,
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post #7 of 12 Old 10-19-2008, 05:37 AM - Thread Starter
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And, by the way, I had the camera on 24F the whole time. OSV --- in your comment re: "24p would be the last thing you would use", are you referring to 24mbps? Or are you refering to the 24F frame rate? Re: the mbps setting, is the rule of thumb that the higher mbps setting makes the picture jerkier, as you commented? Thanks.
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post #8 of 12 Old 10-19-2008, 06:01 AM
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24 mbps means 24 mega bits per second, that's the amount of picture data the camcorder writes to the SDHC chip, so the higher the better (more picture detail). For example, I have the Canon HF10 and my highest setting is 17 mbps.

As for 24p 30p, etc, that's the frame rate (fps). So if you set your cam to 24p and Cinematic mode, it will mimic movie films. When you have low lighting you may want to experiment with it and 30p mode. I normally shoot in 30p meaning 30 frames per second Progressive instead of 60 frames per second Interlaced (60i).

If you want to try something really neat, take some footage at these differeant frame rates and plug the SDHC chip into a large TV that supports 1080p (most do these days) and watch the footage, it's amazing. If you don't have a tv like that go down to a store like Best Buy and plug it into one of their's (try a 65" Panasonic plasma). They have a 1 to 1 pixel match to the Canon HF camcorders.
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post #9 of 12 Old 10-20-2008, 07:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osv View Post

these cheap camcorders are very noisy if the light is marginal... 24p gives you more light in the picture, but you'll have to deal with the jerky movement... it's a tradeoff, and personally, 24p would be the last thing i'd use.

cheap? Ok, Mr Warren Buffet

I have a fever and the only cure is more Blu-Ray....
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post #10 of 12 Old 10-20-2008, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ3118 View Post

cheap? Ok, Mr Warren Buffet

lol... it certainly didn't feel cheap when my credit card bill came in!!


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post #11 of 12 Old 10-22-2008, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osv View Post

lol... it certainly didn't feel cheap when my credit card bill came in!!

lol

I have a fever and the only cure is more Blu-Ray....
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post #12 of 12 Old 12-16-2009, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osv View Post

these cheap camcorders are very noisy if the light is marginal

Nice pretending
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