Need to buy a new Video Recorder - Please help - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 05-01-2012, 06:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi,

I have my own business and i need to start making some you tube videos for use on the site to promote products and for use with the blog. My company sells energy saving LED light bulbs, so i'm going to use the camera for video the lights in use. So from off to on, and then the dimmable ones to record the varying different lighting levels of the bulbs. This is very important for my usage and don't know if any specific cameras will do this better than others.

1) Easy to use (point and shoot) and upload onto YouTube (im bad with computers )
2) Be relatively small
3) Don't really want to spend more than £250
4) Good battery life
5) Easy to upload onto editing software on my Mac (when i work out how all that works).
6) Have a slot for an external mic

I really am lost with all the options out there. I've been told to go Sony or Canon, but this means a higher budget?

I have also been told about the Zoom Q3HD for £180 ???

If anyone can point me in the right direction, i'd really appreciate it

Chris
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post #2 of 7 Old 05-01-2012, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by londonguy View Post

If anyone can point me in the right direction, i'd really appreciate it

Chris,

Welcome to the forum! I visited London as a tourist last year and loved it. Maybe I ran into you somewhere!

I'll try to help.

1) Easy to use (point and shoot) and upload onto YouTube (im bad with computers )
-- All the current small Canon, Sonys and Panasonics are easy to use. They have an "intelegent automatic" setting that gets it right most of the time. However, if you are trying to shoot light bulb intensity changes, you may have to use manual lens and shutter settings that won't automatically adjust to the changing light. They all come with software that moves your video files to your computer, if it's a Windows PC. With a Mac, YouTube makes it easy and quick to learn after you file for an account. You'll learn it in 5 minutes or less.
2) Be relatively small
--All P&S (Point and Shoot) cameras are pocket sized, unless you spend for big zoom capability.
3) Don't really want to spend more than £250
--Should be easy. My favorite small video camera is a Sony HX9V that, while it is now being replaced by newer models from Sony, is still available on Amazon UK for your price: Sony HX9V on Amazon UK. It is small, highly regarded in many reviews, has the software to make YouTube easy, takes very high quality HD video, has enough manual controls to record changing light intensity and records good 2 channel stereo sound. It has many similar competitors.
4) Good battery life
--The small P&S cameras, including the HX9V will do around a full hour or more of continuous video. An extra battery fixes any shortcomings on battery life.
5) Easy to upload onto editing software on my Mac (when i work out how all that works).
--Look for cameras that use SD Cards for memory. Most do now, including the HX9V. You pull the card out of the camera and plug it into your computer or a cheap card reader in a USB port. The other way is to plug the camera into the computer with a USB cord that, normally, comes with the camera. Either way, you copy the files to your computer and iMovie will do the work. If iMovie does not appeal to you, I can recommend Adobe Premier Elements 10 for Mac.
6) Have a slot for an external mic
--That is the hard part. External mics don't often show up on lower priced camcorders. Whenever that comes up on this forum, there normally are no good suggestions. The HX9V does not. The lowest priced current camera that I know of that has an external mic and gets solid reviews is the Panasonic FZ150 (here at Amazon UK. It is a little bigger and has a lot of features you would probably not need.

You mentioned the Zoom Q3HD. I know nothing about that camera, but it might work very well for YouTube work.

Why do you need an external mic for YouTube videos?

Bill
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post #3 of 7 Old 05-02-2012, 04:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by bsprague View Post

Chris,

Welcome to the forum! I visited London as a tourist last year and loved it. Maybe I ran into you somewhere!

I'll try to help.

1) Easy to use (point and shoot) and upload onto YouTube (im bad with computers )
-- All the current small Canon, Sonys and Panasonics are easy to use. They have an "intelegent automatic" setting that gets it right most of the time. However, if you are trying to shoot light bulb intensity changes, you may have to use manual lens and shutter settings that won't automatically adjust to the changing light. They all come with software that moves your video files to your computer, if it's a Windows PC. With a Mac, YouTube makes it easy and quick to learn after you file for an account. You'll learn it in 5 minutes or less.
2) Be relatively small
--All P&S (Point and Shoot) cameras are pocket sized, unless you spend for big zoom capability.
3) Don't really want to spend more than £250
--Should be easy. My favorite small video camera is a Sony HX9V that, while it is now being replaced by newer models from Sony, is still available on Amazon UK for your price: Sony HX9V on Amazon UK. It is small, highly regarded in many reviews, has the software to make YouTube easy, takes very high quality HD video, has enough manual controls to record changing light intensity and records good 2 channel stereo sound. It has many similar competitors.
4) Good battery life
--The small P&S cameras, including the HX9V will do around a full hour or more of continuous video. An extra battery fixes any shortcomings on battery life.
5) Easy to upload onto editing software on my Mac (when i work out how all that works).
--Look for cameras that use SD Cards for memory. Most do now, including the HX9V. You pull the card out of the camera and plug it into your computer or a cheap card reader in a USB port. The other way is to plug the camera into the computer with a USB cord that, normally, comes with the camera. Either way, you copy the files to your computer and iMovie will do the work. If iMovie does not appeal to you, I can recommend Adobe Premier Elements 10 for Mac.
6) Have a slot for an external mic
--That is the hard part. External mics don't often show up on lower priced camcorders. Whenever that comes up on this forum, there normally are no good suggestions. The HX9V does not. The lowest priced current camera that I know of that has an external mic and gets solid reviews is the Panasonic FZ150 It is a little bigger and has a lot of features you would probably not need.

You mentioned the Zoom Q3HD. I know nothing about that camera, but it might work very well for YouTube work.

Why do you need an external mic for YouTube videos?

Bill

Hi Bill

Really appreciate your comments. In fact a good friend of mine has said some similar things to you and said my only option would be the Panasonic FZ150 at £350

The videos i am shooting are for my new website which is why the quality of picture and sound need to be spot on without going crazy on price. One vid is for the homepage where i will be giving an introduction to the company, then on the product pages there will be videos of the products being used. As i sell lighting products, i need to show the products being turned on and off. So very dark light to very bright light very very quickly. So i'm told i A manual exposure is vital, which is also another reason to go for the FZ150. Tried doing a vid on my iphone 4S and you can see how it just doesn't work;
(not allowed to post URL's)

I also want to update my blog with some video content. I've invested in a screen, some good lighting and now just need the camera and external mic.

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post #4 of 7 Old 05-02-2012, 09:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by londonguy View Post

... So i'm told i A manual exposure is vital, which is also another reason to go for the FZ150. Tried doing a vid on my iphone 4S and you can see how it just doesn't work;
(not allowed to post URL's)

I also want to update my blog with some video content. I've invested in a screen, some good lighting and now just need the camera and external mic.


There is another brit who has requested advice too. His thread is http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1408350

In it I answered with the following: "Consider the Panasonic FZ-150. A brit named Graham Houghton has done an 8 part YouTube training series on it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41NJJ3Nc0BE. dpreview has given it a "silver award": http://www.dpreview.com/products/pan...sonic_dmcfz150 The UK Amazon store shows 9 out of 10 customers giving it 5 stars. If you google around a little you should see that it seems to be a well liked video camera as well as doing quality stills. It has an eyepiece viewfinder and mic input. It might be the lowest priced camcorder/camera that has those."

In your case, full manual control may be necessary. Few camcorders have that, but it appears the FZ150 does. You can verify the use of manual controls shooting video in operating instructions with the link on the bottom of this page: http://www.panasonic.co.uk/html/en_G...?view=&angle=5
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post #5 of 7 Old 05-02-2012, 10:48 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsprague View Post

There is another brit who has requested advice too. His thread is

In it I answered with the following: "Consider the Panasonic FZ-150. A brit named Graham Houghton has done an 8 part YouTube training series on it dpreview has given it a "silver award": The UK Amazon store shows 9 out of 10 customers giving it 5 stars. If you google around a little you should see that it seems to be a well liked video camera as well as doing quality stills. It has an eyepiece viewfinder and mic input. It might be the lowest priced camcorder/camera that has those."

In your case, full manual control may be necessary. Few camcorders have that, but it appears the FZ150 does. You can verify the use of manual controls shooting video in operating instructions with the link on the bottom of this page: ]

Wow, thanks ! Perfect information and it looks like i'm sold

PS - Had to delete all the URL's in your post or i wouldn't be allowed to reply.
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post #6 of 7 Old 05-02-2012, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by bsprague View Post

Chris,

Welcome to the forum! I visited London as a tourist last year and loved it. Maybe I ran into you somewhere!

I'll try to help.

1) Easy to use (point and shoot) and upload onto YouTube (im bad with computers )
-- All the current small Canon, Sonys and Panasonics are easy to use. They have an "intelegent automatic" setting that gets it right most of the time. However, if you are trying to shoot light bulb intensity changes, you may have to use manual lens and shutter settings that won't automatically adjust to the changing light. They all come with software that moves your video files to your computer, if it's a Windows PC. With a Mac, YouTube makes it easy and quick to learn after you file for an account. You'll learn it in 5 minutes or less.
2) Be relatively small
--All P&S (Point and Shoot) cameras are pocket sized, unless you spend for big zoom capability.

4) Good battery life
--The small P&S cameras, including the HX9V will do around a full hour or more of continuous video. An extra battery fixes any shortcomings on battery life.
5) Easy to upload onto editing software on my Mac (when i work out how all that works).
--Look for cameras that use SD Cards for memory. Most do now, including the HX9V. You pull the card out of the camera and plug it into your computer or a cheap card reader in a USB port. The other way is to plug the camera into the computer with a USB cord that, normally, comes with the camera. Either way, you copy the files to your computer and iMovie will do the work. If iMovie does not appeal to you, I can recommend Adobe Premier Elements 10 for Mac.


Bill

Have not too much to add to the above. I personally am using one of the Canon series and it does a good job for my purpose. I'm loading it through a standard usb cable connecting the camera to the computer and am copying the videos into the computer. One point to consider: I'm editing my videos in Windows Movie Maker but since my Canon does the videos in QuickTime format I had a problem: the videos used to come in fine to Movie Maker but without sound. I got around this by downloading and installing a utility called Im TOO Move converter (have no idea how secure it is), and it does an excellent job converting my videos properly. Now I have no problem getting them into Movie Maker with sound.
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post #7 of 7 Old 05-02-2012, 11:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by londonguy View Post

Hi,

I have my own business and i need to start making some you tube videos for use on the site to promote products and for use with the blog. My company sells energy saving LED light bulbs, so i'm going to use the camera for video the lights in use. So from off to on, and then the dimmable ones to record the varying different lighting levels of the bulbs. This is very important for my usage and don't know if any specific cameras will do this better than others.

1) Easy to use (point and shoot) and upload onto YouTube (im bad with computers )
2) Be relatively small
3) Don't really want to spend more than £250
4) Good battery life
5) Easy to upload onto editing software on my Mac (when i work out how all that works).
6) Have a slot for an external mic

I really am lost with all the options out there. I've been told to go Sony or Canon, but this means a higher budget?

I have also been told about the Zoom Q3HD for £180 ???

If anyone can point me in the right direction, i'd really appreciate it

Chris

Your lucky i read your thread Chris IE what video recorder to get all i can add is the FZ150s video is not too good in low light,outdoors its ok though,i hope it works out for you.Chris
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