AVCHD Editing - options and experiences - Page 31 - AVS Forum
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post #901 of 908 Old 12-24-2010, 07:16 AM
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The trick might also work with Sony Vegas if you keep your HD and matching SD material in two separate directories. Just rename the SD directory when you're done with your edits, and when Vegas loads and asks for the first replacement file, just point it to the appropriate file in the HD directory. It'll then find the rest of the replacement files automatically.
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post #902 of 908 Old 12-24-2010, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Francois Caron View Post

The trick might also work with Sony Vegas if you keep your HD and matching SD material in two separate directories. Just rename the SD directory when you're done with your edits, and when Vegas loads and asks for the first replacement file, just point it to the appropriate file in the HD directory. It'll then find the rest of the replacement files automatically.

This is exactly what i was thinking/ tried and it works...kind of. I say kind of because when i tried to create a lower quality version of the video i was trying to edit, it would lag in vegas and not play right with the audio. Not sure what program i should be using to make copies of the original video (i used Any video converter) for this instance.
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post #903 of 908 Old 12-24-2010, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by mkjetta08 View Post

This is exactly what i was thinking/ tried and it works...kind of. I say kind of because when i tried to create a lower quality version of the video i was trying to edit, it would lag in vegas and not play right with the audio. Not sure what program i should be using to make copies of the original video (i used Any video converter) for this instance.

Does Vegas have a "Batch Convert" in the 'tools' section? Something like that? Also note it might take a bit of time to convert, depending on how many and their length. If it will take some time, do what I do when I have a long rendering: Start it before you go to sleep and you'll wake up in the morning and it will be all done!
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post #904 of 908 Old 12-24-2010, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by mkjetta08 View Post

So is AVCHD comparable to a blu-ray? Or is it significantly worse? I used sony's software to create an AVCHD on a dvd and the quality was horrible on my TV.

AVCHD is a format derived from Blu-Ray for use on camcorders. On DVD, it's limited to 18Mb/s, which is about the practical media speed of a DVD run at 2x. Flash and HDD camcorders that use AVCHD format can go up to 24Mb/s by spec. If you put that on an Blu-Ray, it may not work right.

It probably does on a PS3, which apparently has always had a 2x speed Blu-Ray drive (the Blu-ray Profile 5, the "3D" profile, requires a 2x drive, and the PS3 was recently updated to support "3D", thus, it must be at least 2x), and presumably, better than 2x on DVD.

Of course, the max rate on Blu-ray is 40Mb/s... considerably faster than 17Mb/s. Blu-ray can look much better than AVCHD, but if you shoot in AVCHD and correctly put it on an AVCHD disc, it should look good.

If your originals are recorded on an AVCHD camcorder, you can drag the AVCHD file structure over from the camcorder and burn it directly to an AVCHD DVD to create a compliant disc. That will have the video from your camcorder unchanged. If you think that looks horrible, time for a new camcorder. If it looks good, then you need to figure out where in your toolchain the video went bad. You might also try the MultiAVC program.
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post #905 of 908 Old 12-24-2010, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by boxy View Post

For anyone having trouble editing AVCHD files due to lack of computer strength, here is a tip I learned.

Simply convert the files to a small SD version. The key is to leave them exactly as they are, same name and length but store them in a different folder.

That's the basic idea of what's called "proxy" editing. This has been used pretty much since computers started editing video. In fact, in the early days, it was mandatory -- early video editors like Adobe Premiere only ever edited via proxy, they always had to ingest your original video and spit out something the editor thought it could handle. Apple's Final Cut/iMovie still do some of this by default for modern video formats.

Some high-end video editors have this option built-in, others have add-ons that integrate it well. But the technique you describe here, or something similar, ought to work for just about any video editor.

There's a more modern version of using proxy files, too, called intermediate files. Basically, they treat things like AVCHD as a necessary evil to get everything to fit on small memory cards on a camcorder. But when you bring the video into the PC, you convert to something like Cineform, Apple's ProRes, Avid"s DNxHD, or just high quality MPEG-2. These will eat up 4-8x as much hard drive space, but they're much easier to edit, and you still get full high-def editing.
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post #906 of 908 Old 12-24-2010, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by hazydave View Post

AVCHD is a format derived from Blu-Ray for use on camcorders. On DVD, it's limited to 18Mb/s, which is about the practical media speed of a DVD run at 2x. Flash and HDD camcorders that use AVCHD format can go up to 24Mb/s by spec. If you put that on an Blu-Ray, it may not work right.

It probably does on a PS3, which apparently has always had a 2x speed Blu-Ray drive (the Blu-ray Profile 5, the "3D" profile, requires a 2x drive, and the PS3 was recently updated to support "3D", thus, it must be at least 2x), and presumably, better than 2x on DVD.

Of course, the max rate on Blu-ray is 40Mb/s... considerably faster than 17Mb/s. Blu-ray can look much better than AVCHD, but if you shoot in AVCHD and correctly put it on an AVCHD disc, it should look good.

If your originals are recorded on an AVCHD camcorder, you can drag the AVCHD file structure over from the camcorder and burn it directly to an AVCHD DVD to create a compliant disc. That will have the video from your camcorder unchanged. If you think that looks horrible, time for a new camcorder. If it looks good, then you need to figure out where in your toolchain the video went bad. You might also try the MultiAVC program.

Thank you for the very detailed reply!

I just got a Sony CX550 and it gives me a message stating if i shoot on 24mbps it cannot be burned into a AVCHD disc. If i do try that it says it needs to change the bit rate to a significantly lower amount and when it does burn a disc it looks like crap when played on a PS3 (on a Sony 52" Bravia)

With that said it say that if it is burned onto a blu-ray disc, then no "compression" is required.

(i have only used the default dvd burning program that came with PMB)

Maybe Nero 10 will do better?
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post #907 of 908 Old 12-25-2010, 05:01 AM
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Originally Posted by hazydave View Post

AVCHD is a format derived from Blu-Ray for use on camcorders. On DVD, it's limited to 18Mb/s, which is about the practical media speed of a DVD run at 2x. Flash and HDD camcorders that use AVCHD format can go up to 24Mb/s by spec. If you put that on an Blu-Ray, it may not work right.

It probably does on a PS3, which apparently has always had a 2x speed Blu-Ray drive (the Blu-ray Profile 5, the "3D" profile, requires a 2x drive, and the PS3 was recently updated to support "3D", thus, it must be at least 2x), and presumably, better than 2x on DVD.

Of course, the max rate on Blu-ray is 40Mb/s... considerably faster than 17Mb/s. Blu-ray can look much better than AVCHD, but if you shoot in AVCHD and correctly put it on an AVCHD disc, it should look good.

If your originals are recorded on an AVCHD camcorder, you can drag the AVCHD file structure over from the camcorder and burn it directly to an AVCHD DVD to create a compliant disc. That will have the video from your camcorder unchanged. If you think that looks horrible, time for a new camcorder. If it looks good, then you need to figure out where in your toolchain the video went bad. You might also try the MultiAVC program.

I have burned HD mpegs (25mbs) to standard DVDs in the AVCHD format at 18 mbs and they do look very good. Limited space, yes, but until the price of blu-ray burners and discs come down a bit more I am quite content.
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post #908 of 908 Old 12-25-2010, 06:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxy View Post

I have burned HD mpegs (25mbs) to standard DVDs in the AVCHD format at 18 mbs and they do look very good. Limited space, yes, but until the price of blu-ray burners and discs come down a bit more I am quite content.

I used to do this as well and it served well at the time. But Blu Ray prices HAVE ALREADY dropped to affordable prices. You can get disks for as low as $2 each and burners are now less than $90. It's a little hard to believe they will drop much more.

Hi def on DVD is an 'iffy' situation given that some machines play it and some don't. The safer bet these days is producing a true Blu Ray disk.... which of course plays in ANY Bly Ray player.
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