Remote control fireplace. - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 12-30-2011, 03:50 PM - Thread Starter
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I've been looking for an IR controlled solution to controlling the two enclosed gas-only fireplaces in my house. Currently each fireplace can be turned on or off with a simple wall switch. As far as I can tell, there's nothing different about these switches compared to every other light switch in the house. It just controls a relay under the fireplace, which in turn controls the gas valve and spark. The size of the fire is controlled manually with a flow dial, the wall switch just turns it off/on. So can I just replace this wall switch with any IR controlled switch? The remote controlled fireplace kits I've found seem to include a lot of equipment I already have and seem to be designed for retrofits. Thanks for any help.
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post #2 of 7 Old 01-01-2012, 09:15 PM
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If your fireplace gas valve runs off millivolt system then you can use something like this....

http://www.smarthome.com/91371/Skyte...-Remote/p.aspx
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post #3 of 7 Old 01-01-2012, 10:11 PM
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Your issue with IR will be there probably isn't line voltage in the box to power a "ir switch" like a spacer from lutron you get at lowes or similar supply chain. What you need is a dry contact relay type device. You do not want any voltage to bleed over to the millivolt system. There are several RF systems out, like above post, and you can customize your own set up. You just do not want to add or remove voltage to the existing set up, and a regular IR switch requires line voltage and will bleed. I have used a 110v controllable non dimming light switch controlled by a system, to activate a dry contact 110v Ac contact. So when 110 volts from switch is applied to the contact, it closes a set of dry contacts. This works very well, but I had access to line voltage, etc. this is an option though. If you have line voltage, get an IR spacer switch (do not dim) and proper relay and set it up. Otherwise maybe a google search finds specific options, as I am not aware of any other IR options. Good Luck and keep us posted.
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post #4 of 7 Old 01-02-2012, 09:17 AM
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Due to safety issues, we will only control fireplaces from a fixed inwall touchpanel. Don't want to turn on the fireplace and light Fluffy into a torch running around your house!

Greg C.
www.pghcustomht.com
CEDIA University Designer CAT Member
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post #5 of 7 Old 01-03-2012, 12:02 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies, guys. I guess the first thing I'm going to need to do is pull this switch off the wall and inspect the wiring behind it. I have a suspician that there's nothing special about this switch, and that it simply sends an on/off signal to the relay below the fireplace. But, given that I could be completely wrong, clearly I need to investigate. As for the safety of having a remote fireplace in the first place, I can see how that would be a problem for some. In our case, we have three kids under 4 yrs. old in the house, two of which have figured out how to turn on the fire with the light switch. I would feel a lot more comfortable if I could block the switch from them and set the remote away elsewhere. The second fireplace (same setup) is in the media room. Would be nice to have control over it from my Harmony One since we often use the fireplace to bump up the temp a few degrees in the winter and then turn it off when starting a movie. Anyway, I'll report back what I find out. Thanks!
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post #6 of 7 Old 01-03-2012, 10:48 AM
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We've encountered a few different methods of operating fireplaces.
1.
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post #7 of 7 Old 01-03-2012, 10:52 AM
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Sorry

We've encountered a few different methods of operating fireplaces.

1. Milivolt (like above) where the switch just closes to allow dis-similar metals to provide a very slight (milivolt) voltage to start the fire going.
2. 12 or 24 volt wiring, where the switch just closes to allow a low voltage transformer to start the fire going.
3. 120v wiring, where the switch closes a 120v connection, and there is a 12 or 24 volt transformer in the base of the firepalce that allows the fire to start.

You should carefully determine which you have.
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