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post #1 of 8 Old 09-20-2017, 07:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Nest for mini split AC

Can anyone of you help me with connecting a Nest thermostat to a mini split AC? I just bought a DuctlessAire 2 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz. I would like to connect this to Nest. How do I connect? What interface do I need?
Please advice..
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post #2 of 8 Old 09-20-2017, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by jackforceus View Post
Can anyone of you help me with connecting a Nest thermostat to a mini split AC? I just bought a DuctlessAire 2 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz. I would like to connect this to Nest. How do I connect? What interface do I need?
Please advice..
I cant help with your question but I have a question about the voltage rating - does 220V mean you have to pull a special electrical line to power this unit (since home power is 110V).
Thanks
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post #3 of 8 Old 09-21-2017, 08:32 AM
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I don't think you can. Those units don't use standard thermostat wiring. In fact, there's no wiring at all. The controller is RF.
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post #4 of 8 Old 09-21-2017, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ash Sharma View Post
I cant help with your question but I have a question about the voltage rating - does 220V mean you have to pull a special electrical line to power this unit (since home power is 110V).
Thanks
Home wiring (in the US) is 240/120. These units always require a dedicated circuit, they're not plug in units. A 240 line isn't really all that special. It's the same as used for more standard HVAC units, as well as cooktops, ovens, and dryers.
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post #5 of 8 Old 09-21-2017, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
Home wiring (in the US) is 240/120. These units always require a dedicated circuit, they're not plug in units. A 240 line isn't really all that special. It's the same as used for more standard HVAC units, as well as cooktops, ovens, and dryers.
Thanks
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post #6 of 8 Old 09-21-2017, 09:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Ash Sharma View Post
Thanks
Correct, You need to pull the 220 wiring from your main just like how you pulled for dryer, oven etc.

Coming to my main question, if I can connect the nest to mini split AC. It looks like the mini ac use milli-volts control and Nest uses 24V. If I can an interface / transformer to bridge that volts, then it might be possible correct?
Please see the link below:

http://ask.metafilter.com/305692/How...ir-conditioner
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post #7 of 8 Old 09-21-2017, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackforceus View Post
Coming to my main question, if I can connect the nest to mini split AC. It looks like the mini ac use milli-volts control and Nest uses 24V. If I can an interface / transformer to bridge that volts, then it might be possible correct?
Please see the link below:

http://ask.metafilter.com/305692/How...ir-conditioner
Almost anything is possible, if you're willing to throw enough time, money, and effort into it. Unless the maker of the HVAC unit has a specific kit to use a "standard" thermostat, it's going to be difficult.
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post #8 of 8 Old 09-25-2017, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ash Sharma View Post
I cant help with your question but I have a question about the voltage rating - does 220V mean you have to pull a special electrical line to power this unit (since home power is 110V).
Thanks
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
Home wiring (in the US) is 240/120. These units always require a dedicated circuit, they're not plug in units. A 240 line isn't really all that special. It's the same as used for more standard HVAC units, as well as cooktops, ovens, and dryers.
To expand you get three wires coming into your panel at a point in time these will be -120v, common, +120v

To get 240 you context to both hot and to get to 120 you take either hot and the common.

The electrician aims to balance loads to each side / phase of the board.
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