Sony MDR-V700DJ headphones - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 31 Old 02-01-2007, 06:26 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I am looking into purchasing this headphones mainly for listening music and
plugging it into my receiver to get a simulated surround. Are there any owners
there that can share their review for this product?

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 31 Old 03-12-2007, 01:27 AM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
These headphones are specifically for DJs and thus have unusually heavy bass - more bass than most any other headphone, in fact. If you want the subwoofers-in-the-trunk neighborhood-wide bass experience in your head, these are perfect, but for something more balanced, look elsewhere (in the same price range are Sony's MDR-7506s, which are a benchmark of balanced headphone audio and are the choice for most recording studios)
StarHalo is offline  
post #3 of 31 Old 03-12-2007, 02:41 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarHalo View Post

These headphones are specifically for DJs and thus have unusually heavy bass - more bass than most any other headphone, in fact. If you want the subwoofers-in-the-trunk neighborhood-wide bass experience in your head, these are perfect, but for something more balanced, look elsewhere (in the same price range are Sony's MDR-7506s, which are a benchmark of balanced headphone audio and are the choice for most recording studios)

Well I consider myself a bedroom DJ because I mix a lot of hip hop and a little bit of
alternative rock. I like the way the bass is because I have an equalizer in every source
I used this headphones with. I bought the MDR-V700DJ and it was the best headphones
I have used in my whole life, better than Bose especially isolating sound.
MDR-7506 is more of a studio monitor headphones.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #4 of 31 Old 03-25-2007, 10:12 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarHalo View Post

These headphones are specifically for DJs and thus have unusually heavy bass - more bass than most any other headphone, in fact. If you want the subwoofers-in-the-trunk neighborhood-wide bass experience in your head, these are perfect, but for something more balanced, look elsewhere (in the same price range are Sony's MDR-7506s, which are a benchmark of balanced headphone audio and are the choice for most recording studios)

I'll second what StarHalo said. If source replication as opposed to alteration is your goal, the MDR-7506 are a standard used for years. If you want to alter the sound do it with an EQ or tone contols, this way you'll know the original source's inherent sound quality (if you need to). Also, the MDRV6 is the equivalent consumer (non-professional) version of the 7506. I saw them recently at a Sony Style Store so I know they are still on the market and the only difference is gold plating on the jack or not (and they usually cost less). All other specs and qualities are identicle.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_MDR-7506

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there is no concept of "accounting for taste". We don't "pick" the level of bass any more than we get to pick the ending of a play. High fidelity is an unbiased, neutral, exact copy (or "reproduction") of the original source's tonal balance, timing, dynamics, etc..

m. zillch is online now  
post #5 of 31 Old 03-26-2007, 09:01 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post

I'll second what StarHalo said. If source replication as opposed to alteration is your goal, the MDR-7506 are a standard used for years. If you want to alter the sound do it with an EQ or tone contols, this way you'll know the original source's inherent sound quality (if you need to). Also, the MDRV6 is the equivalent consumer (non-professional) version of the 7506. I saw them recently at a Sony Style Store so I know they are still on the market and the only difference is gold plating on the jack or not (and they usually cost less). All other specs and qualities are identicle.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sony_MDR-7506

I just bought the MDR-V6 model for $45 from Sony Style refurbished. I plugged both
(V700DJ and V6) at the same amplifier playing a song @ 320kbps and all I hear different
is when a piano is stroked, V6 has more highs and V700DJ has more mid-range but
still has that piercing high not as good as V6s. Well I thought it was a bargain and I
still like V700DJ better and V6 is good too. Now I have an extra headphones to finalize
my tracks better.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #6 of 31 Old 03-26-2007, 09:15 PM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Good call. Mix the tracks with the V6s and then when you're done, enjoy the result with the V700DJs; that's an awesome setup.

Now all you need is a headphone amp
StarHalo is offline  
post #7 of 31 Old 03-27-2007, 10:32 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
You're kidding? Headphone amp? LOL I nearly went deaf went I went straight 1 hour blasting
the V700DJ and got a headache because of the bass is pounding my head. LOL

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #8 of 31 Old 03-27-2007, 11:44 AM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
A headphone amp isn't necessarily just for making things louder (though it can). Any source that has a headphone output has it's own little amplifier which provides power for your headphones, but as a rule, manufacturers skimp on this area in order to keep design complexity and cost reasonable. As a result, you actually miss out on some of what's being played back - every time a very low or high sound is played, or a piece with complex depth, the cheap low-power amp "runs out of gas" and just gives you a reasonable approximation of what was actually recorded. This means subtly rolled-off highs and lows, and a smaller soundstage.

But with a headphone amplifier, you're now driving the source signal with essentially limitless power, forcing your headphones to track every tiny waveform to the limits of their physical design. There's always power to spare to drive highest/lowest/most complex sounds - The bass drum that got drowned out and only hit hard in a few points in a track now hits exactly as hard, every time, for the entire song. The sampled sound that originally sounded lumped in with some other instruments in the center is now clearly just off to one side, where it's supposed to be. And so on.

This might all sound a bit strange, but note that in your own home theater system, you don't connect the sources directly to the speakers - you use an amplifier. The same technique works just as well with headphones. And recording studios *always* use headphone amps, so if you really want to hear it the way they did in the studio, it's a must-have.
StarHalo is offline  
post #9 of 31 Old 03-27-2007, 12:30 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarHalo View Post

A headphone amp isn't necessarily just for making things louder (though it can). Any source that has a headphone output has it's own little amplifier which provides power for your headphones, but as a rule, manufacturers skimp on this area in order to keep design complexity and cost reasonable. As a result, you actually miss out on some of what's being played back - every time a very low or high sound is played, or a piece with complex depth, the cheap low-power amp "runs out of gas" and just gives you a reasonable approximation of what was actually recorded. This means subtly rolled-off highs and lows, and a smaller soundstage.

But with a headphone amplifier, you're now driving the source signal with essentially limitless power, forcing your headphones to track every tiny waveform to the limits of their physical design. There's always power to spare to drive highest/lowest/most complex sounds - The bass drum that got drowned out and only hit hard in a few points in a track now hits exactly as hard, every time, for the entire song. The sampled sound that originally sounded lumped in with some other instruments in the center is now clearly just off to one side, where it's supposed to be. And so on.

This might all sound a bit strange, but note that in your own home theater system, you don't connect the sources directly to the speakers - you use an amplifier. The same technique works just as well with headphones. And recording studios *always* use headphone amps, so if you really want to hear it the way they did in the studio, it's a must-have.

Well my mixer/turntables are amplified. If I do need a amplifier I would need it portable
in order to carry the same quality on the go. What would you recommend? I see Boostaroo
a good cost but don't know how it works.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #10 of 31 Old 03-27-2007, 01:04 PM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Anything by HeadRoom

http://www.headphone.com/products/headphone-amps/

I use the Micro Amp with the Desktop Module, it's just bigger than a pack of cards and can run on batteries (and their Mobile line is less than half that size)
StarHalo is offline  
post #11 of 31 Old 03-27-2007, 08:20 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 110
IMO, outboard headphone amps are only of potential benefit for devices where the variable output stage (adjustable by the product's volume control) can be totally bypassed . Such outputs are of course of fixed volume and are usually called "line out", "direct", "tape out", or "rec out". Only these kinds of outputs have the potential to have a cleaner sound quality that has not been tampered with by the tone control and volume control circuits of a poor quality internal preamp circuit. If the devices you want to listen too have no way to bypass their own tone (EQ)/volume controls, then an added outboard unit, even of perfect audiophile quality, has no benifit other than making louder the already adulterated signal. A perfect amp does nothing but gain (plays louder). It can't magically take away any added hum, hiss, distortion, or imaging problems that have already happened upstream. Does that make sense?

Also, I'll agree that Headroom is one of the top makers in this field and the first company I'd look at if I ever need one.

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there is no concept of "accounting for taste". We don't "pick" the level of bass any more than we get to pick the ending of a play. High fidelity is an unbiased, neutral, exact copy (or "reproduction") of the original source's tonal balance, timing, dynamics, etc..

m. zillch is online now  
post #12 of 31 Old 03-27-2007, 11:54 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
So basically if I buy this amplifier I will make my already 107dB headphones to gain 10dB?
90dB is suppose to the level of hearing loss if you continue to play it at long times. At 120dB
which is 3 more decibels if I added the amp is the threshold of pain. I barely get to 107dB because
I use AVLS on my MP3 player which you set to limit how loud the music is playing. I play my music
at only 95dB a limit of one song then rest for few minutes unless I am mixing songs but it doesn't
really affect the part of the hearing loss because there is more lower frequencies than it is high
frequencies. So my final decision is not to buy the amp. My eardrums already started to ache
whenever I listen to songs more than 4 minutes.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #13 of 31 Old 03-28-2007, 01:17 AM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Think of it this way: A source signal can have three different output paths from a given device -

1) signal - internal digital to analog converter - internal preamp - headphone out
2) signal - internal digital to analog converter - line out
3) signal - digital out

1 is least desirable because you're letting the source's built-in cheap amplifier and/or tone settings color the sound.
2 is nearly ideal, because you're bypassing everything from 1 and just sending a raw, untampered analog signal out, though some money is involved here as this is where the headphone amp comes in.
3 is absolutely perfect, because you're bypassing pretty much everything in the player, but here again more money is involved because you need your own digital to analog converter (HeadRoom sells these too!)

The idea behind all this is that you can take a very modestly priced source/player and turn it into something truly hi-fi simply by skipping whatever low-grade electronics the manufacturer bothered to include and substituting your own high-grade equipment. Using this method, you can easily build something for a few hundred dollars that sounds better than what some have paid a few thousand dollars for.

Of course if you're happy with what you've got, then it's a non-issue. Just turn off the AVLS (which also colors the sound) and don't listen at such loud volume levels (low frequency sounds can damage your ears just as much as high frequency). Good headphones are designed to be comfortable long-term, that means you should listen at a volume that allows long-term listening.
StarHalo is offline  
post #14 of 31 Old 03-28-2007, 10:30 AM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by like.no.other. View Post

My eardrums already started to ache
whenever I listen to songs more than 4 minutes.

Your body is trying to tell you to "STOP THAT!" So am I. Unless you want to wear hearing aids decades before most people do, you need to learn to appreciate music at lower levels. If after a listening session, music concert, night at the club, etc your ears ache, have "ringing" (tinnitus), or muffled perception, you're asking for guaranteed deafness in later life. Also, don't assume AVLS will protect you. With efficient headphones like the ones you use you can still do damage.

Some links for you:

http://www.cnet.com.au/mp3players/0,...0061084,00.htm
http://www.etymotic.com/pdf/er20-brochure.pdf

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there is no concept of "accounting for taste". We don't "pick" the level of bass any more than we get to pick the ending of a play. High fidelity is an unbiased, neutral, exact copy (or "reproduction") of the original source's tonal balance, timing, dynamics, etc..

m. zillch is online now  
post #15 of 31 Old 03-29-2007, 01:10 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Now I was skeptical about MP3 players having 16mW per channel and I don't know what the hell
it does to my headphones, but my headphones has 3,000mW. Am I missing something?

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #16 of 31 Old 03-29-2007, 05:41 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 110
Don't bother learning what "watts" or the 1/1000th sized unit called "milliwatt" really means. Why? Because once you come to fully understand it, you'll then come to realize that not a single manufacturer states all the specific test conditions necessary to make the number meaningful. If I remember correctly, you need to know 6 test conditions to make the "watts" number meaningful. Say a manufacturer claims their amp (could be home, pro, car, MP3 player, doesn't matter) has "100 watts" (or milliwatts, again it doesn't matter).

A) Do they mean its peak capability for a momentary transient like a hand clap in the music or its continuous output over a sustained period of time (without overheating and shutting down), often labeled "RMS" ?

B) Is this 100 watts per channel or all the channels (2 for stereo, 5/7 for surround sound) summed together?

C) If per channel, were the other non-tested channels also pumping out 100 watts simultaneously or were they at idle so the power supply could devote all its energy to the only driven channel?

D) Into what impedance load (with either speakers or headphones)? 100 watts into an 8 ohm speaker is easy, 100 watts into a 2 ohm speaker is much more difficult.

E) At what test frequency? Outputting a 1KHz sine wave (sounding like a "beep") is much easier than a deep bass note at, say, 20 Hz which sounds more like an earthquake is shaking the house.

F) With how much permissible distortion, usually stated as a percentage in THD (total harmonic distortion)? Car amps were notorious for cheating on this one. 100 watts with 13% THD is junk compared to a clean 95 watt amp at .1% THD, yet guess which amps sell more: "100 watt" or "95 watt"? You get the picture?

So unless all six of these test conditions are clearly stated, "watts" are meaningless. Even if you were to discover that a particular amp had 100 watts per channel, RMS, all channels driven, from 20Hz-20KHz, into an 8 ohm load, with less than .01 % THD, you still don't know where exactly that level occurs on its volume dial [no it's not at "11" ]. It's usually in the middle "4-6" area so if you encounter an unusually low volume recording, or a very quiet passage, you have some room left to turn up the gain to hear it.

As for you not going deaf from listening too loudly, it's impossible to describe over the internet what's a safe level. The time of the exposure is also critical. OSHA gives safety guidelines which may at least help:
Noise exposure limits for daily activity
But how can we know what level we're getting from headphone use of a given device? That's almost impossible to answer without placing a small probe microphone in your ear canal while you're listening to headphones and see how loud you tend to turn it up. Even cheap MP3 devices are easily capable of deafening levels with efficient headphones. As I said in my previous post, if you have any after effects like muffled perception, ringing, having to say "what?" when talking to others, it's too loud.

P.S. I don't think you need to buy an amp at all. I don't have one. The other guy, StarHalo, wasn't suggesting you get one for more volume, he was suggesting it for sound quality. I can see where they'd be useful for some devices with "bypassable" volume controls or direct digital outs, but none of my portable gear has either so I don't think I'd benefit from one.

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there is no concept of "accounting for taste". We don't "pick" the level of bass any more than we get to pick the ending of a play. High fidelity is an unbiased, neutral, exact copy (or "reproduction") of the original source's tonal balance, timing, dynamics, etc..

m. zillch is online now  
post #17 of 31 Old 03-29-2007, 09:07 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks for that you probably straightened it out. I knew what those mean but not truly sure.
I am a DJ so quality comes first when it comes to songs. I don't have anything below 128Kbps
songs because 128Kbps is the lowest for me when it comes to old songs like MC Hammer and
such. I work with 1441Kbps all the way to 192Kbps mostly and rarely 128Kbps. I have a keen
sense of hearing so if something like that comes in my way (mW) it confuses me because the
specification on another device is conflicting with my knowledge.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #18 of 31 Old 03-29-2007, 10:21 PM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Allow me to second and further what M. Zillch said - not only does the power handling spec on headphone packaging mean nothing, but *pretty much all the info on headphone packaging means nothing*. The frequency response doesn't mention anything about rolloff, the driver size is no indication of performance, etc. The only spec worth noting is impedance, and that's only to get a vague idea of how well a low-powered portable will work with that set of headphones. (a high impedance number, like 300 or beyond, means an iPod won't be nearly as loud at the same volume level compared to a low-impedance headphone, and will drain its battery faster)

As for a safe volume level - go to a local shopping mall on a busy day and note the ambient volume level, then go home and match it through your headphones; that's the safe volume level.
StarHalo is offline  
post #19 of 31 Old 03-30-2007, 09:36 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 110
You're right. Pretty much all the specs are bogus. Even when they do give the impedance they don't state if it's the impedance at 1 KHz, the "nominal" impedance (kind of like saying the average level of a curve with lots of peaks and dips above and below that level), or the minimum impedance across the entire 20-20KHz range.

The comparison to the SPL (sound pressure level) in a shopping mall is problematic because I suppose they must vary quite a bit and also because acoustical memory is fleeting. By the time you get home your memory of how loud it was could be off by a large amount. Sound comparisons should ideally be nearly instantaneous like in an A/B test were you can switch between the two with no delay.

Here's a test like.no.other could do, although it does cost a few bucks. First, buy one of these cheap, yet fairly accurate SPL meters (Scosche SPL1000):

Only $15 at Walmart, if they still have them:
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=4694329 ,
$20-$30 elsewhere, or a Radio Shack version for $40-$60. Take it home and get your stereo system cued up and ready to play the exact same track as your MP3 player will in a just a moment. Disconnect one speaker from your stereo system and go sit in a chair right next to the remaining hooked up speaker with one ear facing the speaker at a distance of say one foot or so. [This is our trick of mimicking a megawatt, blaring loud stereo system without you having to get a hold of one or angering neighbors]. Now listening to the song at the lowest level you feel you could live with for mixing purposes, etc, through the mp3 player alone using headphones. Note the number or bar graph position of its volume control and leave it fixed there for the rest of the test. Now, remove the same channel earphone as the speaker you disconnected by flipping it around backwards like DJ's often do to monitor the room sound with one ear. You are now hearing your MP3 player at the volume you like but through only one ear. Now, as quickly as possible (by remote control would be best) play the one speaker of the stereo system instead and listen to the volume of it (without any headphones on of course, through the same ear that was just listening to the headphone). Go back and forth between the two and adjust your stereo speaker's volume only, until it's exactly equal to the MP3/headphone's perceived level. Got it? Now replace your loudspeaker listening ear's location with the new SPL meter you just got and measure the SPL. You now know what volume level you like to listen to and can follow OSHA guidelines from my post earlier as to time limits.

Note, to be a fair test you have to do it monophonically as I've illustrated because unlike headphones, stereo speakers' output are not isolated to one ear only. Each ear also hears some of the other channel of sound and this would skew our results. Also synchronizing the songs from the stereo system and the MP3 player would be even better, but not 100% necessary.

As for what to do with the new SPL toy with the cool, blue-lighted display? Perhaps take it to gigs and see if it acts as a "chick magnet", placed on top of your gear.

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there is no concept of "accounting for taste". We don't "pick" the level of bass any more than we get to pick the ending of a play. High fidelity is an unbiased, neutral, exact copy (or "reproduction") of the original source's tonal balance, timing, dynamics, etc..

m. zillch is online now  
post #20 of 31 Old 04-01-2007, 04:07 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Since I already have the headphones I think it's time for review.

Built/Comfort:
Just to start off, this headphones is a head turner and a chick magnet. It's very attractive.
This headphones is heavy due to driver and the metallic or aluminum casing the driver is in.
If you have read other reviews regarding cracks around the joints, I haven't encounter it yet
but I really think it feels sturdy enough to be dropped 10ft and still no damage. The cups on
soft so as the speaker grilles. The only down size to this is this is built to cancel surrounding
noise around you so it's pressing hard on your ears to cup it tight. It gets a little tight for use
more than 5 hours but resting for 5 minutes will take you another 5 hours.

Sound Quality:
This is mainly pointed towards heavy bass music so you'll get more bass out of any other
headphones out there, then this is it. To show you an example how deep and loud the bass
goes on this, I tested it with a can and fill it with some BB and turn it max using X-Fi sound
card (110 SNR) playing continous bass lines I built @ 1,441Kbps 107dB. The BBs literally bounced
all over the cans like you were shaking it with your hands. Anyways I tested this with other
genres and all I can say is it can achieve crystalline highs and clear voice without using equalizer.
But the mids are a little boomy but not that boomy. I used my X-Fi sound card testing this
at a range of 1,441Kbps to 320Kbps @ 107dB the highest achieved dB this headphones can
reach. There is no distortion whatsoever.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #21 of 31 Old 04-10-2007, 08:31 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Raymond Leggs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I Was looking at a pair of subwoofer headphones but what I just read changed my minds (too much bass)

One shall stand... One Shall Fall... - Optimus Prime
Raymond Leggs is offline  
post #22 of 31 Old 04-10-2007, 09:03 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond Leggs View Post

I Was looking at a pair of subwoofer headphones but what I just read changed my minds (too much bass)

Go with MDR-V6. It's the most accurate headphones you can get for the price. It has bass but not as ridiculously as MDR-V700DJ has. You can look up reviews for MDR-V6. I highly recommend MDR-V6 than MDR-V700DJ. Do not get confused with MDR-V600. MDR-V600 is inferior to MDR-V6. Also, MDR-7506 is the same thing as MDR-V6 only minor cosmetic changes.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
post #23 of 31 Old 04-11-2007, 12:30 AM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
The MDR-7506's are also available at your local franchise musical instrument store (no shipping charge!), as these are the studio monitor cans that most musicians and studios use. (and myself, and I'm a musician)

If you're actually interested in them, below is a review I wrote about the 7506's for a sales site:

Sony MDR-7506

The Standard

If you've read down far enough to find this review, you probably already know that these are the professional studio monitor headphones used by pretty much anyone with a mixing board - from Celine Dion to Slipknot, from NFL broadcasts to The Howard Stern Show, these are the way most recording artists and studios hear every note and nuance. If you're not already convinced, read on.

Most new 7506 owners are awed by their headphones before even hearing them, at least by the packaging. The headphones themselves rest on gently tousled silver silk behind a clear plastic window emblazoned with a large gold "7506". The presentation alone gives the potential buyer the feel of buying a giant engagement ring, but the theatrics end once you open the box. Getting down to business inside is a very serious schematic diagram documenting the complete parts and assembly list of the fifty or so pieces that go into making this single pair of headphones, a 1/8" to 1/4" adapter (the screw-on type, a must for live use), and a pleather carrying pouch.

The 7506s are visually almost an anti-climax to the packaging. The design is very basic and straightforward without any tricks or frills, but simplicity is part of the appeal here. Every detail has been engineered to work simply and simply work. The steel band size adjustment snicks into place confidently at each numbered groove. Both earcups rotate vertically a full 180 degrees on their hinges with ease. The 1/8" plug has an all-metal casing with a real rubber sleeve, as you'd find on actual pro audio music cables. The more deeply you look into each element of the design, the more you'll appreciate how much Sony also looked into it.

Putting on the 7506s is also an easy affair, thanks to their eight ounce weight and modest profile. They're actually small enough that you could get away with wearing them in public, but you wouldn't hear much else - the closed design combined with cushy stuffed vinyl pads and secure, if not tailored, fit means the ambient sound isolation borders on noise-cancelling. The earcups can also be folded upwards against the inside of the headband for portability - so portable in fact, that you could place a folded set of 7506s in a child's lunchbox *with room to spare*.

But if ever a good thing came in a small package, it's the big sound of these headphones. Ruler flat response, deep sound stage, and sniper tight accuracy means every aspect of the source signal comes to life and is revealed in full. Bass notes come through with such authority that you find yourself occasionally making note of your feet, to see if you can feel the bass in the floor. Instrument placement is at once obvious - parsing out where each instrument and sound is in a mix is instantly clear. Previously hidden and obscure sounds and passages in various tracks stand out so well that entire songs are made new again. There just isn't any sound that the 7506s can't reproduce exactly as you'd hear it with your own ears.

Those of you who like to tailor your sound with extra helpings of bass or volume have also been accommodated - On the low end, using even the most basic bass boost the 7506s can faithfully reproduce subwoofers-in-the-trunk neighborhood-wide bass *in your head*. I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't heard it myself. Volume-wise, a low impedance matched with a high power handing capacity means these headphones are easily driven by an iPod or Walkman, yet can easily achieve volume levels that could liquefy your inner ear without even the implication of distorting. Plainly speaking, whatever you want the 7506s to do, they'll do it with ease.

Keep in mind that revealing everything requires a good source. Plugging these into a cheaper portable or poorly EQ'd equipment will quickly make any and all limitations evident. This includes cheap computer audio hardware and low frequency/bandwidth MP3s. Uncompressed file formats suddenly seem a lot more practical when you can hear the constraints of highly compressed MP3s.

"Audiophile" sites and reviews have had a hard time coming to grips with these headphones. Being that they're a consumer brand product available at any common music store at a fraction of the price of most other high-end models, the "elite" image and price tag that goes along with it just aren't a part of the 7506's game. It's reflected in some reviews, some saying they're "too bassy", others "too bright", but how exactly is this possible if you're using a decent source and the same headphones the musicians/engineers used to create the recording? You're hearing the music exactly as it was heard in the studio, exactly as it was meant to be heard. Only the 7506s can make that promise.

If you're creating any kind of recordings and find yourself crossing your fingers that you're hearing it as it's actually being recorded, or just a music lover who feels it's time to hear the music as it was meant to be heard, you're only a hundred dollars away from the Sony MDR-7506. Five stars and my highest recommendation to Sony's masterpiece.
StarHalo is offline  
post #24 of 31 Old 04-11-2007, 09:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Raymond Leggs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
My dog eats headphones!

One shall stand... One Shall Fall... - Optimus Prime
Raymond Leggs is offline  
post #25 of 31 Old 04-12-2007, 04:54 AM
Member
 
StarHalo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
If I had headphones like yours, I'd feed 'em to my dog too
StarHalo is offline  
post #26 of 31 Old 04-12-2007, 09:27 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Raymond Leggs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Not ALL of my headphones are bad

i just find a dog eating headphones to be too shocking! (I wonder what will happen whenI buy those Koss Cup headphones! I can only imagingthe horror of a brand new pair of headphones being chewed on by a mentaly challanged dog!

One shall stand... One Shall Fall... - Optimus Prime
Raymond Leggs is offline  
post #27 of 31 Old 04-12-2007, 09:29 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Raymond Leggs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I'm not a pro musicial so ther is no mixing board! in fact there is no band yet!

One shall stand... One Shall Fall... - Optimus Prime
Raymond Leggs is offline  
post #28 of 31 Old 01-08-2008, 02:09 PM
Member
 
dj_james's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
imho, the mdr-v700 headphones suck bawls for durabilty. i have broken two pairs myself, and have seen a few more broken on other DJs during gigs.
dj_james is offline  
post #29 of 31 Old 01-08-2008, 07:45 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 110
There are headphones that don't break? I've never owned any.

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there is no concept of "accounting for taste". We don't "pick" the level of bass any more than we get to pick the ending of a play. High fidelity is an unbiased, neutral, exact copy (or "reproduction") of the original source's tonal balance, timing, dynamics, etc..

m. zillch is online now  
post #30 of 31 Old 01-11-2008, 10:34 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
like.no.other.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Most of DJ headphones break when under heavy use from all that twisting and sweat.
Pioneer HDJ-1000 is the same with Sony MDR-V700DJ. They break if you use it too hard.
For a $150 headphones, you better take care of it.

There is always someone out there that gives you opinion of a product that they don't even own.
like.no.other. is offline  
Reply Portable A/V

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off