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post #91 of 1599 Old 04-16-2010, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topr View Post

What ever happened to the 1.5-2 times your screen size as the standard for viewing distance.

For standard TV...
"optimum TV viewing distance that varies between 2.2 to 1.54 times the screen width."

Discussion on 3D tv viewing distance:

http://www.practical-home-theater-gu...-distance.html
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post #92 of 1599 Old 04-16-2010, 01:57 PM
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Going by the standard in the provided link, if the resolution gets any better than it is now I'll have set my knees under the bottom of the dip[lay to get the full benefit.
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post #93 of 1599 Old 04-16-2010, 04:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topr View Post

What ever happened to the 1.5-2 times your screen size as the standard for viewing distance.

that's based on field of view/regard, not visual acuity. two separate topics.

"A wide screen just makes a bad film twice as bad. "
-Samuel Goldwyn

I wonder what he'd think about 3D IMAX?
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post #94 of 1599 Old 04-16-2010, 06:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topr View Post

Going by the standard in the provided link, if the resolution gets any better than it is now I'll have set my knees under the bottom of the display to get the full benefit.

Not really if you go for a projector with a 120 inch screen or perhaps the forthcoming Vizio 72 inch LCD.

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post #95 of 1599 Old 04-17-2010, 02:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex8246 View Post

Here are some pics:
Watched Planet Earth last night on Blu-ray with all the lights off and it looked incredible. Unfortunately I did notice some zone-banding, especially when the screen was mostly or all one color, for example shots of the blue sky or when the screen turns all white, in "vivid" picture mode. I will try to watch it in "game" mode and see what happens. I plan on ordering different HDMI cables to try to fix this ps3 HDMI issue with the picture and audio cutting out for half a second.

Keep in mind that it's well documented by pro reviewers that Planet Earth is filled with unavoidable Banding incidents throughout that are observable on any TV caused by the processing of the film. It was well documented by pro reviewers of Planet Earth HD/BD when it debuted - VC-1 encoding - despite this it's one of the highest rated HD/BD series.

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post #96 of 1599 Old 04-17-2010, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westa6969 View Post

Keep in mind that it's well documented by pro reviewers that Planet Earth is filled with unavoidable Banding incidents throughout that are observable on any TV caused by the processing of the film. It was well documented by pro reviewers of Planet Earth HD/BD when it debuted - VC-1 encoding - despite this it's one of the highest rated HD/BD series.

Quite so. And, according to reports I have seen, there are scenes lifted from previous excursions that were originally filmed in SD.

Nevertheless a real treat. I have the HD DVD version

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post #97 of 1599 Old 04-18-2010, 09:53 PM
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Once the Life Blu-ray comes out - the other one, the one without Oprah Winfrey - it would be great to compare the New LE series with the old LH series, with winner take all! But then again - it might look better on a 72"!

A 55LX9500 on the Horizon? Soon?
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post #98 of 1599 Old 04-20-2010, 05:24 AM
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The backlight banding issue is caused by turning off LED Local Dimming

Why would you want to turn off Local Dimming? It does not act like Dynamic Contrast where color measurements will go off.

KakiC●l○r® Calibration w/ Calman

---------------------------------------------------------------

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post #99 of 1599 Old 04-22-2010, 02:20 PM
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Even though we have had these for a while we finally got ours to test. Chads review will be up in a few days. Over all he said it was an excellent set

--47LE8500 are now in also.....
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post #100 of 1599 Old 04-24-2010, 11:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KakimotoRift View Post

The backlight banding issue is caused by turning off LED Local Dimming

Why would you want to turn off Local Dimming? It does not act like Dynamic Contrast where color measurements will go off.

No it's backwards. It is caused by turning it on. Unfortunately.
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post #101 of 1599 Old 04-25-2010, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Cleveland Plasma View Post

Even though we have had these for a while we finally got ours to test. Chads review will be up in a few days. Over all he said it was an excellent set

--47LE8500 are now in also.....

Where can I find this review?
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post #102 of 1599 Old 04-27-2010, 08:54 AM
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so has anyone tried calibrating their set yet? anyone try the cnet settings? mine's coming on thursday and am anxious for some info.
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post #103 of 1599 Old 04-27-2010, 09:40 PM
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Recently, Chris invited me out to Cleveland Plasma to check out the sleek, new LG 55LE8500 LED LCD TV. As the replacement for the mighty LH90 series, I hoped that LG would be able to maintain or refine the core picture quality while giving the cosmetics a welcome facelift.

The LE8500 is indeed one of the thinnest and beautiful designs out there. However, it is surprisingly heavy, which gives it a sense of very high build quality. The front is covered with a glossy sheet of glass, which, while it seems to offer a high level of durability and protection, unfortunately picks up much more distinct reflections than the LH90's matte screen.

LG's latest models have included some of the most thorough calibration adjustments available, and the LE8500 continues that tradition. In addition to the normal picture adjustments, highlights include a switchable 10 point gamma/grayscale adjustment, a partial CMS adjustment that gives level and hue controls for each primary and secondary color, and new customizable TruMotion controls. There are two ISF Expert modes, which can be locked and renamed ISF Day or ISF Night; and two THX modes, called THX Cinema and THX Bright Room.

I began by measuring the LE8500's performance in the THX and ISF modes before making any adjustments. Other modes may be more watchable in some situations, though for the most part these modes give the most accurate picture. They all had an emphasis of green in the grayscale, which can impart a slightly dingy, drab look to the picture. THX Bright room was tuned pretty well for dealing with a lot of ambient light. ISF Expert would be a pretty good choice for an all purpose mode if you do not prefer to switch back and forth between day and night modes.

The LE8500 holds it's color very well off axis, so viewing angle is not as critical as it tends to be on the Sonys and Samsungs I've worked with. With those others, you loose color and contrast if you move to the sides of the couch; with the LE8500 at least the color is maintained. In addition, the LE8500 has the capability of putting out an extremely bright picture with little to no compromise in accuracy. These two characteristics mean the LE8500 will adapt well to a typical living room.

The first performance difference that I observed between the LE8500 and the LH90 was the slight horizontal lines in the LE8500's image, which showed up mostly in bright, large, solid objects. The lines appeared to be divisions between the LED backlight zones, and they were more apparent while an image was being drawn than after the image fully appeared. Most likely a result of an attempt to reduce the faint glowing or haze around objects caused by the limited number of backlight zones, they seemed to do that and more.

I also noticed the LE8500's backlight zones behave differently than the LH90's. The LE8500's firmware is apparently tuned to fully light up each zone when that zone is displaying a bright object no matter what the size; in other words, a solitary bright star in the black night would cause that zone to fully light up. Because of the increased definition between zones caused by the bands, the exact size and shape of the zone manifested itself more plainly. The LH90, on the other hand, tends not to fully illuminate each zone if only a small dot or line is displayed in the zone. It seems to be programmed to need a larger portion of the zone to be occupied with picture content before the zone is fully illuminated. That, combined with the L90's lack of sharp definition between zones, gives the two TVs a very different characteristic in dark and high contrast scenes. These artifacts are the downside to local dimming technology and are the price paid for dark, inky blacks with rich contrast on an LCD. They are only noticeable in a dark room, and overall I feel they are a small price to pay for the great blacks and contrast.

The LE8500 calibrates well, with very accurate color, gamma, and grayscale after calibration (attachment 4). An Eye One Pro or ColorMunki spectro are the least expensive tools that should be used to do a full calibration. The screen can be totally black in areas that are not displaying a picture. The 10 step adjustment and CMS controls work well. Oddly, though, I was able to measure the effects of the CMS control, even though the visible effects on real program material were virtually unnoticeable. That is not the case with the LH90, where relatively small CMS adjustments can have a big impact on perceived fleshtones and colors. I noticed the TruMotion controls, which give separate judder and blur reduction in up to 10 steps, seemed a little quirky. The judder reduction appeared to be all or nothing with my 1080P/24 test material; any setting from 1 through 10 brought on the too-smooth video look, while 0 looked jerky in comparison. I couldn't see any effect with the blur reduction, though I was looking at movie clips rather than fast moving sports. Though this may sound like a disaster, in reality it's more control than the LH90 provided; and I was perfectly satisfied with movement and pans with judder set at 1 and blur near mid point.

Granted, I've pointed out the nit picky problems I often uncover with a TV. I have yet to find a TV that didn't have one or two. What really matters to a videophile is not the little issues, but the big picture. And the big picture is what floored me about the LE8500. What I saw is probably the most three dimensional 2D image I have ever seen! Familiar scenes gave a wonderful impression of depth and dimensionality. Bright images popped out, and there was an excellent sense of contrast. Shadow detail was superb, with dark images neither sinking into black or looking washed out. Skintones were superb, with a realistic but not overdone ruddiness to faces; on the LH90 they looked just a tiny bit yellowish in comparison, though the LH90 is also excellent in this regard. I did notice, however, that there was a little more graininess in the LE8500's image than I usually see. It was soon apparent, after viewing my familiar The Dark Knight and DVE clips, that the LE8500 even beat the giant-killer LH90 in overall depth, pop, and color. While some may believe these differences are due to the glossy screen, I have compared the matte screen LH90 to the glossy Samsung B8500 without the same impressions. I have to admit I still do not like glossy screens, and I am sad to see glare resistant screen of the LH90 go. My gut feeling is that a good bit of the differences I saw were from the different tuning of the LED backlight action.

I came away with an extremely positive impression of the LE8500. While there's always a wish list of improvements, that list seems to sink into the shadows left behind by the superb image. Keep 'em coming, LG!


Note: the calibration reports erroneously list the display as a 47LH90, because I did not close out the calibration session after calibrating the LH90. I calibrated the LE8500 right after the LH90, and the reports are from the 55LE8500.

 

LG LE8500 before ISF expert.pdf 172.251953125k . file

 

LG LE8500 before THX Bright room.pdf 176.9501953125k . file

 

LG LE8500 before THX Cinema.pdf 175.1083984375k . file

 

LG LE8500 after ISF night.pdf 169.619140625k . file

ISF/THX calibrator with Jeti 1211 reference spectro
Latest reviews:LG 65UB9800Samsung UN65HU8550UN65HU9000, UN85HU8550, LG 55EC9300, LG 55EA8800 (including 3D)

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post #104 of 1599 Old 04-27-2010, 09:57 PM
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Chad, did you think the LE8500 bested the 9G Kuro elite in pop or contrast?

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post #105 of 1599 Old 04-27-2010, 10:39 PM
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It was an amazing time as we had the LG 55LE8500 to review and calibrate, by chance we had a LG 42LH90 being calibrated for a paid client Chad was able "to play"
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post #106 of 1599 Old 04-27-2010, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post

Recently, Chris invited me out to Cleveland Plasma to check out the sleek, new LG 55LE8500 LED LCD TV. As the replacement for the mighty LH90 series, I hoped that LG would be able to maintain or refine the core picture quality while giving the cosmetics a welcome facelift.

The LE8500 is indeed one of the thinnest and beautiful designs out there. However, it is surprisingly heavy, which gives it a sense of very high build quality. The front is covered with a glossy sheet of glass, which, while it seems to offer a high level of durability and protection, unfortunately picks up much more distinct reflections than the LH90's matte screen.

LG's latest models have included some of the most thorough calibration adjustments available, and the LE8500 continues that tradition. In addition to the normal picture adjustments, highlights include a switchable 10 point gamma/grayscale adjustment, a partial CMS adjustment that gives level and hue controls for each primary and secondary color, and new customizable TruMotion controls. There are two ISF Expert modes, which can be locked and renamed ISF Day or ISF Night; and two THX modes, called THX Cinema and THX Bright Room.

I began by measuring the LE8500's performance in the THX and ISF modes before making any adjustments. Other modes may be more watchable in some situations, though for the most part these modes give the most accurate picture. They all had an emphasis of green in the grayscale, which can impart a slightly dingy, drab look to the picture. THX Bright room was tuned pretty well for dealing with a lot of ambient light. ISF Expert would be a pretty good choice for an all purpose mode if you do not prefer to switch back and forth between day and night modes.

The LE8500 holds it's color very well off axis, so viewing angle is not as critical as it tends to be on the Sonys and Samsungs I've worked with. With those others, you loose color and contrast if you move to the sides of the couch; with the LE8500 at least the color is maintained. In addition, the LE8500 has the capability of putting out an extremely bright picture with little to no compromise in accuracy. These two characteristics mean the LE8500 will adapt well to a typical living room.

The first performance difference that I observed between the LE8500 and the LH90 was the slight horizontal lines in the LE8500's image, which showed up mostly in bright, large, solid objects. The lines appeared to be divisions between the LED backlight zones, and they were more apparent while an image was being drawn than after the image fully appeared. Most likely a result of an attempt to reduce the faint glowing or haze around objects caused by the limited number of backlight zones, they seemed to do that and more.

I also noticed the LE8500's backlight zones behave differently than the LH90's. The LE8500's firmware is apparently tuned to fully light up each zone when that zone is displaying a bright object no matter what the size; in other words, a solitary bright star in the black night would cause that zone to fully light up. Because of the increased definition between zones caused by the bands, the exact size and shape of the zone manifested itself more plainly. The LH90, on the other hand, tends not to fully illuminate each zone if only a small dot or line is displayed in the zone. It seems to be programmed to need a larger portion of the zone to be occupied with picture content before the zone is fully illuminated. That, combined with the L90's lack of sharp definition between zones, gives the two TVs a very different characteristic in dark and high contrast scenes. These artifacts are the downside to local dimming technology and are the price paid for dark, inky blacks with rich contrast on an LCD. They are only noticeable in a dark room, and overall I feel they are a small price to pay for the great blacks and contrast.

The LE8500 calibrates well, with very accurate color, gamma, and grayscale after calibration (attachment 4). An Eye One Pro or ColorMunki spectro are the least expensive tools that should be used to do a full calibration. The screen can be totally black in areas that are not displaying a picture. The 10 step adjustment and CMS controls work well. Oddly, though, I was able to measure the effects of the CMS control, even though the visible effects on real program material were virtually unnoticeable. That is not the case with the LH90, where relatively small CMS adjustments can have a big impact on perceived fleshtones and colors. I noticed the TruMotion controls, which give separate judder and blur reduction in up to 10 steps, seemed a little quirky. The judder reduction appeared to be all or nothing with my 1080P/24 test material; any setting from 1 through 10 brought on the too-smooth video look, while 0 looked jerky in comparison. I couldn't see any effect with the blur reduction, though I was looking at movie clips rather than fast moving sports. Though this may sound like a disaster, in reality it's more control than the LH90 provided; and I was perfectly satisfied with movement and pans with judder set at 1 and blur near mid point.

Granted, I've pointed out the nit picky problems I often uncover with a TV. I have yet to find a TV that didn't have one or two. What really matters to a videophile is not the little issues, but the big picture. And the big picture is what floored me about the LE8500. What I saw is probably the most three dimensional 2D image I have ever seen! Familiar scenes gave a wonderful impression of depth and dimensionality. Bright images popped out, and there was an excellent sense of contrast. Shadow detail was superb, with dark images neither sinking into black or looking washed out. Skintones were superb, with a realistic but not overdone ruddiness to faces; on the LH90 they looked just a tiny bit yellowish in comparison, though the LH90 is also excellent in this regard. I did notice, however, that there was a little more graininess in the LE8500's image than I usually see. It was soon apparent, after viewing my familiar The Dark Knight and DVE clips, that the LE8500 even beat the giant-killer LH90 in overall depth, pop, and color. While some may believe these differences are due to the glossy screen, I have compared the matte screen LH90 to the glossy Samsung B8500 without the same impressions. I have to admit I still do not like glossy screens, and I am sad to see glare resistant screen of the LH90 go. My gut feeling is that a good bit of the differences I saw were from the different tuning of the LED backlight action.

I came away with an extremely positive impression of the LE8500. While there's always a wish list of improvements, that list seems to sink into the shadows left behind by the superb image. Keep 'em coming, LG!


Note: the calibration reports erroneously list the display as a 47LH90, because I did not close out the calibration session after calibrating the LH90. I calibrated the LE8500 right after the LH90, and the reports are from the 55LE8500.

So, would you say this LE8500 beats the Sammy? What's a tv that's close to this tv PQ wise?
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post #107 of 1599 Old 04-27-2010, 11:58 PM
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In terms of pure picture quality, speaking as a person who spent a couple weeks with the LG LE8500, (documenting and photographing my experience in the LG thread here at the forum), and also recently having a Samsung B8500 on hand... in my opinion the LE8500 definitely matches the Sammy B8500, and even surpasses in some ways. Same goes for the 2008 Sony XBR8 and Sammy A950 models. I think the LG can match or surpass any of them.

Unfortunately, the zone banding I discovered in the LG LE8500 was not acceptable to me. It might not seem like a big deal if you only watch the TV for a few hours, or a few days, but after a couple weeks of seeing it, all over the place, in every type of source and situation, there is no way I could accept it, or recommend anybody spend $3,000 on it. Some people may not be bothered by it, but frankly, if you are a videophile with a discriminating eye, I believe you will be bothered by it too. At least if you have the 55-inch model and are sitting only 8 feet away like I was. For this reason, the LG was not able to dethrone the Sammy B8500 or Sony XBR8 in my book as 'overall' champ.

Anyway, I'm not here to rain on LG's parade. I documented the issue in depth earlier in the LG threads. A couple people have returned sets because of it, but another owner (sitting at a greater distance) said he's not bothered by it. So, each person will have to experience it for themselves.

LG still has the 9500 model coming, so there might be hope the issue is reduced or eliminated with the increased number of leds/zones it's rumored to have, but if that rumor is not true, the 9500 will have the same flaw, and will basically be a 3D version of the 8500.

One day at a time...
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post #108 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 12:09 AM
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Btw, thanks for another informative review Chad (and Chris). Always look forward to them. Good stuff!

One day at a time...
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post #109 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 06:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post

Recently, Chris invited me out to Cleveland Plasma to check out the sleek, new LG 55LE8500 LED LCD TV. As the replacement for the mighty LH90 series, I hoped that LG would be able to maintain or refine the core picture quality while giving the cosmetics a welcome facelift.

The LE8500 is indeed one of the thinnest and beautiful designs out there. However, it is surprisingly heavy, which gives it a sense of very high build quality. The front is covered with a glossy sheet of glass, which, while it seems to offer a high level of durability and protection, unfortunately picks up much more distinct reflections than the LH90's matte screen.

LG's latest models have included some of the most thorough calibration adjustments available, and the LE8500 continues that tradition. In addition to the normal picture adjustments, highlights include a switchable 10 point gamma/grayscale adjustment, a partial CMS adjustment that gives level and hue controls for each primary and secondary color, and new customizable TruMotion controls. There are two ISF Expert modes, which can be locked and renamed ISF Day or ISF Night; and two THX modes, called THX Cinema and THX Bright Room.

I began by measuring the LE8500's performance in the THX and ISF modes before making any adjustments. Other modes may be more watchable in some situations, though for the most part these modes give the most accurate picture. They all had an emphasis of green in the grayscale, which can impart a slightly dingy, drab look to the picture. THX Bright room was tuned pretty well for dealing with a lot of ambient light. ISF Expert would be a pretty good choice for an all purpose mode if you do not prefer to switch back and forth between day and night modes.

The LE8500 holds it's color very well off axis, so viewing angle is not as critical as it tends to be on the Sonys and Samsungs I've worked with. With those others, you loose color and contrast if you move to the sides of the couch; with the LE8500 at least the color is maintained. In addition, the LE8500 has the capability of putting out an extremely bright picture with little to no compromise in accuracy. These two characteristics mean the LE8500 will adapt well to a typical living room.

The first performance difference that I observed between the LE8500 and the LH90 was the slight horizontal lines in the LE8500's image, which showed up mostly in bright, large, solid objects. The lines appeared to be divisions between the LED backlight zones, and they were more apparent while an image was being drawn than after the image fully appeared. Most likely a result of an attempt to reduce the faint glowing or haze around objects caused by the limited number of backlight zones, they seemed to do that and more.

I also noticed the LE8500's backlight zones behave differently than the LH90's. The LE8500's firmware is apparently tuned to fully light up each zone when that zone is displaying a bright object no matter what the size; in other words, a solitary bright star in the black night would cause that zone to fully light up. Because of the increased definition between zones caused by the bands, the exact size and shape of the zone manifested itself more plainly. The LH90, on the other hand, tends not to fully illuminate each zone if only a small dot or line is displayed in the zone. It seems to be programmed to need a larger portion of the zone to be occupied with picture content before the zone is fully illuminated. That, combined with the L90's lack of sharp definition between zones, gives the two TVs a very different characteristic in dark and high contrast scenes. These artifacts are the downside to local dimming technology and are the price paid for dark, inky blacks with rich contrast on an LCD. They are only noticeable in a dark room, and overall I feel they are a small price to pay for the great blacks and contrast.

The LE8500 calibrates well, with very accurate color, gamma, and grayscale after calibration (attachment 4). An Eye One Pro or ColorMunki spectro are the least expensive tools that should be used to do a full calibration. The screen can be totally black in areas that are not displaying a picture. The 10 step adjustment and CMS controls work well. Oddly, though, I was able to measure the effects of the CMS control, even though the visible effects on real program material were virtually unnoticeable. That is not the case with the LH90, where relatively small CMS adjustments can have a big impact on perceived fleshtones and colors. I noticed the TruMotion controls, which give separate judder and blur reduction in up to 10 steps, seemed a little quirky. The judder reduction appeared to be all or nothing with my 1080P/24 test material; any setting from 1 through 10 brought on the too-smooth video look, while 0 looked jerky in comparison. I couldn't see any effect with the blur reduction, though I was looking at movie clips rather than fast moving sports. Though this may sound like a disaster, in reality it's more control than the LH90 provided; and I was perfectly satisfied with movement and pans with judder set at 1 and blur near mid point.

Granted, I've pointed out the nit picky problems I often uncover with a TV. I have yet to find a TV that didn't have one or two. What really matters to a videophile is not the little issues, but the big picture. And the big picture is what floored me about the LE8500. What I saw is probably the most three dimensional 2D image I have ever seen! Familiar scenes gave a wonderful impression of depth and dimensionality. Bright images popped out, and there was an excellent sense of contrast. Shadow detail was superb, with dark images neither sinking into black or looking washed out. Skintones were superb, with a realistic but not overdone ruddiness to faces; on the LH90 they looked just a tiny bit yellowish in comparison, though the LH90 is also excellent in this regard. I did notice, however, that there was a little more graininess in the LE8500's image than I usually see. It was soon apparent, after viewing my familiar The Dark Knight and DVE clips, that the LE8500 even beat the giant-killer LH90 in overall depth, pop, and color. While some may believe these differences are due to the glossy screen, I have compared the matte screen LH90 to the glossy Samsung B8500 without the same impressions. I have to admit I still do not like glossy screens, and I am sad to see glare resistant screen of the LH90 go. My gut feeling is that a good bit of the differences I saw were from the different tuning of the LED backlight action.

I came away with an extremely positive impression of the LE8500. While there's always a wish list of improvements, that list seems to sink into the shadows left behind by the superb image. Keep 'em coming, LG!


Note: the calibration reports erroneously list the display as a 47LH90, because I did not close out the calibration session after calibrating the LH90. I calibrated the LE8500 right after the LH90, and the reports are from the 55LE8500.

Great review as always, thanks Chad.
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post #110 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 06:53 AM
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So, would you say this LE8500 beats the Sammy? What's a tv that's close to this tv PQ wise?

In my opinion, yes.
The 9G Elite Kuro and Sammy B8500 are probably closest in PQ.
Though as Happy Nightmares pointed out, the line issue is something that I would have to live with for an extended period of time before I knew just how much it would bother me. On static images the lines were faint enough not to bother me, but a couple of times when the image changed and the TV was drawing the image they caught my eye.

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post #111 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 06:58 AM
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In my opinion, yes.
The 9G Elite Kuro and Sammy B8500 are probably closest in PQ.
Though as Happy Nightmares pointed out, the line issue is something that I would have to live with for an extended period of time before I knew just how much it would bother me. On static images the lines were faint enough not to bother me, but a couple of times when the image changed and the TV was drawing the image they caught my eye.

There is always the possability they firmware update to diminish the effect. Though there is always a chance they dont
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post #112 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 07:12 AM
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There is always the possability they firmware update to diminish the effect. Though there is always a chance they dont

I was under the impression that it was a hardware issue. The use of IOP style full array back lighting gives LG the ability to have more dimming zones while using less physical leds. So, no firmware would be able to correct it.
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post #113 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 07:20 AM
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I was under the impression that it was a hardware issue. The use of IOP style full array back lighting gives LG the ability to have more dimming zones while using less physical leds. So, no firmware would be able to correct it.

Perhaps you are right. I was just kinda figuring that they could knock down the intensity some or soemthing like that. Engineers are pretty smart guys

Anyway Maybe Im wrong, Isnt the first wont be the last time
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post #114 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 07:40 AM
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In my opinion, yes.
The 9G Elite Kuro and Sammy B8500 are probably closest in PQ.
Though as Happy Nightmares pointed out, the line issue is something that I would have to live with for an extended period of time before I knew just how much it would bother me. On static images the lines were faint enough not to bother me, but a couple of times when the image changed and the TV was drawing the image they caught my eye.

When you say that in your opinion, it "beats the Sammy," do you mean the B8500, or one of the 2010 models?

Thank you very much for your informative reviews.
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post #115 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 09:16 AM
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In my opinion, yes.
The 9G Elite Kuro and Sammy B8500 are probably closest in PQ.
Though as Happy Nightmares pointed out, the line issue is something that I would have to live with for an extended period of time before I knew just how much it would bother me. On static images the lines were faint enough not to bother me, but a couple of times when the image changed and the TV was drawing the image they caught my eye.

hmm. Well thanks for the advice! Your opinion means a lot in my tv choice to me! As I'm sure you get the chance to view and review many tvs at any givin time. You have a chance to view them at an even higher level then most people do because you can bring em to life with the knowledge you had on tvs. I have been on a big debate about trying this tv out. Everytime I go to the Store they never seem to have a dsplay model out or anything. But baised on everything I've heard about this tv and what I hear from you. It's a tv I'd have to try. One thing in question though.

This tvs panel life is suppose to be only 30,000 hours. Isn't that a little short for such a high end tv?
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post #116 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 09:21 AM
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hmm. Well thanks for the advice! Your opinion means a lot in my tv choice to me! As I'm sure you get the chance to view and review many tvs at any givin time. You have a chance to view them at an even higher level then most people do because you can bring em to life with the knowledge you had on tvs. I have been on a big debate about trying this tv out. Everytime I go to the Store they never seem to have a dsplay model out or anything. But baised on everything I've heard about this tv and what I hear from you. It's a tv I'd have to try. One thing in question though.

This tvs panel life is suppose to be only 30,000 hours. Isn't that a little short for such a high end tv?

8 hours a day for 10 years is an awful lot of viewing time.
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post #117 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 09:46 AM
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hmm. Well thanks for the advice! Your opinion means a lot in my tv choice to me! As I'm sure you get the chance to view and review many tvs at any givin time. You have a chance to view them at an even higher level then most people do because you can bring em to life with the knowledge you had on tvs. I have been on a big debate about trying this tv out. Everytime I go to the Store they never seem to have a dsplay model out or anything. But baised on everything I've heard about this tv and what I hear from you. It's a tv I'd have to try. One thing in question though.

This tvs panel life is suppose to be only 30,000 hours. Isn't that a little short for such a high end tv?

That is the viewing lifetime of a crt. An old CRT projection was 15,000 hrs.
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post #118 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 10:06 AM
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Still. Isn't that a little low? 30,000 hours for a 2010? I thought most lcds have at least 60,000 and some plasmas known to have 100,000

30,000 hour backlight life just seems to short. Maybe that's why they had to mention it? Because it's lower then most tvs?
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post #119 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 10:09 AM
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Still. Isn't that a little low? 30,000 hours for a 2010? I thought most lcds have at least 60,000 and some plasmas known to have 100,000

30,000 hour backlight life just seems to short. Maybe that's why they had to mention it? Because it's lower then most tvs?

Your power supply or some board is going to go before then and It will be more cost effective to buy a newer tech set by then anyway. Its reaally a big fat dont care.
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post #120 of 1599 Old 04-28-2010, 11:28 AM
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What? I don't understand what you are saying.
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