Which TV brand would you buy without warranty? - Page 3 - AVS Forum
View Poll Results: Which TV brand would you buy without warranty?
Samsung 0 0%
LG 0 0%
Toshiba 0 0%
Sharp 0 0%
Insignia 0 0%
Panasonic 0 0%
Sony 0 0%
Philips 0 0%
Westinghouse 0 0%
Magnavox 0 0%
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post #61 of 75 Old 04-26-2012, 12:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomieG View Post

I completely agree, as would any other owner of the crap Sony SXRD HDTV's.

Came here to say this. My dead A2000 has soured me on Sony TV products, and Sony in general. Probably not entirely rational, what with SXRD being different technology from full-panel LCD, but there it is. I unfairly skewed the poll by voting Sharp, when I don't even have my Sharp Elite yet. Sorry for being evil.
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post #62 of 75 Old 04-28-2012, 12:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S View Post

Sanyo is now owned by Panasonic, not a bad thing given Panny's history. Our experience with RCA since 07 has been that they are the most returned brand we sold.

Correct. Sanyo is now owned by Panasonic, but Panasonic continues to allow Sanyo to run its own company. Sanyo designs all of the TVs in-house, with different parts, different picture quality, and different on-screen menus. A Sanyo TV works completely different from Panasonic, despite same ownership. Sanyo TVs tend to be less-bright with lower picture quality, cheaper panel screen made by Chi-Mei, cheaper speaker quality, thinner plastic exterior case, and etc.

Were most of the RCA TVs returned as defective or broken, or people didn't like the picture quality?
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post #63 of 75 Old 04-28-2012, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InYourEyes View Post

Correct. Sanyo is now owned by Panasonic, but Panasonic continues to allow Sanyo to run its own company. Sanyo designs all of the TVs in-house, with different parts, different picture quality, and different on-screen menus. A Sanyo TV works completely different from Panasonic, despite same ownership. Sanyo TVs tend to be less-bright with lower picture quality, cheaper panel screen made by Chi-Mei, cheaper speaker quality, thinner plastic exterior case, and etc.

Were most of the RCA TVs returned as defective or broken, or people didn't like the picture quality?

most of the RCAs were returned as defective. Usually involved failure of one or more HDMI ports.

Steve S.
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post #64 of 75 Old 04-28-2012, 11:11 AM
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Just came back from Wal-Mart this morning, and I found out that Sanyo outsource some TVs to Compal, which also produce TVs for Toshiba. All Sanyo LED models (any size) and one 55" LCD are made by Compal. The rest are made by Sanyo. It's funny to see that the cheaper Sanyo's basic LCD models are still made by Sanyo.
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post #65 of 75 Old 05-01-2012, 11:06 PM
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Also, two new 2012 Panasonic LCD models, TC-L32C5 and TC-L42U5, are outsourced to Compal this year, with panel screens from Chi-Mei without IPS feature.
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post #66 of 75 Old 05-01-2012, 11:19 PM
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The C5 has typical subpar viewing angles of non-IPS panels. More surprising to me was the fact that it's missing the SD slot and has a digital coaxial (?!) audio out rather than optical like every other Panasonic. Really a shame considering the C-series sets were my go-to 32-inchers.

ht Panasonic 60" ZT60, Monitor Audio: Silver RX6, RX Centre, Radius 90HD; Martinlogan Dynamo 700, Marantz SR5006, PS3, Oppo BDP-103D
2ch Sony KDL-32W650A, Sony BDP-S1000ES, Marantz PM8004, JVC T-X3 tuner, Monitor Audio Silver RX1, REL T3, Apple TV, Peachtree Audio DAC•iT, Sennheiser HD598
lr Panasonic 50" ST60, Sony BDP-S5100, Apple TV
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post #67 of 75 Old 12-11-2012, 03:31 PM
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Too Late to rate? I will anyway!biggrin.gif
Panasonic.
I looked around at the Audio/video equipment in my house that has not failed or been repaired. A 30 year old Panasonic receiver, a 25 year old Panasonic CRT, a 20 year old Technics receiver and a 20 year old Panasonic CD Player (I also have a six year old Technics setup for my surround sound system, but that should still be working .... right?). I didn't even realize this was the case. It just happens that the other Audio/Video stuff we bought during the same period , Toshiba, Sony, and Macintosh all packed it in. On a separate sort of related note. My daughter still has an earlier Audio setup of mine which is still working ( bought it in 1976). Pioneer receiver, and Pioneer tape deck with 25 watt Sanyo speakers. but I still vote Panasonic, 'cause where are Pioneer now that we need them?wink.gif
Dave

Last week at a party, I was dancing with my neighbours wife when she rubbed against me, put her hand on my butt, slid her tongue into my ear and said " I want you to take me upstairs and spank me". I said "I can't think of any reason to spank you. Your behavior has been absolutely perfect so far."
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post #68 of 75 Old 03-29-2014, 07:14 PM
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I submitted a post before realizing it hadn't corresponded with the post to which I wished to reply (my post didn't quote the source post). So when I tried to delete my post and create a new one with the source post quotes, I couldn't find a way to delete my original post. When one simply "selects all" and tries to cut, that won't work, as a message is produced stating one may not leave the field blank. That is why you are reading this. My actual post is #69 below.

 

If someone knows a method to delete complete posts, please tell me.

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post #69 of 75 Old 03-30-2014, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InYourEyes View Post
 

50-year consumer electronics reliability average curve since 1960 (currently):

1. Panasonic/Quasar (Matsushita)
2. Toshiba
3. Sharp
4. Sanyo/Fisher
5. NEC/Fujitsu
6. Sony
7. Funai/Symphonic/Emerson/Magnavox/Sylvania
8. JVC
9. Hitachi
10. Orion/Sansui/Emerson/Toshiba
11. Zenith
12. Samsung
13. RCA
14. LG/GoldStar/Zenith
15. Curtis Mathes
16. Mitsubishi/MGA
17. GoVideo/CineVision
18. Phlips/Philco/Magnavox/Sylvania
19. Daewoo
20. RCA/GE/ProScan/Thomson (the worst)

70-year consumer electronics reliability average curve since 1960 (prediction, not actual, but good reference):

1. Panasonic/Quasar (Matsushita)
2. Toshiba
3. Sanyo/Fisher
4. NEC/Fujitsu
5. Sharp
6. Sony
7. Funai/Symphonic/Emerson/Magnavox/Philips/Sylvania/Toshiba
8. Apple/Sharp/Sony (Foxconn)
9. JVC
10. Orion/Sansui/Emerson/Hitachi/JVC/Sanyo/Toshiba
11. Hitachi
12. Dynex/Insignia/Prima (XOCECO)
13. Zenith
14. LG/GoldStar/Zenith
15. RCA
16. Vizio/Hitachi/JVC (Amtran)
17. Samsung
18. Toshiba/Panasonic/Sanyo (Compal)
19. Hisense
20. TCL/RCA/Panasonic/Toshiba
21. Curtis Mathes
22. GoVideo/CineVision
23. Westinghouse/Apex/Element/Haier/iSymphony/RCA/Sceptre/Seiki/Sigmac/Silo (TongFang)
24. Daewoo
25. Phlips/Philco/Magnavox/Sylvania
26. Mitsubishi/MGA
27. Coby
28. RCA/GE/ProScan/Thomson
29. Curtis/GPX/Oritron/Supersonic/Sylvania
30. Toshiba/RCA/Craig/Venturer (Alco)
31. Vizio/Apex/Digix/Dynex/Insignia/KCPI (Contel) (now the worst manufacturer in the world)

Eleven new OEM manufacturers, all Chinese, have been added to the 70-year list.

 

Toshiba (Compal), which makes 95% of TVs for Toshiba right now, is rated eighteenth (#18) most reliable manufacturer in the world, which is considered as average.

 

I don't understand some things about these two lists--first, the difference between the two lists other than a 20-year time frame; secondly, what you mean by "prediction, not actual, but good reference?"

 

The other thing I am confused about is why, for example, one model of television set, Toshiba, appears on these lists twice--at #2 and again at #10 (Orion/Sansui/Emerson/Toshiba).

 

A sales clerk with whom I spoke about TVs at a Target store recently recommended Samsung and Vizio sets, specifically warned against buying Westinghouse because "they break a lot." I realize today's Westinghouse is not the original Westinghouse, which used to manufacture good, reliable home appliances such as air conditioners, radios, refrigerators, etc. But those were also probably the days when these items were still being manufactured in the United States.

 

The Target clerk was also not keen about Magnavox, would only say "They're okay." He also divulged Vizio was, at one time, owned by Target, but are now owned by Sony. Vizio is rated poor on one of these lists, Samsung in the middle on both lists. Why does this seem to contradict what the Target clerk told me of his experience with TV sets?

 

I live on a fixed income, cannot afford, nor would I really be that interested in a huge-screen TV even could I afford one. For someone who, in my college and young adult years survived with a 9" Admiral TV set using a coat hanger for an antenna, ever since I had my first 19" Sears color set life has been an upgrade. I have decided a 32" set is about as large as I may go now. I would like to spend only about $250, perhaps a bit more. On the other hand, I want a set that will last about 10 years if possible. That is about how long I understand a good TV set should last. As I keep mine turned on longer than the average person since I am disabled and home quite a bit, naturally I don't expect mine to last as long as average. On the other hand, I don't want to buy a new TV set and have it last only a year or two.

 

So, what few brands of television sets would you say are relatively inexpensive, but still good quality brands for the savings?

 

My most recent TV sets' history--obtained an RCA (Thomson Electronics, not the original RCA owned by David Sarnoff, who also owned NBC Radio & TV) set about 2000, which lasted about seven years before problems and eventual replacement. Currently, I have a Sanyo set I purchased about 2007, am starting to experience green discoloration on edge of screen, contrast not as good as originally.

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post #70 of 75 Old 03-30-2014, 01:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmo View Post

I don't understand some things about these two lists--first, the difference between the two lists other than a 20-year time frame; secondly, what you mean by "prediction, not actual, but good reference?"

The other thing I am confused about is why, for example, one model of television set, Toshiba, appears on these lists twice--at #2 and again at #10 (Orion/Sansui/Emerson/Toshiba).

A sales clerk with whom I spoke about TVs at a Target store recently recommended Samsung and Vizio sets, specifically warned against buying Westinghouse because "they break a lot." I realize today's Westinghouse is not the original Westinghouse, which used to manufacture good, reliable home appliances such as air conditioners, radios, refrigerators, etc. But those were also probably the days when these items were still being manufactured in the United States.

The Target clerk was also not keen about Magnavox, would only say "They're okay." He also divulged Vizio was, at one time, owned by Target, but are now owned by Sony. Vizio is rated poor on one of these lists, Samsung in the middle on both lists. Why does this seem to contradict what the Target clerk told me of his experience with TV sets?

I live on a fixed income, cannot afford, nor would I really be that interested in a huge-screen TV even could I afford one. For someone who, in my college and young adult years survived with a 9" Admiral TV set using a coat hanger for an antenna, ever since I had my first 19" Sears color set life has been an upgrade. I have decided a 32" set is about as large as I may go now. I would like to spend only about $250, perhaps a bit more. On the other hand, I want a set that will last about 10 years if possible. That is about how long I understand a good TV set should last. As I keep mine turned on longer than the average person since I am disabled and home quite a bit, naturally I don't expect mine to last as long as average. On the other hand, I don't want to buy a new TV set and have it last only a year or two.

So, what few brands of television sets would you say are relatively inexpensive, but still good quality brands for the savings?

My most recent TV sets' history--obtained an RCA (Thomson Electronics, not the original RCA owned by David Sarnoff, who also owned NBC Radio & TV) set about 2000, which lasted about seven years before problems and eventual replacement. Currently, I have a Sanyo set I purchased about 2007, am starting to experience green discoloration on edge of screen, contrast not as good as originally.
Hello, welcome to AVS Forum, and I will be more than happy to respond to you.

As you know by now, in today's consumer disposable electronic world, new TVs DON'T last as long as the older CRT tube versions we had before, regardless of what brand you choose. New TVs now have an average lifespan of 5 years of trouble-free service, with some sets going for 7-8 years if lucky under moderate use. 10 years working trouble-free is considered to be lucky (although achievable) nowadays. It needs be well taken care of, and you must set the backlight level no higher than 25% level. People set their TVs at 100% backlight level all the time with brightest picture, and that's what causing all the TV problems occurring after 2-3 years of use.

In terms of selecting a TV brand, the Chinese TV makers under unfamiliar brands (including Westinghouse and Polaroid of course) are likely going to do worse in reliability with shorter lifespan than the Japanese and Korean brands. The exceptions are Foxxconn (Sony), TCL (RCA), and Vizio (JVC), which are reported to be good quality by Chinese standards.

My 50 and 70 year brand reliability comparison predictions are based on the lifespan and longevity of the older TVs in the past. The Japanese brands are indeed at top of the reliability rankings and had so for many years in the past. Panasonic has always been a leader and rated #1 in reliability for every products out there worldwide, and continues to be so today. Panasonic is identical to Toyota in the way how they run their corporation. Toshiba also has an excellent reliability record and identical to Honda in the past, but Toshiba is now the brand you should stay away from due to the outsourcing (not made by Toshiba) as consumer electronics business is no longer a priority to them. In the past, majority of Toshiba TVs were made Orion, so hence the same rating with Orion/Sansui. Toshiba now largely focuses on profitable storage divisions, such as hard drives, flash card memory drives, DVD burner drives, laptop computers, which are all reportably rated #1 (or near #1) in reliability.

Some low-end budget, but high-quality, TVs I can recommend to you are the JVC (made by Vizio but at 30% lower cost) found in Costco stores (if you have a membership), and it's my #1 pick right now. Best Buy also has the Sharp brand 32" TV made by XOCECO in China with decent reliability record. For general retail stores, Walmart is definitely the place to shop for TVs before Target, because of Walmart's generous, no questions 90-day return policy on televisions if something goes wrong, and their 2-year extended warranty package is the lowest cost out there. Target is not the friendliest place to deal with TV returns and warranty repairs at least in my experience, and their TVs are usually poorer quality than Walmart because of higher number of Chinese TV makers Target stores are selling. Walmart supplies more Funai-made TVs (Emerson, Magnavox, and Philips), a Japanese company, than Target, so their reliability track record is a little better. Walmart TVs can be considered to be more-reliable than Target TVs in most cases.

If going higher-end, consider LG before Samsung. LG TVs have had much better reliability track record than Samsung in recent years, and complaints on problem with LG TVs are always over 25% difference.

Feel free to reply at anytime for any further questions. Good luck in selecting your high-quality, affordable TV.
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post #71 of 75 Old 03-30-2014, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InYourEyes View Post


Samsung is NEVER known for reliability, despite it being the #1 best-seller worldwide, and they do NOT have the reputation yet for reliability. People that say Samsung is the most reliable are the ones that have one that is still working fine, with no history proof, so they continue to buy more. One day in the future, Samsung will get you, and Samsung will give you a defective item you will really hate. Samsung, lately, is slipping in the overall reliability charts, since it last peaked in early-2000s, and Samsung already lost its place to LG. Today, LG is now the most-reliable Korean electronic manufacturer.

For most people, including me previously, they have had Samsung products in the past that already broke, didn't last very long, poor design, and etc. (excluding microwave ovens, these have been reliable).

Also, I have repeatedly told most of the poor, hard-working, blue-collar people to stay away from Samsung at all costs, since they usually cannot afford another one if it stops working. I tell them to look at Sanyo or Funai (Emerson and Magnavox) instead, and save their money. More expensive TV doesn't mean it will be more reliable. Period. These blue-collar workers are surprised to hear that Wal-Mart sell more reliable, longer-lasting TVs than at Best Buy, Costco, and Sears.

Finally, TV technicians will NEVER say Samsung is the most-reliable brand. Go ahead and ask every one of them if you don't believe. 99.9% of TV technicians nationwide will vote Panasonic more reliable than Samsung.

Well, at least the Gen Y people are learning here. Baby-boomers and Gen X people already know Samsung's yucky past.

 

 

Although, I found THIS (from another consumer another electronic review) about Emerson TV sets bought on "Black Friday" [I cleaned up the grammar and typos a bit.]--

 

"We bought two of these TV's on Black Friday from Walmart last year and wouldn't you know it that both TV's had the inverter power boards go out on them within two days of each other. We are just days out of warranty and nothing we can do except pay to have another board installed at $190 dollars each. Save your money and frustration and buy a good TV. Spend the extra money and get a good TV. My kids were terribly disappointed as these were Christmas presents for their rooms.

Key points for trouble shooting the board problems are:

 

1 - No power when you turn on TV even after trying other outlets and doing the 30 minute unplug and reset process explained in the owner manual
2- When you take the back off the unit to make sure the cord is good you will find a blown fuse in the lower right hand corner of the main power board. ( 4 amp 125 v fuse )
3- Replace the fuse, if it works again congrats you got off cheap !, most likely it will blow again because the transformers on the board are faulty. ( which caused the fuse to blow the first time)
4- Now you have to order a new board at the cost of 60 dollars (cheapest i found on eBay) and replace yourself. Or take it to a shop who will do the same repair for about $190.
5- its about a two hour job to do the repair yourself. Changing the board is very easy. Only 6 connections to make and they all are unique so you can't plug them in wrong. The only problem is there has not been an upgrade that i know of on the boards and you are uncertain as to how long the new board will last."

 

 

And for the flip side of the coin, there is this one too--

 

 

"Just bought some of these from Walmart on Black Friday. The model number is slightly different, but it has the same specs. This is a good to very good TV overall, but an excellent TV for the $148 price and remains a bargain even after paying $10-$15 for an extended warranty.
 
1.) Based on the other reviews I read I bought the extended 2 year replacement warranty from Walmart for $15. You can buy this warranty for up to 30 days AFTER buying the TV, so it is still not too late if you bought the TV on Black Friday. If you do not want the Walmart warranty then the manufacturer also has an optional warranty for $9.99 that extends the labor warranty from 90 days to a year. With this the labor will match the parts standard one year warranty. Consumer reports said most problems occur within the 1st year, so either extended warranty would cover this period.
 
2.) Like most HDTVs make sure to adjust the settings on the cable/satellite provider's box then adjust the TV settings. I had a friend that bought the same models and complained about the picture not being as clear as standard definition and returned the tv instantly. After questioning him in more detail it was his 1st HDTV and he did not adjust the settings.
 
3.) I have Time Warner and adjusted the cable box box resolution to auto select. Then I adjusted the picture to Personal and used the following customized settings:
 
Backlight 20, Contrast 38, Brightness 40, Color 54, Tint G2, Sharpness 16. For Advanced Settings I set the Color Alignment to Normal, left the Noise Reduction, Black Stretch, and Dynamic Contrast On, and the Gamma at Gamma 1. With these settings the picture quality is Very Good.
 
I am sure some other TV's on the market have better video quality and / or more features (Samsung Model UN32EH4050 Costco $239 today), but they cost at least 40% more than the Walmart $148 Black Friday price. However if you bought one of the Emersons on Black Friday and you take the time to buy the extended warranty and properly adjust the settings, then I believe you'll find out this was one of the BEST DEALS out there!"

 

 

So, I think if one does purchase a less-expensive TV set for the savings, considering most issues seem to arise within a year of purchase, best to buy either a manufacturer's or store extended warranty, just to cover one's self. Spending that extra $10 or $15 on the extended warranty might be worth it when faced with some major defect in an item six months to a year or two down the road. One would still come away with a less-expensive option than resorting to the purchase of a TV set one really may not afford, or having to spend the equivalent in repair costs of buying another of the same "sale" item. If one has to spend another $200-300 in repairs, then the value of that sale item has been lost. But another $10 for an extra bit of security isn't a hardship in most cases.

 

I appreciate your advice for those of us on a low budget, though, to consider Emerson, Magnavox, and Sanyo if one may not afford a higher caliber of TV set model. I just wanted to offer a little more perspective by adding these reviews, as I think this will provide just a bit more of a security blanket for persons reading this, to heed the old adage "Buyer beware!," and not be so quick to disregard extended warranties in all cases. Man, it's a horrible feeling when one has just spent money on a Big Ticket item and to have it malfunction or not work at all. I realize the relativity factor. But for those of us on a fixed income, spending $200 or $300 on an item is just what it would be for a more affluent person to shelve out $2000 or $30000 and have the same bad luck.

 

One last thing--if one is on the shelf about a major investment such as a TV set, or perhaps waiting until some better deals are available, or better products are turned out, one may consider trying second-hand (Goodwill, Salvation Army, other thrift stores, etc.) stores. I'm not kidding. I once needed a new TV set, couldn't afford a brand new one, and found an old Zenith for which I only had to spend $30. That TV set had a sharp-enough picture, good sound, and lasted me about five or six years. That may not seem long, but remember it was already a used set, probably about 20 years old and repaired for resale. Considering new TVs are considered good if one gets 10 years out of them, five years on a used/refurbished set is NOT BAD at all. Or even just for a secondary set for a kid's bedroom, etc.

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post #72 of 75 Old 03-30-2014, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmo View Post


Although, I found THIS (from another consumer another electronic review) about Emerson TV sets bought on "Black Friday" --

"We bought two of these TV's on Black Friday from Walmart last year and wouldn't you know it that both TV's had the inverter power boards go out on them within two days of each other. We are just days out of warranty and nothing we can do except pay to have another board installed at $190 dollars each. Save your money and frustration and buy a good TV. Spend the extra money and get a good TV. My kids were terribly disappointed as these were Christmas presents for their rooms.
Key points for trouble shooting the board problems are:

1 - No power when you turn on TV even after trying other outlets and doing the 30 minute unplug and reset process explained in the owner manual

2- When you take the back off the unit to make sure the cord is good you will find a blown fuse in the lower right hand corner of the main power board. ( 4 amp 125 v fuse )

3- Replace the fuse, if it works again congrats you got off cheap !, most likely it will blow again because the transformers on the board are faulty. ( which caused the fuse to blow the first time)

4- Now you have to order a new board at the cost of 60 dollars (cheapest i found on eBay) and replace yourself. Or take it to a shop who will do the same repair for about $190.

5- its about a two hour job to do the repair yourself. Changing the board is very easy. Only 6 connections to make and they all are unique so you can't plug them in wrong. The only problem is there has not been an upgrade that i know of on the boards and you are uncertain as to how long the new board will last."



And for the flip side of the coin, there is this one too--


"Just bought some of these from Walmart on Black Friday. The model number is slightly different, but it has the same specs. This is a good to very good TV overall, but an excellent TV for the $148 price and remains a bargain even after paying $10-$15 for an extended warranty.
 
1.) Based on the other reviews I read I bought the extended 2 year replacement warranty from Walmart for $15. You can buy this warranty for up to 30 days AFTER buying the TV, so it is still not too late if you bought the TV on Black Friday. If you do not want the Walmart warranty then the manufacturer also has an optional warranty for $9.99 that extends the labor warranty from 90 days to a year. With this the labor will match the parts standard one year warranty. Consumer reports said most problems occur within the 1st year, so either extended warranty would cover this period.
 
2.) Like most HDTVs make sure to adjust the settings on the cable/satellite provider's box then adjust the TV settings. I had a friend that bought the same models and complained about the picture not being as clear as standard definition and returned the tv instantly. After questioning him in more detail it was his 1st HDTV and he did not adjust the settings.
 
3.) I have Time Warner and adjusted the cable box box resolution to auto select. Then I adjusted the picture to Personal and used the following customized settings:
 
Backlight 20, Contrast 38, Brightness 40, Color 54, Tint G2, Sharpness 16. For Advanced Settings I set the Color Alignment to Normal, left the Noise Reduction, Black Stretch, and Dynamic Contrast On, and the Gamma at Gamma 1. With these settings the picture quality is Very Good.
 
I am sure some other TV's on the market have better video quality and / or more features (Samsung Model UN32EH4050 Costco $239 today), but they cost at least 40% more than the Walmart $148 Black Friday price. However if you bought one of the Emersons on Black Friday and you take the time to buy the extended warranty and properly adjust the settings, then I believe you'll find out this was one of the BEST DEALS out there!"


So, I think if one does purchase a less-expensive TV set for the savings, considering most issues seem to arise within a year of purchase, best to buy either a manufacturer's or store extended warranty, just to cover one's self. Spending that extra $10 or $15 on the extended warranty might be worth it when faced with some major defect in an item six months to a year or two down the road. One would still come away with a less-expensive option than resorting to the purchase of a TV set one really may not afford, or having to spend the equivalent in repair costs of buying another of the same "sale" item. If one has to spend another $200-300 in repairs, then the value of that sale item has been lost. But another $10 for an extra bit of security isn't a hardship in most cases.

I appreciate your advice for those of us on a low budget, though, to consider Emerson, Magnavox, and Sanyo if one may not afford a higher caliber of TV set model. I just wanted to offer a little more perspective by adding these reviews, as I think this will provide just a bit more of a security blanket for persons reading this, to heed the old adage "Buyer beware!," and not be so quick to disregard extended warranties in all cases. Man, it's a horrible feeling when one has just spent money on a Big Ticket item and to have it malfunction or not work at all. I realize the relativity factor. But for those of us on a fixed income, spending $200 or $300 on an item is just what it would be for a more affluent person to shelve out $2000 or $30000 and have the same bad luck.

One last thing--if one is on the shelf about a major investment such as a TV set, or perhaps waiting until some better deals are available, or better products are turned out, one may consider trying second-hand (Goodwill, Salvation Army, other thrift stores, etc.) stores. I'm not kidding. I once needed a new TV set, couldn't afford a brand new one, and found an old Zenith for which I only had to spend $30. That TV set had a sharp-enough picture, good sound, and lasted me about five or six years. That may not seem long, but remember it was already a used set, probably about 20 years old and repaired for resale. Considering new TVs are considered good if one gets 10 years out of them, five years on a used/refurbished set is NOT BAD at all. Or even just for a secondary set for a kid's bedroom, etc.
Emerson TVs are considered as excellent value in most cases, especially Black Friday sale, and have received above-average reliability record in most years when Funai make them. Certainly, there are lemon Emerson TVs out there, and the problems can be unexpected, but all brands out there produce lemons accidentally in uncertain days with either good or bad reviews. Currently, Emerson has the same reliability rating with Sanyo and Sony according to Consumer Reports with only 4% failure rate (96% of responders reported no problem with their Emerson TVs in 3 years of use).

Used CRT TVs are now given away for FREE in most cases if you find them on Craigslist under free section. Most of them work. It's not worth paying $20 at thrift stores anymore. They just don't need them anymore, and you can't sell it to someone anymore. It's certanily possible to pick up a free CRT tube TV and it works for 10 years no problem.
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post #73 of 75 Old 03-30-2014, 03:22 PM
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Updated info. of TV mfrs and brands


Tom Lo, DIGITIMES Research, Taipei [Friday 13 December 2013]
TPV Technology, Foxconn Electronics, Compal Electronics, Wistron, Amtran Technology and Pegatron will ship 35.95 million OEM/ODM LCD TVs in 2014, increasing 5.3% on year and accounting for 16.9% of global shipments, according to Digitimes Research.

TPV will ship 16.85 million LCD TVs with Philips and Vizio to be major clients, followed by Foxconn with 7.2 million units and Sony to be the major client, Compal with 4.3 million units mainly to Toshiba, Wistron with 3.6 million units mainly to Vizio, Amtran with two million units mainly to Sharp and Vizio, and Pegatron with 1.2 million units mainly to Toshiba, Digitimes Research indicated.
By Tom Lo

This article is an excerpt from a Chinese-language Digitimes Research report.
http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20131213PD200.html

Vizio has released orders equivalent to 40% of its 2014 TV shipments
to TPV Technology and 30% to Wistron, according to supply chain makers.
http://www.digitimes.com/topic/ultra_hd/a001261.html
Philips TV business has been sold to TPV .

RCA is now owned by ON corp. and are no longer TCL products .

Dynex Insignia are no longer XOCECO they are Hisense mfr.


It is rumored Hisense makes the Sharp Best Buy exclusive models also .
(needs validation)

Emerson ,Magnavox and Poloriod *may* be TPV or Changhong brands now
(needs validation) they are not believed to be Funai anymore.


other news :
Quote:
FOXCONN COULD BRING VIZIO TV PRODUCTION TO US

Foxconn has already confirmed a research facility Pennsylvania, but could soon start producing TVs on American soil, too. Foxconn CEO, Terry Gou, is very interested in expanding TV production to the US, according to WSJ.

Foxconn is currently producing TVs for Vizio in China, but Vizio that could be an important partner in bringing TV production to the US, according to the report. At CES 2014, Vizio showcased an impressive 120-inch LCD TV, produced by Foxconn. Terry Gou commented specifically on the TV, saying;

“We have many big projects in the U.S. coming up,” said Gou. “For instance, is it possible to make our 120-inch TVs in Taiwan and ship them over? It’s impossible. We have to make them on site.”
By Rasmus Larsen
http://www.flatpanelshd.com/news.php?subaction=showfull&id=1392627358

I have a 2013 Sony KDL 40R450A made by Foxconn in Mexico with a Samsung SPVA panel in the bedroom good picture and sound
it's decent looking and doesn't seem as cheaply made as a lot of other similar sets although they might me more alike than not inside.

My other sets are a 2013 - 55" Samsung Plasma , a 2012 - 32" Toshiba CCFL/LCD , a 2013 - 42" LG 42LN5300 LED/LCD (gave it to my son for a second set so so picture ) and lastly a 2011 - 40" Dynex CCFL /LCD with a Samsung panel actually not a bad set at all better picture than the LG.

Reliability wise as a consumer I've had tremendous luck over the years with Sony ,Sharp and Toshiba TV's although that can vary from model to model and change over the years YMMV . Luckily I never owned a CRT RPTV or DLP RPTV . The Sammie Plasma is my first Sammie it works well so far time will tell .

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Originally Posted by InYourEyes View Post


Emerson TVs are considered as excellent value in most cases, especially Black Friday sale, and have received above-average reliability record in most years when Funai make them. Certainly, there are lemon Emerson TVs out there, and the problems can be unexpected, but all brands out there produce lemons accidentally in uncertain days with either good or bad reviews. Currently, Emerson has the same reliability rating with Sanyo and Sony according to Consumer Reports with only 4% failure rate (96% of responders reported no problem with their Emerson TVs in 3 years of use).

Used CRT TVs are now given away for FREE in most cases if you find them on Craigslist under free section. Most of them work. It's not worth paying $20 at thrift stores anymore. They just don't need them anymore, and you can't sell it to someone anymore. It's certanily possible to pick up a free CRT tube TV and it works for 10 years no problem.

 

Okay, I just went to look at some TV sets a few nights ago at Best Buy and Walmart, taking into consideration your advice, InYourEyes.

 

I saw what I think must be that Sharp 32" LED set (really manufactured by XOCECO of China) to which you referred in your previous post. Its cost was about $250 and with a 1080p resolution. But there were also some other models on sale on the other side of the room at Best Buy, about which we hadn't discussed. For example, I found a Panasonic 32" LED set, 720p, selling for $199, but manufactured in Mexico. You didn't mention Mexico in your discussion of which nations manufacture the most reliable TV sets, only Japan, Korea and China, best-to-worst in that order (with some exceptions, such as that Sharp/XOCECO at Best Buy, noted). So how do Mexican-made TV sets compare with the TVs manufactured in the Asian nations you already mentioned? Will you place Mexico into that rank-order list, please? This would also be helpful to other consumers, I think.

 

And are there any TV sets manufactured in the United States anymore? Do you think there is a possibility of the U.S. ever reclaiming its status a leading manufacturer of electronics, as in the days of the original RCA, Westinghouse and Zenith? Or would this require a reversal of politics to something resembling more stringently protectionist economic policies?

 

I also sent you a private message, InYourEyes, some more questions related to TVs, other questions about other electronics and audio/video issues. If you prefer not to answer in private, will you at least please suggest to which sub-forums I may post each of the questions in that private message?

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I have a 2013 Sony KDL 40R450A in the bedroom made by Foxconn Mexico with a Sansung SPVA panel in it .
A Toshiba by Compal w/Samsung SPVA panel (China) ,a Samsung Plasma by Samsung (So. Korea) , a Dynex LCD w/ Samsung panel made by Hi Sense (China ) , and lastly an LG42Ln5300 made by LG .w/LGD panel (So. korea)

No issues with any of the sets so far . The outsourced Sony and Toshiba have better pictures than the Dynex or LG the Sammie Plasma is best picture of all the sets I have. Lots of sets are being made in Mexico by Foxconn probably TPV also and others .

Hires Music formats ..............."Why does it sound like a CD ?" ............. can we make it louder "?
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