Flashlighting / Lightbleed on new LG 55LM7600 - What is "acceptable"? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 11:07 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi Guys,

I am new to the forum, and wanted to get some experienced insight as to what should be considered "acceptable" lightbleed/flashlighting. I have just purchased my first edge-lit LED-LCD 3D TV, and I went with the new LG 55LM7600. I have always been a fan of LG and have always had good luck with the quality and reliability of them.

However, my new TV has, what I would consider, alot of lightbleeding. I contacted LG Support and looked on their website under Q&A, and was told by an associate that this TV should not have lightbleeding. Now, I would assume that there will be some since this is a con for edge-lit TVs, but what should I accept as reasonable? I do not want to play the TV replacement game and take multiple TV's on and off the wall and back to the store, but I certainly do not want a bad looking TV after spending $1750 on it.

I have attached some pictures below. Please give me your input on whether or not my TV is beyond the acceptable lightbleed, especially if you have one of these models and can compare.

Thanks.

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed4.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed3.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed2.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed1.jpg
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post #2 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfin3591 View Post

Hi Guys,

I am new to the forum, and wanted to get some experienced insight as to what should be considered "acceptable" lightbleed/flashlighting. I have just purchased my first edge-lit LED-LCD 3D TV, and I went with the new LG 55LM7600. I have always been a fan of LG and have always had good luck with the quality and reliability of them.

However, my new TV has, what I would consider, alot of lightbleeding. I contacted LG Support and looked on their website under Q&A, and was told by an associate that this TV should not have lightbleeding. Now, I would assume that there will be some since this is a con for edge-lit TVs, but what should I accept as reasonable? I do not want to play the TV replacement game and take multiple TV's on and off the wall and back to the store, but I certainly do not want a bad looking TV after spending $1750 on it.

I have attached some pictures below. Please give me your input on whether or not my TV is beyond the acceptable lightbleed, especially if you have one of these models and can compare.

Thanks.

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed4.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed3.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed2.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed1.jpg

That does look rather bad, obviously hard to judge as the camera can make it look worse (or better).

Also what is acceptable to me may not be to you.

I guess a good place to start is with settings. What picture settings are you currently using? Ones to avoid are Vivid/Dynamic, usually Movie/cinema mode are best and then tweak from there. Also lowering the backlight.

Obviously you shouldn't have to adjust the picture to much to reduce an issue you are unhappy with. If simple adjustments don't help and it bothers you, i would suggest a replacement set. If that is the same it is up to you weather you try again and as you say play the replacement game, or try a different brand/technology ie plasma or full led backlit.

Aaron
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post #3 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 11:35 AM
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that looks exactly like mine, I returned it to BB and the replacement looked similar.

once I tweaked my settings a little bit and put local dimming on Med or High, it mostly went away.

It sucks but not noticeable during regular viewing. They only real drawback to this otherwise impressive set. im resigned to the fact that Ill keep this set since its showing up in the flagship LM9600 as well and I prefer passive 3d with a thin bezel.

ive heard some claim that they have sets with NO flashlighting in the corners but not sure If I believe that exists. Again, you can drastically reduce this in your calibration.
though these settings are only applied to a specific input. If there is no input detected (as in your pics) or if you are switching b/w inputs you may see the effect.
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post #4 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HaRd2BeAr View Post

That does look rather bad, obviously hard to judge as the camera can make it look worse (or better).

Thanks Aaron. It actually looks better in these pictures than it does in real life

I have been reading some professional reviews, the few that I can find, and plan to try their calibration settings when I get home to see if it helps. Otherwise, I am going to go back to HHGregg and open up boxes and check them out before I go thru the hassle and get one just like this.

I could probably live with it, I just want to make sure that a "bad" lightbleed doesn't mean the TV is defective and prone to more issues down the road. These things aren't cheap...
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post #5 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 12:24 PM
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I dont find that acceptable but if your not distracted by it when using your set then its fine but personally I would expect a panel of that price range to have minimal or close to no bleeding.
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post #6 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 01:00 PM
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mine was real bad so i returned it
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post #7 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 05:35 PM
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Is your TV calibrated yet?? I do not think that is really bad unless it is already calibrated.

Once calibrated, I think you will see a difference.
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post #8 of 44 Old 04-30-2012, 07:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboys6190 View Post

Is your TV calibrated yet?? I do not think that is really bad unless it is already calibrated.

Once calibrated, I think you will see a difference.

What calibration settings do you recommend? It definitely is less noticeable when a movie is playing, but I would like to eliminate it or get rid of as much as possible.
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post #9 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 04:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfin3591 View Post

What calibration settings do you recommend? It definitely is less noticeable when a movie is playing, but I would like to eliminate it or get rid of as much as possible.


You can try the calibration settings from this site:

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.p...&id=1333359799


Plus I belive some owners posted their setting on pg 5, 8, & 16 in the LG7600 forum.
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post #10 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 05:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfin3591 View Post

Hi Guys,

I am new to the forum, and wanted to get some experienced insight as to what should be considered "acceptable" lightbleed/flashlighting. I have just purchased my first edge-lit LED-LCD 3D TV, and I went with the new LG 55LM7600. I have always been a fan of LG and have always had good luck with the quality and reliability of them.

However, my new TV has, what I would consider, alot of lightbleeding. I contacted LG Support and looked on their website under Q&A, and was told by an associate that this TV should not have lightbleeding. Now, I would assume that there will be some since this is a con for edge-lit TVs, but what should I accept as reasonable? I do not want to play the TV replacement game and take multiple TV's on and off the wall and back to the store, but I certainly do not want a bad looking TV after spending $1750 on it.

I have attached some pictures below. Please give me your input on whether or not my TV is beyond the acceptable lightbleed, especially if you have one of these models and can compare.

Thanks.

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed4.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed3.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed2.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed1.jpg

The no-signal screen dosent have local dimming enabled so always looks pretty bad - once you have a something playing like a blu ray and local dimming set it shouldnt look that bad,

What is it like with a blu ray movie - with the letterbox black bars - does the bleed/clouding still show in the black bars?
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post #11 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfin3591 View Post

Hi Guys,

I am new to the forum, and wanted to get some experienced insight as to what should be considered "acceptable" lightbleed/flashlighting. I have just purchased my first edge-lit LED-LCD 3D TV, and I went with the new LG 55LM7600. I have always been a fan of LG and have always had good luck with the quality and reliability of them.

However, my new TV has, what I would consider, alot of lightbleeding. I contacted LG Support and looked on their website under Q&A, and was told by an associate that this TV should not have lightbleeding. Now, I would assume that there will be some since this is a con for edge-lit TVs, but what should I accept as reasonable? I do not want to play the TV replacement game and take multiple TV's on and off the wall and back to the store, but I certainly do not want a bad looking TV after spending $1750 on it.

I have attached some pictures below. Please give me your input on whether or not my TV is beyond the acceptable lightbleed, especially if you have one of these models and can compare.

Thanks.

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed4.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed3.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed2.jpg
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...ightbleed1.jpg

how high is the backlight set? what is the highest value it can reach (to determine what % of max backlight you're using in those pics)?

if it looks that bad and backlight is 50% or lower, I'd say that level of flashlighting and clouding is not acceptable at all.
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post #12 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrb1972 View Post

The no-signal screen dosent have local dimming enabled so always looks pretty bad - once you have a something playing like a blu ray and local dimming set it shouldnt look that bad,

What is it like with a blu ray movie - with the letterbox black bars - does the bleed/clouding still show in the black bars?

good points worth checking
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post #13 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 05:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboys6190 View Post

You can try the calibration settings from this site:

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.p...&id=1333359799


Plus I belive some owners posted their setting on pg 5, 8, & 16 in the LG7600 forum.

Very good find on the review of this top notch TV. Especially of note is the included 2-Point white balance settings included in the Expert Mode. Of course, you may find you need to tweak these values if visible red, green, or blue tint is found on your TV. Easy to do with many calibration discs such as Disney WOW or AVS HD 709.

As for the light bleed. . . it looks unacceptable.
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post #14 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 06:07 PM
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I would think a higher contrast along with a lower backlight brightness might make a change for the better in regards to the light bleed. I'm new around here, so my suggestion is probably way off and should be taken with a grain of salt.
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post #15 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 06:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by weasel00 View Post

I would think a higher contrast along with a lower backlight brightness might make a change for the better in regards to the light bleed. I'm new around here, so my suggestion is probably way off and should be taken with a grain of salt.

Actually, for most TV that's about right. Especially for LCD panels it is good to set the back light as low as possible and still obtain good peak light output (Contrast) for your viewing conditions so you are right. Brightness should be set as well as the previous settings using a Media Assist Disc at the least and also set color levels. With a new TV the settings can sometimes be daunting, so patience and diligence helps. . . .
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post #16 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 06:49 PM
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Buy a plasma...only real way to solve flashlighting/clouding
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post #17 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 07:04 PM
 
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Not really. . . there are many great LED/LCD TVs.

But not helpful. There is always your alternative, along with sometimes floating black levels. . . having to run "slides" for break in, worry about image retention and burn in if certain imalges are left on the TV screen for too long. Kind of a pain to have to worry if wife or kids did the proper things before turning the TV off and such.

Each technology has it's foibles, so it's pointless to dwell on it.
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post #18 of 44 Old 05-01-2012, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

Especially of note is the included 2-Point white balance settings included in the Expert Mode. Of course, you may find you need to tweak these values if visible red, green, or blue tint is found on your TV. Easy to do with many calibration discs such as Disney WOW or AVS HD 709.

Disney WOW has no patterns for doing grayscale as it's meant for users who don't have calibration equipment. There are a few for evaluating grayscale but not actually making changes to the 2-pt controls found on most sets (and since you can't really evaluate grayscale by eye unless it is massively off, those patterns are not very helpful at determining anything beyond grayscale tracking linearity). What those patterns will help you do at best is select the color temp preset that is closest to neutral gray/white from the available options (roughly since most users may not know what D65 looks like exactly).
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post #19 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 06:38 AM
 
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Yes, but the AVS HD709 Media Assist Disc has gray scale and visible 2-Point, or even simple 1 point RGB, white balance can be optimized if it shows obvious tinting. It would be ludicrous to leave a TV display with an overall green tint to skin tones or red/purple casts to blue skies or golf greens or soccer fields.

The owner of a particular TV can observe and see if obvious tint is present in white balance. An owner can always restore the 2 point back to it's original settings. It can be and is a learning experience for a TV owner to learn the effects of the TV controls including 2 point white balance. And, many times just slight adjust to it will make noticeable improvement. Obviously D65 may be the ideal ( some say D55), but a TV owner certainly can make adjusts to white balance if it shows white purity tint.
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post #20 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 10:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

Yes, but the AVS HD709 Media Assist Disc has gray scale and visible 2-Point, or even simple 1 point RGB, white balance can be optimized if it shows obvious tinting. It would be ludicrous to leave a TV display with an overall green tint to skin tones or red/purple casts to blue skies or golf greens or soccer fields.

The owner of a particular TV can observe and see if obvious tint is present in white balance. An owner can always restore the 2 point back to it's original settings. It can be and is a learning experience for a TV owner to learn the effects of the TV controls including 2 point white balance. And, many times just slight adjust to it will make noticeable improvement. Obviously D65 may be the ideal ( some say D55), but a TV owner certainly can make adjusts to white balance if it shows white purity tint.

I suppose if doing so makes the image more watchable from a purely subjective viewpoint you can, but I wouldn't not confuse it with actual grayscale calibration (which is equipment based). And based on recent experiences with colorimeters, that equipment would have to be a spectro to make its use worthwhile. You could attempt making an optical comparator but making one that works properly would be difficult and expensive and still nowhere as effective as a spectro.
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post #21 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 11:00 AM
 
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Oh , well certainly there is no mention here of calling it "calibration" nor of calling it grayscale calibration. Even though it would result in a closer accuracy visually.
It is White Balance Correction and I made no such mention here of a "comparator" application. But there are several ways of comparator purity adjustment and all are really not expensive.
That is a generalization.

Plus, this is not the Display Cal thread and no need to turn to such details and then best dealt with there since it now is getting off topic of the OP.
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post #22 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

Oh , well certainly there is no mention here of calling it "calibration" nor of calling it grayscale calibration.
It is White Balance Correction and I made no such mention here of a "comparator" application. But there are several ways of comparator purity adjustment and all are really not expensive.

Plus, this is not the Display Cal thread and no need to turn to such details and then best dealt with there.

Yes I know but since calibration was brought up in this thread, I wanted to clarify. However, if you were to ask the experts in that forum about what goes into making a good optical comparator, I'm willing to bet it's not as simple or inexpensive as you might believe. In fact, I might ask that question myself since I'd like to know the exact and complete answer.
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Again. . . many things are brought up in a discussion of most threads and it now is going more off topic.

Plus, I have posted links to information regarding doing both optical comparison and even gamma correction and all it seemed to do is be fodder for argument or largely ignored. No one has to agree with such information, but there is a point where it becomes futile and argumentative. And, there are "experts" of many viewpoints. So. .. as I said. . . waaaay off topic once again.

Cheers and that is all.
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post #24 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 11:21 AM
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Fair enough, my main point in reply to your post below was that Disney WOW doesn't have any patterns meant for setting grayscale (by any method/equipment). It even goes as far as saying:

"If a monitor presents color shifts along the path of the grayscale,
it will require qualified service personnel with specialized instruments
to repair the issue. Do not attempt to open the monitor and
perform these adjustments yourself."

While these controls are in the user menus of many modern TVs, the point about qualified service personnel (aka Calibrators) and specialized instruments (most likely meters) can still be argued to be valid.

Let's leave it at that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

Very good find on the review of this top notch TV. Especially of note is the included 2-Point white balance settings included in the Expert Mode. Of course, you may find you need to tweak these values if visible red, green, or blue tint is found on your TV. Easy to do with many calibration discs such as Disney WOW or AVS HD 709.

As for the light bleed. . . it looks unacceptable.

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post #25 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 11:43 AM
 
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But, AVS HD709 (which was included in my post) does provide patterns where visual tint to white or gray can be detected.

And no one said anything about "opening the monitor" to make an adjustment. Quite an out of context example there. It's a "stretch" and ridiculous to say to an owner that something in the TVs user controls should not be touched. Or. . . "You better not touch that unless you have a meter (or two) or are a professional!" * * There is always default setting restore.


This seems to be an "ALL OR Nothing" stance folks who bought meters or paid for a calibration have. While most of us can agree that calibration would obtain the most accurate picture, those who advocate ONLY that seem to want to scare others into "no touching" of what is rightfully their choice.


While some want to stress that this is the AVS science forum, * surprise *, some people do not know or care about D65, saturation, lightness, etc and just want to get a decent and satisfying picture themselves and come here for simple advice. . . nothing more. Certainly, they can search and find many levels of expertise to satisfy their personal desire.


The point is, if White Balance is off enough to SEE colored tint use of the readily available USER R,G,B or 2 Point White Balance controls would result in better picture quality. If white does not look close to being white it is owner prerogative to make a correction. It is their TV and it is a learning experience to determine if he/she wishes to correct an off white condition. After all, as I said, things can be restored with picture reset.



Once again, off topic. . . so yes, let's leave it here.
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post #26 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

But, AVS HD709 (which was included in my post) does provide patterns where visual tint to white or gray can be detected.

And no one said anything about "opening the monitor" to make an adjustment. Quite an out of context example there. It's a "stretch" and ridiculous to say to an owner that something in the TVs user controls should not be touched. Or. . . "You better not touch that unless you have a meter (or two) or are a professional!" * * There is always default setting restore.

While some want to stress that this is the AVS science forum, * surprise *, some people do not know or care about D65, saturation, lightness, etc and just want to get a decent and satisfying picture themselves and come here for simple advice. . . nothing more. Certainly, they can search and find many levels of expertise to satisfy their personal desire.

This seems to be an "ALL OR Nothing" stance folks who bought meters or paid for a calibration have. While most of us can agree that calibration would obtain the most accurate picture, those who advocate ONLY that seem to want to scare others into "no touching" of what is rightfully their choice.

The point is, if White Balance is off enough to SEE colored tint use of the readily available USER R,G,B or 2 Point White Balance controls would result in better picture quality. If white does not look close to being white it is owner prerogative to make a correction. It is their TV and it is a learning experience to determine if he/she wishes to correct an off white condition. After all, as I said, things can be restored with picture reset.



Once again, off topic. . . so yes, let's leave it here.

let me just say this: just because you can do something doesn't mean you should... likewise just because certain settings are in the user menu doesn't mean you should play around with them

if some people don't care about D65, saturation, lightness, etc. then just disregard my posts... but others do and so I post what I do
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post #27 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 01:25 PM
 
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See folks. . .

Exactly what I was saying. . . ONLY certain people are allowed. LOL

Ok. . . for the rest of us remember.. . if you want to try all your USER settings. . . "don't ask don't tell".
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post #28 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 01:26 PM
 
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If a new TV owner learns a bit about the adjustments and setting capabilities of a new TV and notices white balance (white has some color tint to it) is off, it's ludicrous to say it should not be touched unless a meter or some other calibration equipment is used.
If whites obviously are not white but pinkish, greenish, or bluish corrections can be made to restore a closer semblance to displaying white balance.

The "All Or Nothing" view of making white balance corrections using a simple 1 point RGB or 2 Point High and Low adjustment is a bit ridiculous. Yes, D65 would be the ideal. But why not then say to ONLY adjust white balance if you have the "BEST" meter available? After all, a hobbyist grade $200 to $1,000 meter will not give you the accuracy of a $10,000 meter and associated equipment.

Example:

New TV Owner: Hi there, I'm really excited about my new TV and love it's features and over all picture quality. But even after making all the recommended and proper settings using AVS HD709 and consulting many times with the experts here, my TV picture has an overall green tint to ALL video sources.

Cal The Guru: Hmmm. . . it would seem that your TV white balance and gray scale are in need of adjustment. The ONLY way to take care of that is to buy a meter or have a professional calibration to D65.

New TV Owner:
I see. . . But I noticed there IS a setting for White Balance in the user control advanced settings. I'm thinking of using the AVS HD709 disc to make my own Media Assisted Setting and get some of the "green" tint out of the white. Can;t I do that?

Cal The Guru: NO. . . you should not touch that. You may make it worse and, anyway, you have no way of telling what D65 white point looks like. You need professional help.

New TV Owner: But I just want to get the white to look more, well. . . WHITE and not have the folks look like Martians when we watch NCIS. I really don't want spend extra money just to get a good picture on my TV.

Cal The Guru: Yes, that is too bad. But you should not touch those White Balance controls. It may L@@K better to you if you adjust them, but in fact will not attain the D65 standard. And if you do not set it to D65 all you colors will not be accurate and it will be bad for you.

New TV Owner: But how can it be bad or worse than it is now? ALL my COLORS now ARE tinted green???!!! I tried adjusting the 2 Point White Balance a bit and already it looks much better!

Cal The Guru: WHAT??!! You should put those controls back to where they were right NOW! They should NEVER be touched unless you have a meter or other PROPER equipment. You have NO idea if it really IS better. . . you could be viewing tainted colors!

New TV Owner: But it's my TV and the colors ARE already tainted green and with the AVS HD709 Media Assist Disc I think I can get it even better.

Cal The Guru: No. .. . I am sorry. You need to put those controls right back to where they were. It is your TV but those controls are only for experts or those who adhere to the absolutes of TV calibration. Not for you. . . sorry.

New TV Owner: Well, I guess, but even the TV in the store looked better than this. I guess I'll hit "Reset Picture" and just set the basics . . . and try and get used to sickly green people.

Cal The Guru: You're doing the right thing. It's D65 or nothing. That's the standard. Sorry. Pay up for a meter, spend hours learning how to calibrate, maybe buy another meter, or pay for a calibration.

New TV Owner: * sigh * . . . Who would think this would have to be so complicated

So to many new TV owners this is how it might go. They are understandably overwhelmed by all the new controls, but want to understand at least a little to get the TV out of "torch mode".
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post #29 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 01:28 PM
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This seems to be an "ALL OR Nothing" stance folks who bought meters or paid for a calibration have. While most of us can agree that calibration would obtain the most accurate picture, those who advocate ONLY that seem to want to scare others into "no touching" of what is rightfully their choice.


there is a reason for this and only those who have had the opportunity to have their DIY settings measured with a reference spectro (or even a affordable spectro) will understand why...

I thought my C6 was giving me great results up till the point a reference spectro proved otherwise... so ignorance can be bliss (just don't let a spectro anywhere near your display or that bubble will burst instantly)
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post #30 of 44 Old 05-02-2012, 01:35 PM
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If a new TV owner learns a bit about the adjustments and setting capabilities of a new TV and notices white balance (white has some color tint to it) is off, it's ludicrous to say it should not be touched unless a meter or some other calibration equipment is used.
If whites obviously are not white but pinkish, greenish, or bluish corrections can be made to restore a closer semblance to displaying white balance.

The "All Or Nothing" view of making white balance corrections using a simple 1 point RGB or 2 Point High and Low adjustment is a bit ridiculous. Yes, D65 would be the ideal. But why not then say to ONLY adjust white balance if you have the "BEST" meter available? After all, a hobbyist grade $200 to $1,000 meter will not give you the accuracy of a $10,000 meter and associated equipment.

Example:

New TV Owner: Hi there, I'm really excited about my new TV and love it's features and over all picture quality. But even after making all the recommended and proper settings using AVS HD709 and consulting many times with the experts here, my TV picture has an overall green tint to ALL video sources.

Cal The Guru: Hmmm. . . it would seem that your TV white balance and gray scale are in need of adjustment. The ONLY way to take care of that is to buy a meter or have a professional calibration to D65.

New TV Owner:
I see. . . But I noticed there IS a setting for White Balance in the user control advanced settings. I'm thinking of using the AVS HD709 disc to make my own Media Assisted Setting and get some of the "green" tint out of the white. Can;t I do that?

Cal The Guru: NO. . . you should not touch that. You may make it worse and, anyway, you have no way of telling what D65 white point looks like. You need professional help.

New TV Owner: But I just want to get the white to look more, well. . . WHITE and not have the folks look like Martians when we watch NCIS. I really don't want spend extra money just to get a good picture on my TV.

Cal The Guru: Yes, that is too bad. But you should not touch those White Balance controls. It may L@@K better to you if you adjust them, but in fact will not attain the D65 standard. And if you do not set it to D65 all you colors will not be accurate and it will be bad for you.

New TV Owner: But how can it be bad or worse than it is now? ALL my COLORS now ARE tinted green???!!! I tried adjusting the 2 Point White Balance a bit and already it looks much better!

Cal The Guru: WHAT??!! You should put those controls back to where they were right NOW! They should NEVER be touched unless you have a meter or other PROPER equipment. You have NO idea if it really IS better. . . you could be viewing tainted colors!

New TV Owner: But it's my TV and the colors ARE already tainted green and with the AVS HD709 Media Assist Disc I think I can get it even better.

Cal The Guru: No. .. . I am sorry. You need to put those controls right back to where they were. It is your TV but those controls are only for experts or those who adhere to the absolutes of TV calibration. Not for you. . . sorry.

New TV Owner: Well, I guess, but even the TV in the store looked better than this. I guess I'll hit "Reset Picture" and just set the basics . . . and try and get used to sickly green people.

Cal The Guru: You're doing the right thing. It's D65 or nothing. That's the standard. Sorry. Pay up for a meter, spend hours learning how to calibrate, maybe buy another meter, or pay for a calibration.

New TV Owner: * sigh * . . . Who would think this would have to be so complicated

believe me when I say I understand your point, but the reality is without a spectro trying to set grayscale properly is like trying to win the jackpot on a slot machine... as result, proper grayscale calibration is expensive to do correctly and might be out of reach for most TV owners not willing to spend hundreds on their own equipment/software or a pro

but those are the hard facts and no amount of wishful thinking can change them... I would also like to get the best PQ out of my TV without spending hundreds of $$$ but it's not really possible unless you have access to a spectro
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