Home Theater mag and .com review of the Sharp LC-90LE745U here, enjoy! !! - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-24-2012, 08:52 AM - Thread Starter
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Here is the review! Enjoy

http://www.hometheater.com/content/sharp-lc-90le745u-3d-lcd-hdtv


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3D Flat Panel Reviews
Sharp LC-90LE745U 3D LCD HDTV
By Thomas J. Norton • Posted: Aug 23, 2012

2D Performance
3D Performance
Features
Ergonomics
Value
Price: $11,000 At A Glance: Big, beautiful picture • Excellent setup controls • Serious 3D crosstalk

Editor's Note: It's with great pleasure that Home Theater brings you this exclusive first review of Sharp's new ground-breaking LC-90LE745U HDTV. With this 90-inch set, the first at its size truly intended for mass production, Sharp begins the era of projection-size flat panels suitable for any light environment. While the $10,000 (street) ticket price still exceeds the cost of a high quality 2D/3D projector and screen, as a sign of what's to come, it is a significant introduction. And, as you'll read in Tom Norton's detailed review, not a bad TV. - Rob Sabin

Ninety inches diagonal is not all that big as projection screens go. But Sharp’s new LC-90LE745U, at that same 90 inches, is immense by flat panel standards. With more than twice the screen area of a 65inch set, it has little flat panel competition for its size, and none at all for its combination of size and cost. Panasonic has an 85inch plasma, for example, that will set you back nearly twice as much. LG showed a 4K 80-inch LCD set at last January’s CES, but exact pricing and availability is still undetermined. Mitsubishi offers a 92-inch rear-projection set at some remarkable street prices (around $3,000), but its massive 194 pounds and 25-inch depth (225 pounds and 32 inches in its shipping carton) might be just a little intimidating.

One thing’s for certain. This Sharp can’t be ignored, either at the store or in your family room. Guests will gasp when they see it—even when it’s off. Your interior decorator will have a coronary. The kids will squeal with delight. And your charge card had better have a high limit. But for buyers who always wanted that really big HDTV but can’t accommodate a separate projector and screen, this could be a whole new ball game.

Big Features
It’s been an ice age since we last reviewed a Sharp-branded HDTV. We reported on the company’s Elite LCD HDTV this year (Home Theater, January 2012—review available at HomeTheater.com), but the LC-90LE745U varies in significant ways from both that design and Sharp’s other highend models. The most obvious difference, apart from size, is that it lacks the company’s much-touted Quattron (Quad Pixel) technology, which adds a yellow pixel to each red, green, and blue picture element. In my judgment, this omission is a plus.

In addition, unlike the Elite, this set is not a local-dimming design. But it does employ full LED backlighting (not edge lighting) with limited global dimming. As the source becomes darker, the backlighting gradually reduces to enhance the blacks. This global dimming is not defeatable.

The set comes with a full, printed manual, the remote is respectable though not backlit, and the screen finish is at least a bit less mirror-like—though hardly matte—than the current flat panel norm. That’s an important consideration with such a large piece of glass. In addition to the usual picture adjustments, the LC-90LE745U offers a full color management system (CMS) with hue, saturation, and value (luminance) controls for each of the primary (red, green, blue) and secondary (yellow, magenta, cyan) colors. There are also both two-level and (in some but not all AV Modes) 10-level white balance adjustments. Unfortunately, these two sets of white balance controls can only be used separately. I used the two-level mode for my calibrations.

There’s also a Motion Enhancement feature (two active modes plus off), Active Contrast (either on or off), Gamma Adjustment (five settings), Black Level (not applicable for HDMI, so not used for this review), and a Film Mode (Advanced, with steps from 0 to 10, Standard, and off—the Standard setting is not available with 1080p sources). The native refresh rate is 120 hertz, but if you select the AquaMotion240 Motion Enhancement mode, the backlight cycles on and off to produce an effect similar to a native 240-Hz refresh rate. The set uses 3:2 pulldown to convert 1080p/24 3D sources to 1080p/60.

According to the manual, the Advanced Film mode simply reduces film judder. In fact, in some settings of this mode what you’ll see looks very much like the infamous soap-opera effect produced by motion interpolation—even when the separate Motion Interpolation control is turned off (or is not available, and it isn’t in 3D). The only way to completely eliminate this effect is to turn off Motion Interpolation and place the Film Mode in either Standard (if available), Advanced (0), or off. Off will produce artifacts with interlaced sources, so your best option may be the Advanced (0) setting. Interestingly, however, on some 3D material I actually preferred the slight smoothing effect with the Advanced Film mode in its lowest active setting, +1 (the settings range from 0 to +10).

The set’s Active Contrast control is not as sophisticated as the Intelligent Variable Contrast on Sharp’s Elite sets. The latter takes the nature of each scene into account. The LC-90LE745U’s Active Contrast improved some scenes but degraded others. I left it off.

There’s the usual variety of 3D controls for altering image depth, a 2D-to-3D conversion mode (modestly effective), and a control for adjusting the conversion mode’s effect. The set comes with two pair of rechargeable 3D active glasses. Extras are $60. The glasses’ power switch has two active positions, 3D and 2D—the latter may be useful to viewers who choose not to watch in 3D while others do. The IR transmitter that activates the glasses is built into the set.

The Sharp’s audio was more than tolerable. With a little bass and treble boost (+1 to +2 decibels), the Bass Enhancer turned on, and the so-called 3D Surround and Clear Voice settings turned off, it was downright pleasant. That’s because the set is deep enough, particularly in its bottom 5 inches or so, to accommodate reasonably sized speakers. We’re not talking room-shaking bass here, but there’s enough warmth to avoid the bright and scratchy sound that makes most flat panel sets barely listenable. The width of the Sharp also makes a reasonable degree of real stereo possible. I don’t want to go overboard about the set’s sound; a modest pair of bookshelf speakers and perhaps a subwoofer, driven by a budget A/V receiver for a basic 2.1 system, will sound better and play considerably louder (the Sharp’s own maximum sound level is modest). But if you want to put your resources into a big HDTV first and save up for adding that audio system later, you won’t be punished for the choice.


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3D Flat Panel Reviews
Sharp LC-90LE745U 3D LCD HDTV Page 2

As with virtually all of today’s sets, the Sharp can play photos, videos, and music either from a USB memory device or a computer. Sharp’s SmartCentral Internet feature can also connect you to the Web over your home network for surfing or linking to one of the free or subscription services accessible directly from Sharp’s onscreen menu. You can also update the set’s software from the Internet over your home network, either wired or wirelessly, or from a USB memory device.

2D Performance
The Sharp sailed through all of our standard video processing tests without a hitch. But this was true of 1080i and 480i material (the 2:2, 3:2, MA HD, and SD tests) only when the Film Mode was set to Advanced or Standard.

Awesome was the word that came to mind when I first laid eyes on the Sharp. There’s no question that such a big, bright image, viewed from 10 feet away, definitely grabs your eyeballs. But that knock-me-out impression wasn’t from its size alone. The picture itself could be dazzling with the right source. Fleshtones looked real. Well-lit and -photographed green foliage, after a proper calibration, looked correct rather than Crayola toned. While the color with the widest deviation from technical accuracy after adjustment was red (see HT Labs Measures), it never looked visibly wrong.

With some material I did feel that the picture was a little less achingly crisp than with a comparably priced projector and screen (or even one of the better, considerably less expensive choices, such as JVC’s $3,500 DLA-X30). But such a conclusion would be dicey at best without a carefully controlled, side-by-side comparison. Baraka, still one of the best-looking HD discs available, gave no hint of less than topnotch resolution. Nor did The Art of Flight, another stunning transfer. Both discs looked amazing from start to finish. At just a hair under 14 foot-lamberts, the picture was more than bright enough—and there was additional upside range still available on the Backlight control (and the Contrast control as well) for more brightness.

But two issues kept the Sharp from earning a perfect score. The most obvious, and expected, was its off-axis performance. The colors at the extreme side of the screen fade noticeably if your seat is near the opposite edge. But the problem was less pronounced than I expected, and most viewers are unlikely to be bothered by it if they are seated at least 10 feet from the screen. The closer you sit, the more pronounced your angular position to the screen becomes, and the more obvious the fading. The money seat, however, and the best overall picture, is still at the center.

The second issue is black level and shadow detail. Yes, the Sharp’s measured black level is outstanding—among the best we’ve ever recorded (see HT Labs Measures). On a full black screen, the corners are slightly lighter than in the center, though not enough to be obvious or distracting. This backlit set’s black uniformity is far better than we’ve seen from any edge-lit design.

But because of the global dimming of the set’s LED backlighting, even a small, bright area intruding onto an otherwise black screen (such as the pause bug on a Blu-ray player) increases the overall black level. The measured increase is small, but the visible increase is obvious. Because of this, very dark, low-contrast scenes don’t fare particularly well. I doubt if any video display can do full justice to the darkest scenes in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, but there are others currently available that can do better on them than this Sharp. These include Sharp’s own Elites and the new Panasonic plasmas (see our review of the Panasonic TC-P65VT50 in this issue). So also can a few affordable projectors. To be fair, the Elites and Panasonics have far smaller screens, and to achieve the best blacks with a projector, you must view it in a completely darkened room.

On less than the very darkest scenes, particularly scenes with a few bright highlights set off against dark backgrounds (more typical of dark scenes than the black-to-dark-gray brightness range in the torture scenes mentioned above), the Sharp’s performance is comfortable, though not trend setting. I’d love to see this set with full local dimming, but that would likely increase the price considerably. Still, a 90-inch Elite…

3D Performance
The resolution, color, and depth the Sharp can generate in 3D are all first-rate and often mind-blowing. Toy Story 3 looked absolutely amazing, with a riotous blend of vivid color and densely packed detail. Avatar, Despicable Me, Tron, and Tangled were, in their own ways, just as jaw dropping.

A big contributor to this performance is the Sharp’s 3D brightness. I achieved a comfortable peak level of approximately 10 ft-L. That might not sound like much, but it was almost as satisfying as I’ve seen in a first-rate, dual-projector IMAX theater. Not once did I find the image too dim. And there was still backlight and contrast range to spare—though not as much as in 2D. For me, the 3D champ remains Sharp’s Elite, but that model cannot equal the immersion of this set’s huge screen.

The set’s 3D black level looked even better than in 2D. There aren’t many 3D movies with severely challenging dark scenes (filmmakers must realize that such scenes just won’t work in the average dim 3D theatrical presentation), but Tron is probably the closest. While I’ve seen deeper blacks and better contrast from this movie on a few other displays, it worked convincingly for me on the Sharp—as did the night jungle scenes in Avatar.

But while at first I was blown away by the Sharp’s 3D performance, I soon noticed a significant problem: the worst 3D crosstalk (ghosting) I’ve yet seen. All of the above-mentioned titles were affected by it to one degree or another—Tangled the most, Tron the least. Experimenting with the various 3D controls did nothing to eliminate or minimize it on native 3D material, but turning the Convert Effect control down to its minimum setting (+1) reduced it significantly in the 2D-to-3D conversion mode.

The crosstalk issue was so serious that I suspected something was wrong. I contacted Sharp, and they advised me that this was an early sample fault. Sharp engineers were still working on the problem as we went to press but promised a second sample soon. Check back later for any updates. In the meantime, if you’re considering this set, be sure to check closely for this problem, before purchase, with one or more of the previously mentioned discs—or others.

Conclusions
Yes, the off-axis concerns remain, but that’s a generic issue with all LCD sets to one degree or another. And if you want state-of-the-art black level and shadow detail (not just measured, but visible), this may not be your display. Furthermore, short of a fix for the crosstalk, fans of 3D might want to look elsewhere. But even with these caveats, there’s no denying that the Sharp LC90LE745U provides something rare indeed in today’s flat-panel market: a true projection-size home theater experience, without the projector.
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-24-2012, 12:20 PM - Thread Starter
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No comments on the review I am surprised with as many people who are interested in it.
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-24-2012, 03:17 PM
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Nice review! I hope the 3D is better than what they saw. Although I wonder if it is as bad a reviewer makes it seem compared to Joe6pack.
I took the wife to see the 65vt50, 70 elite, 80 and 90 so she could see what they looked like at 18ft. Of course the 90 was best size for distance, she was most impressed by the picture quality of the elite. The 90 looked very good though and was easily my pick (shes leaving it up to me) due to the 18ft viewing distance we will have. The 80 looked a little snowy/fuzzy? and the panny looked a little dim and weak in color. We where at the magnolia store and I would not make a decision only based on what they showed me because I know they can manipulate the conditions and settings. As to the 90, they said that it was calibrated and I liked it a lot (the wife liked it plenty also). I thought the viewing angles where very good. Maybe I don't know what is bad but I got on the florr and leanded over at about 5ft in front of it and off to side about 4ft over abd 5ft in front and didn't see any difference from being in front of it. We watch our 60" grand wega in vivid, so I had him put in an animation (pictar?) and switch to dynamic and we liked it better, especialy the wife, she likes the colors to pop. The picture looked sharp at all distances with the toon and the wildlife show with crocydiles (very detailed) that was showing when we entered. This will be my pick unless something elses shows up in the next month or so (4K maybe or 80" to 90" elite). If you haven't seen this, go see it for yourself, it's worth the trip. Sorry for the rant.smile.gif
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post #4 of 9 Old 08-25-2012, 09:29 PM - Thread Starter
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Glad you enjoyed the review.
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post #5 of 9 Old 08-26-2012, 10:29 PM - Thread Starter
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post #6 of 9 Old 08-26-2012, 11:12 PM
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Thank you for the review biggrin.gif
Very interesting, I hope the crosstalk was fix by sharp mad.gif
Does anyone have experience with 3D material with the lc-90le745? Any comment on that matter could be instructive.
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post #7 of 9 Old 08-27-2012, 08:42 AM - Thread Starter
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I have seen that term used many times now, (cross talk) but I am not able to see what it means anywhere can someone explain it please?
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post #8 of 9 Old 08-27-2012, 01:30 PM
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With this TV see what our brain thinks is 3D by useing active glasses to show one image to the left eye and one image to the right eye alteranting. Whe one eye sees part of the opposing image, it looks like a ghosting around said image wich is what is reffered to as cross-talk Hope this helps:)
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-27-2012, 01:32 PM
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you might be better off posting this in the actual owners thread
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