Do LCD/LEDs have a break in period? Do they degrade with time? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 06:32 AM - Thread Starter
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Do they change or warm up or break in after so much time? If I perform calibration on day 1 should I check it x weeks later?

Does the screen degrade or change after so many years?


Thanks!
Kevin
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post #2 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevreh View Post

Do they change or warm up or break in after so much time? If I perform calibration on day 1 should I check it x weeks later?

Does the screen degrade or change after so many years?


Thanks!
Kevin

Yes, all electronics have shifting points depends on temperature rise in operation.
Calibration are always done after few hrs warm-up.
New electronics needs at least 24+ hrs /days continuous break-in to settle down.
LCD pixels/backlight/optic layers also needs break-in/settle down with/after regulary many hours use, PQ will improve mostly with time and when the material reach end of life, PQ will degrade and break-down.

Try this break-in to quick setlle down the LCD:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1406663/pixel-jogger-break-in-improves-pq-plasma-lcd-led-tv-for-diy-users-only-w-disclaimer
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post #3 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 07:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by iBrad View Post

Yes, all electronics have shifting points depends on temperature rise in operation.
Calibration are always done after few hrs warm-up.
New electronics needs at least 24+ hrs /days continuous break-in to settle down.
LCD pixels/backlight/optic layers also needs break-in/setlle down after regulary many hours use, PQ will improve mostly with time and when the material reach end of life, PQ will degrade and break-down.

Try this break-in to quick setlle down the LCD:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1406663/pixel-jogger-break-in-improves-pq-plasma-lcd-led-tv-for-diy-users-only-w-disclaimer

Thanks for that link, iBrad. Some of those claims though...hmm. Gave me a chuckle. ("Try it yourself, let the video play a few hours (see post #19) and see it yourself, you will notice it directly!.....PictureQuality comes to Life in your face! Testproof it yourself now!......AMAZING overall (3D like) PictureQuality improvements in....")

But I'll take a look and report back. Thanks!
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post #4 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by kevreh View Post

Thanks for that link, iBrad. Some of those claims though...hmm. Gave me a chuckle. ("Try it yourself, let the video play a few hours (see post #19) and see it yourself, you will notice it directly!.....PictureQuality comes to Life in your face! Testproof it yourself now!......AMAZING overall (3D like) PictureQuality improvements in....")

But I'll take a look and report back. Thanks!

You're welcome.
I'm an AV perfectionist and DIY researcher, have electronics degree, worked years in the av/pc/laptop industry as QA/R&D/repair engineer.
You will only notice the differences if you are visual accurate, else it'll be a waste of time for ppl with bad vision.
Here are the new links for 10minute pixel jogger and 60fps versions:

Pixel Jogger is the BEST pixel picture optimizer, break-in HD PQ solution/enhancer ever created!
http://youtu.be/7kxu-chASGg 10min
http://youtu.be/RhV_kfjEZb0 60fps 10min
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_S-zDy9-_Lg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOfEwdDhjo0

fix dead stuck improve pixels PQ on Plasma LCD LED tv monitors etc.
keep playing repeat on for hours, check after few hrs, if problem is gone/fixed, else keep playing!
Download HD:
Pixel Jogger 30fps 10min.mp4
http://www.sendspace.com/file/nypxl6
Pixel Jogger 60fps 10min.mp4
http://www.sendspace.com/file/59unmj
a) Pixel Jogger.mp4 - 352 KB
http://www.mediafire.com/?hq5rv78qu1d9dhd
b) Pixel Jogger plus PinkNoise.mp4 - 2 MB
http://www.mediafire.com/?3i79g9u6rop4zd1
c) WhitescreenIR.mp4 - 1 MB
http://www.mediafire.com/?evee88qfnxarphi
Regular (outdated RGB versions) Download HD:
http://www.mediafire.com/?vo7x0d0dyvy5xdj
PixelOptimizer1920.mp4
http://www.mediafire.com/?81scr3r9r4z58un
PixelburninSmooth1920.mp4
---
By simply displaying alternate Black and White screens in 30fps (= max NTSC screen 60Hz refresh rate), the PLASMA/LCD/LED pixels gets the CORRECT even/proper aging/intensive break-in/warm-up! All RGB Pixels will simply switches ON/OFF in 60Hz, this will jog/warm-up the pixels to switch faster and even.
Try it yourself, let the video play a few 4+ hours on repeat and see it yourself, you will notice it directly!
PictureQuality comes to Life in your face! Testproof it yourself now!. (and also see the real differences between properly break-in/warmed-up PLASMA/LCD/LED displays)
AMAZING overall (3D like) PictureQuality improvements in:
1) Higher Contrast/Deeper Black Level.
2) Sharper/Higher Details Resolution.
3) Vibrant lifelike Colors (if your WhiteBalance is properly calibrated).
4) Faster/smoother/clearer movements etc..

Enjoy!
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post #5 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 12:00 PM
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Let's try a different approach.

1) Don't calibrate on day one. Enough might change that you ought to wait a bit. You want to do a crude, quick calibration of brightness, contrast, base color? Sure, do that. You'll enjoy the first 100 or so hours more. But in a few weeks, revisit the settings and don't spend much time on it initially.

2) Watch some TV for a while. That's all you need to "break it in." No really it is. If you want to check for dead pixels, then some full-screen single color images are useful. Check those out. Otherwise, watch some TV.

3) Your TV will lose brightness over time. But it's a lot of time. You likely won't care by the time this happens. Something else could fail before it does.

If you want to use PixelJogger, I can't see how it will hurt. But I can't really see why it's necessary either.
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There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #6 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 12:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Let's try a different approach.

1) Don't calibrate on day one. Enough might change that you ought to wait a bit. You want to do a crude, quick calibration of brightness, contrast, base color? Sure, do that. You'll enjoy the first 100 or so hours more. But in a few weeks, revisit the settings and don't spend much time on it initially.

2) Watch some TV for a while. That's all you need to "break it in." No really it is. If you want to check for dead pixels, then some full-screen single color images are useful. Check those out. Otherwise, watch some TV.

3) Your TV will lose brightness over time. But it's a lot of time. You likely won't care by the time this happens. Something else could fail before it does.

If you want to use PixelJogger, I can't see how it will hurt. But I can't really see why it's necessary either.


Thanks, sounds similar to plasma.
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post #7 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iBrad View Post


By simply displaying alternate Black and White screens in 30fps (= max NTSC screen 60Hz refresh rate), the PLASMA/LCD/LED pixels gets the CORRECT even/proper aging/intensive break-in/warm-up! All RGB Pixels will simply switches ON/OFF in 60Hz, this will jog/warm-up the pixels to switch faster and even.
Try it yourself, let the video play a few 4+ hours on repeat and see it yourself, you will notice it directly!
PictureQuality comes to Life in your face! Testproof it yourself now!. (and also see the real differences between properly break-in/warmed-up PLASMA/LCD/LED displays)
AMAZING overall (3D like) PictureQuality improvements in:
1) Higher Contrast/Deeper Black Level.
2) Sharper/Higher Details Resolution.
3) Vibrant lifelike Colors (if your WhiteBalance is properly calibrated).
4) Faster/smoother/clearer movements etc..


I seriously doubt the validity of those claims. Sounds scientifically implausible.
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post #8 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 04:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevreh View Post

Do they change or warm up or break in after so much time? If I perform calibration on day 1 should I check it x weeks later?

Does the screen degrade or change after so many years?


Thanks!
Kevin

as far as a break period is concerned, the real answer is not really... but if you do calibrate on day one, a touch-up after 100-150 hours of use or so wouldn't hurt
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post #9 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

I seriously doubt the validity of those claims. Sounds scientifically implausible.

You should read that as personal subjective observation and is dependent on the person's perception ability.

Comparable with it as a coldstarted tube amplifier sound with a warmed up and breaked-in tube amp.
Both "warm" sounds will be different subjectively hearable depends on the person's hearing/reception's ability and very difficult/impossible to measure with freq. analyzers, what exactly sound subtility changed.
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post #10 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 05:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iBrad View Post

You should read that as personal subjective observation and is dependent on the person's perception ability.

I read that as "not based on scientific principles". The only way to experience a PQ improvement from a 'pixel jogger' would be the placebo effect.

I'm not trying to be rude, just stating that it's scientifically impossible for a 'pixel jogger' to provide any PQ improvements (and this has been discussed in the display calibration forum before, just use search to see what I mean).
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post #11 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 05:41 PM
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post #12 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 05:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

I read that as "not based on scientific principles". The only way to experience a PQ improvement from a 'pixel jogger' would be the placebo effect.

I'm not trying to be rude, just stating that it's scientifically impossible for a 'pixel jogger' to provide any PQ improvements (and this has been discussed in the display calibration forum before, just use search to see what I mean).

Yes, subjective discussed it without testproof it personally, so who cares.
People who actually test it did see improvement in sharper images and less ir, whether it's placebo and not scientific theoretical bs is not important, it works for those ppl.
Thats all!
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post #13 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iBrad View Post

Yes, subjective discussed it without testproof it personally, so who cares.
People who actually test it did see improvement in sharper images and less ir, whether it's placebo and not scientific theoretical bs is not important, it works for those ppl.
Thats all!
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post #14 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 06:17 PM
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LCD's can also degrade over time. For example, my lcd had a perfect picture when i first bought it with no flashlights, clouds and only 1 or 2 stuck pixels. However after 1.5 years flashlights began to appear. Now i have major flashlighting in all 4 corners. Still no clouding and the pixels are no longer stuck (and zero dead pixels) after 4 years, but the flashlighting alone destroys my enjoyment of the tv for now.
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post #15 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by NuSoardGraphite View Post

LCD's can also degrade over time. For example, my lcd had a perfect picture when i first bought it with no flashlights, clouds and only 1 or 2 stuck pixels. However after 1.5 years flashlights began to appear. Now i have major flashlighting in all 4 corners. Still no clouding and the pixels are no longer stuck (and zero dead pixels) after 4 years, but the flashlighting alone destroys my enjoyment of the tv for now.

Yes, all material will degrade/deform overtime.
That 4 corners flashlighting is caused by contant pressure of too tightend screws in the backcover/lcd frame.
You can fix it by loosen up the screws in those corners, so the pressure will decrease and overtime hopefully minimize/fix that flashlighting.

Loosen the screws up in the backcover and/or inside the lcd mounting frame, is a proven fix/method posted somewhere here or on net.
http://www.mademan.com/mm/how-repair-flashlighting-lcd-television.html#vply=0

Combined with massaging the screen is also a solution:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1125227/possible-permanent-backlight-bleed-fix-for-lcd-tvs-and-monitors-w-disclaimer/0_50
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post #16 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 11:54 PM
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Originally Posted by iBrad View Post

People who actually test it did see improvement in sharper images and less ir, whether it's placebo and not scientific theoretical bs is not important, it works for those ppl. Thats all!

Oh, my mistake then. I thought this was the Audio Visual Science Forum, not the snake oil forum.
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post #17 of 40 Old 02-06-2013, 11:59 PM
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So yes, the misalignment of the light guides or the edge lighting is what causes flashlighting. And, yes, sometimes loosening (or tightening) the assembly can cause the pieces to fall into proper alignment and ameliorate this problem. In fact, It's probably true that a semi-skilled technician could align the relatively small number of parts in a typical LCD to improve any flashlighting on almost any TV that has some.

That said, the "massage the screen" idea has always been done and should continue to be ignored. It might actually work because pressing on all the component from the screen side could achieve the intended result. But pressing on the actually LCD screen is dumb, likely to cause damage, and a terrible, terrible way to fix a problem that exists between a light bar that is not even located behind the screen (it's next to it) and a plastic light guide that is located behind the screen. It'd be like repairing a damage liver by performing surgery on your stomach.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #18 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 12:33 AM
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Oh, my mistake then. I thought this was the Audio Visual Science Forum, not the snake oil forum.

What, there is no measuring/programmed instrument that can compare to human eye subtle perception and ability of preference.
Who set the ref.point of better image? The individual human eye, get over it!

If you can find the right very sensitive measuring instrument, that is able to measure the subtle i.e. sharpness improvement/variation, good luck with it.

As mentioned about i.e. the tube amp, audiophile won't listen to it, without proper warming-up the amp!
And is there a measuring instrument able to measure the variation in audio quality perception, besides the individual human ear and their preference? Don't think so.

Your preference could be not the same as others, you don't like/believe pixel jogger, so be it, do we care, NO.
Enjoy!
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post #19 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 06:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iBrad View Post

What, there is no measuring/programmed instrument that can compare to human eye subtle perception and ability of preference.
Who set the ref.point of better image? The individual human eye, get over it!

If you can find the right very sensitive measuring instrument, that is able to measure the subtle i.e. sharpness improvement/variation, good luck with it.

As mentioned about i.e. the tube amp, audiophile won't listen to it, without proper warming-up the amp!
And is there a measuring instrument able to measure the variation in audio quality perception, besides the individual human ear and their preference? Don't think so.

Your preference could be not the same as others, you don't like/believe pixel jogger, so be it, do we care, NO.
Enjoy!

iBrad,


I'm intrigued and a little humored by your claims. Just want to add a few things.... while I understand your point about tube amps its probably not a good comparison because they're so different then lcds. Apples and oranges.

Next, I don't know if your drinking your own bathwater, or perhaps on to something. Considering that your making claims that find disagreement amongst many people, with some supporting testimonials from a few others, tells me that in order to back your claims you need a little more of a scientific and methodical approach. Why don't you take a few different lcds or plasmas, abuse them, then repair them with your videos. Also, if they improve image quality, you can setup a camera on a tripod with fixed settings and show us a before and after. I know its not cheap or easy to acquire these sample tvs.

But unless you do this you'll continue to be accused of being a snake oil salesman. Understand that this is a normal process of people not just believing everything the see or read.

Good luck with your endeavors....


Kevin
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post #20 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 07:05 AM
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Thier is no LED pixel! LED is the back lighting and you do not have to handle it like a plasma!
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post #21 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 07:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevreh View Post

iBrad,


I'm intrigued and a little humored by your claims. Just want to add a few things.... while I understand your point about tube amps its probably not a good comparison because they're so different then lcds. Apples and oranges.

Next, I don't know if your drinking your own bathwater, or perhaps on to something. Considering that your making claims that find disagreement amongst many people, with some supporting testimonials from a few others, tells me that in order to back your claims you need a little more of a scientific and methodical approach. Why don't you take a few different lcds or plasmas, abuse them, then repair them with your videos. Also, if they improve image quality, you can setup a camera on a tripod with fixed settings and show us a before and after. I know its not cheap or easy to acquire these sample tvs.

But unless you do this you'll continue to be accused of being a snake oil salesman. Understand that this is a normal process of people not just believing everything the see or read.

Good luck with your endeavors....


Kevin

Nah, don't bother with it, as I'm not a manufacturer, can't invest into something to prove some DIY improvements/hobby projects, just take it or leave it.
My test samples are TV'S: PANASONIC P42S30, SAMSUNG UE40EH6030, SHARP LC26GA3E, SAMSUNG 244T, ACER AL1931.
LAPTOP'S (their displays): ACER ASPIRE 8930G, ACER TRAVELMATE 8104, MEDION PentiumIII notebook.

The comparation with tube amp is both are electronics and all electronics: tubes, leds, chips, resistor, transistors, capacitors etc. all have its own lifetime characteristics and optimum range or optimum performance in after usage in time/temperature swing/duration/life cycle etc.
So after some time in usage of stressing periode, electronics stabilize the performance/saturation point and from time will degrade to end of lifecycle.

Pixel jogger just aid quickly and efficiently into this aging/stressing/stabilizing process to reach the optimum performance point.
BTW. Electronics are always (stress)tested/aging at least few hrs/(high-range electronics 24+ hrs), before leaving the factory, go figure.

Enjoy!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevreh View Post

Do they change or warm up or break in after so much time? If I perform calibration on day 1 should I check it x weeks later?

Does the screen degrade or change after so many years?


Thanks!
Kevin


In reference to the original question. It depends on the technology used in a particular TV. Break-in seems to be more related to plasma panels than LCD. That said, after buying 8 different LCD TVs over that past 5 years or so, I do know that the light output level changes as does warm up time on CCFL and EEFL back lit LCD panels. This may also alter lamp color temperature somewhat, but probably not to a high degree. Either way, after about 200 hours of initial use of an LCD TV with florescent back light, some minor changes in picture may be noticed. The bigger issue is warm up time after the TV has 2,000+ hours on it or so. In some tests a few of us AVS memebers did on CCFL/EEFL back lit LCD TVs it was noted that it took sometimes over 90-100 minutes for the florescent lights brightness to reach 95% maximum light output at any setting it was used at.

Now that most LCD panels are lit with LEDs (LED TV is a misnomer), it is a game changer as to both warm up time and degradation of light output over years. Since LEDs do not seem to exhibit much appreciable "warm up" to produce maximum light output. As far as aging vs. degradation goes with LEDs, it is hard to say. There is some evidence for both of these concerns according to a few sources. And I am sure there are others. These links speak of LED light intensity and later about possible aging characteristics.

http://www.inphora.com/LED_intensity.pdf


http://luminousdiy.com/Technical%20Info.htm
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post #23 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 09:17 AM
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post #24 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

That said, the "massage the screen" idea has always been done and should continue to be ignored. It might actually work because pressing on all the component from the screen side could achieve the intended result. But pressing on the actually LCD screen is dumb, likely to cause damage, and a terrible, terrible way to fix a problem that exists between a light bar that is not even located behind the screen (it's next to it) and a plastic light guide that is located behind the screen. It'd be like repairing a damage liver by performing surgery on your stomach.

A important point for anyone considering this 'technique'. The last thing you want to do to any LCD screen is put significant pressure on it.
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post #25 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by 6athome View Post

Thier is no LED pixel! LED is the back lighting and you do not have to handle it like a plasma!

I blame marketing for this confusion (Samsung is the first brand that comes to mind). There is no such thing as a LED TV at the moment, just LCD TVs with LED backlights. Now when OLED comes out, it will be a different story.
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post #26 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 10:17 AM
 
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It is important to note that any "expert reference" articles regarding warm up times, etc that are a few years old may not apply to current LED back lighted LCD panels.

Regarding my post about "Warm Up Time" here is an excerpt from a thread from May of 2012 and when a few of us were checking warm of times to maximum light output on an LG xxLD550 series LCD TV with EEFL ( a type of CCFL florescent):

Max output after 105 minutes to 3 hours stabilized is 270 lux +/- 2 lux.

Output after specified time:

100 lux @ 3 min. 37%
193 lux @ 15 min 71%
235 lux @ 30 min 87%
251 lux @ 45 min 92%
261 lux @ 60 min 96%
267 lux @ 90 min 98.8%
270 lux @ 105 min 100%

The Back Light output was stable at 270 +/- 2 lux after 105 minutes and monitored for 4 hours total. So in my opinion, from now on, I wouldn't do any setting adjusts on my TV until it was on at least 60 minutes or better still 105 minutes. And, as you can see, it takes an additional 60 minutes to gain the last 8% in light output to max output. I will say that after 45 minutes to 1 hour I really can not tell visually, any "brighter" or better picture with either excellent OTA content or Blu-ray reference movie content.
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post #27 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Phase700B 


In reference to the original question. It depends on the technology used in a particular TV. Break-in seems to be more related to plasma panels than LCD. That said, after buying 8 different LCD TVs over that past 5 years or so, I do know that the light output level changes as does warm up time on CCFL and EEFL back lit LCD panels. This may also alter lamp color temperature somewhat, but probably not to a high degree. Either way, after about 200 hours of initial use of an LCD TV with florescent back light, some minor changes in picture may be noticed. The bigger issue is warm up time after the TV has 2,000+ hours on it or so. In some tests a few of us AVS memebers did on CCFL/EEFL back lit LCD TVs it was noted that it took sometimes over 90-100 minutes for the florescent lights brightness to reach 95% maximum light output at any setting it was used at.

Now that most LCD panels are lit with LEDs (LED TV is a misnomer), it is a game changer as to both warm up time and degradation of light output over years. Since LEDs do not seem to exhibit much appreciable "warm up" to produce maximum light output. As far as aging vs. degradation goes with LEDs, it is hard to say. There is some evidence for both of these concerns according to a few sources. And I am sure there are others. These links speak of LED light intensity and later about possible aging characteristics.

http://www.inphora.com/LED_intensity.pdf


http://luminousdiy.com/Technical%20Info.htm

There is a < LED longterm performance? > sticky in the Calibration Forum, have fun smile.gif
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1278372/led-longterm-performance
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post #28 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 11:19 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

It is important to note that any "expert reference" articles regarding warm up times, etc that are a few years old may not apply to current LED back lighted LCD panels.

Regarding my post about "Warm Up Time" here is an excerpt from a thread from May of 2012 and when a few of us were checking warm of times to maximum light output on an LG xxLD550 series LCD TV with EEFL ( a type of CCFL florescent):

Max output after 105 minutes to 3 hours stabilized is 270 lux +/- 2 lux.

Output after specified time:

100 lux @ 3 min. 37%
193 lux @ 15 min 71%
235 lux @ 30 min 87%
251 lux @ 45 min 92%
261 lux @ 60 min 96%
267 lux @ 90 min 98.8%
270 lux @ 105 min 100%

The Back Light output was stable at 270 +/- 2 lux after 105 minutes and monitored for 4 hours total. So in my opinion, from now on, I wouldn't do any setting adjusts on my TV until it was on at least 60 minutes or better still 105 minutes. And, as you can see, it takes an additional 60 minutes to gain the last 8% in light output to max output. I will say that after 45 minutes to 1 hour I really can not tell visually, any "brighter" or better picture with either excellent OTA content or Blu-ray reference movie content.


confused.gif Good to know. But to what degree does that apply to other LCDs??? I wonder how unique the output:time curve would be for each brand and model. But this explains issues with calibration, either someone calibrates it after the lcd is on for 10 minutes then it looks different in two hours, and the other way around.

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Originally Posted by Phase700B View Post

I will say that after 45 minutes to 1 hour I really can not tell visually, any "brighter" or better picture with either excellent OTA content or Blu-ray reference movie content.

Wonder if thats because your eyes just adjusted to the brightness level?
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post #29 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

A important point for anyone considering this 'technique'. The last thing you want to do to any LCD screen is put significant pressure on it.

I recommended that thread be closed and ignored for a long time. Then I gave up.

If people want to risk destroying their TVs, I can't stop them.

If they want to carefully loosen a few screws (not too far!) to try to mitigate a problem... I can -- in that case -- help them understand why that might help a bit, while encouraging caution.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #30 of 40 Old 02-07-2013, 11:41 AM
 
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confused.gif
Wonder if thats because your eyes just adjusted to the brightness level?

From what I've read in some other articles your eye can not tell a change in light output of much less than 10%. . . unless you are comparing a direct A-B comparison side by side. A gradual increase from the 92% to 100% maximum light output of the LCD TVs we were testing could not be discerned.

As far as light output curves regarding "other LCDs", I assume you mean LED back lit LCDs and the light output apparently is dependent also on the type and even brand of LEDs used as the light source. Which is another head shaker. Already we have panel lottery issues. What if there are light source LED issues too? One never knows how vendor sources may change from one run of TV production to another I guess. For instance. . . there really is no "white LED". Originally, LEDs came in red, yellow, green and then blue. From what I remember reading in some tech articles, they obtained white light from an LED by doping the substrate with a combination of materials from each color category to try and blend it and obtain a white light. So, what if one batch or one maker of LEDs is slightly different? That could shift the color temperature of the LED itself. Maybe another reason why TVs of the same brand/model but different make dates have differing characteristics? Dizzying amount of variables.

And, it raises the question if the LEDs will maintain the same color temperature of white light throughout their lifetime. My guess. . . probably not. But to what extent are we to worry about it. It would be nice to just . . .. set it and forget it. . . . wouldn't it? wink.gif
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