Catching a Glimpse of Dolby's HDR TV Technology - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 10:02 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 5,559
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1039 Post(s)
Liked: 2185
My first glimpse at Dolby’s new HDR display technology did not disappoint. The new technology allows for a much greater native contrast ratio and maximum brightness than is achievable with conventional displays. In fact, the dynamic range of the display is so wide that my camera was not able to capture all of it, and even if it could a normal display would not be able to replicate the effect.

From what I’ve seen already, it’s a very welcome and significant advancement in display technology. In fact, the added contrast has the effect of making 2D content look much more three-dimensional. I'm looking forward to seeing more of the technology today and tomorrow, I will update this post when that happens. For now I'll just say this: it looks fantastic and it is a legitimate advancement in display technology.


On the left, a reference-quality conventional monitor. On the right, a display using Dolby's new HDR technology.

It's impossible to see the advantage of Dolby's HDR technology using a regular monitor. In the picture above, it just looks brighter. Nevertheless, in reality it looks better—not brighter.

Find out more about Mark Henninger at www.imagicdigital.com
imagic is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 10:14 AM
wse
AVS Special Member
 
wse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 6,494
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 236 Post(s)
Liked: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

My first glimpse at Dolby’s new HDR display technology did not disappoint. The new technology allows for a much greater native contrast ratio and maximum brightness than is achievable with conventional displays. In fact, the dynamic range of the display is so wide that my camera was not able to capture all of it, and even if it could a normal display would not be able to replicate the effect.

From what I’ve seen already, it’s a very welcome and significant advancement in display technology. In fact, the added contrast has the effect of making 2D content look much more three-dimensional. I'm looking forward to seeing more of the technology today and tomorrow, I will update this post when that happens. For now I'll just say this: it looks fantastic and it is a legitimate advancement in display technology.


On the left, a reference-quality conventional monitor. On the right, a display using Dolby's new HDR technology.

It's impossible to see the advantage of Dolby's HDR technology using a regular monitor. In the picture above, it just looks brighter. Nevertheless, in reality it looks better—not brighter.

Very interesting better than Darbee?

wse is offline  
post #3 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 10:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
fierce_gt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,611
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 423 Post(s)
Liked: 747
i'll be keeping my eye on this, because of all the 'advancements'(oled, uhd, glasses free 3d), this is the ONLY one that might make me replace my projector eventually.

Displays: Samsung PN64F8500/JVC X35
AVR: Pioneer VSX-1018AH, 5.1 audio
Sources: HTPC(Mediabrowser), PS3, XBOX360, Wii, Sony DVP-CX995V
Control: Harmony One
fierce_gt is online now  
post #4 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 11:51 AM
Advanced Member
 
Do-It-Yourself's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: In a house far away from you creeps (hopefully)
Posts: 900
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 23
I'm really interested in seeing an unbias review.
It seems like two different displays are used, the latter seems like a larger display.
And of course, without doubt, they will try to make the first one look worse as possible compared to the other.

It's like looking at an under exposed image and an over exposed image.
Citivas likes this.
Do-It-Yourself is offline  
post #5 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 12:53 PM
AVS Special Member
 
fierce_gt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,611
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 423 Post(s)
Liked: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

I just saw a demo of the new LCD panel vs. A ZT60 and it does come surprisingly close, but it cannot match the best plasma around. It probably would match a lesser plasmas IQ.

can you elaborate? I would think this HDR would be better in many ways than a zt60. so I can only assume it's the black levels that fall short on the HDR? or are you seeing issues with motion, off-axis viewing, ??

there's some things that are 'terrible' about lcd's that I never notice, and others (like clouding) I can't see passed. so I'm curious in what areas the HDR unit still struggles, thanks
evil_attorney likes this.

Displays: Samsung PN64F8500/JVC X35
AVR: Pioneer VSX-1018AH, 5.1 audio
Sources: HTPC(Mediabrowser), PS3, XBOX360, Wii, Sony DVP-CX995V
Control: Harmony One
fierce_gt is online now  
post #6 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 12:58 PM
Senior Member
 
jiujitsu35's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: miami
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Did you see the new vizio reference display?
jiujitsu35 is offline  
post #7 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 01:03 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 5,559
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1039 Post(s)
Liked: 2185
Quote:
Originally Posted by fierce_gt View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

I just saw a demo of the new LCD panel vs. A ZT60 and it does come surprisingly close, but it cannot match the best plasma around. It probably would match a lesser plasmas IQ.

can you elaborate? I would think this HDR would be better in many ways than a zt60. so I can only assume it's the black levels that fall short on the HDR? or are you seeing issues with motion, off-axis viewing, ??

there's some things that are 'terrible' about lcd's that I never notice, and others (like clouding) I can't see passed. so I'm curious in what areas the HDR unit still struggles, thanks


Posted in the wrong thread, sorry. Mobile woes.

Find out more about Mark Henninger at www.imagicdigital.com
imagic is online now  
post #8 of 42 Old 01-07-2014, 04:46 PM
Newbie
 
saronian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I saw this demonstrated by Brightside Technologies in 2006 and it was amazing. Dolby Labs bought Brightside in 2007 and we are finally seeing the results.
saronian is offline  
post #9 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 05:41 AM
Advanced Member
 
nathanddrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 900
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 64
What's with the HDR obsession? It's not realistic and certainly not always better.
nathanddrews is online now  
post #10 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 06:31 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Citivas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 223 Post(s)
Liked: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do-It-Yourself View Post

I'm really interested in seeing an unbias review.
It seems like two different displays are used, the latter seems like a larger display.
And of course, without doubt, they will try to make the first one look worse as possible compared to the other.

It's like looking at an under exposed image and an over exposed image.

Reminds me of the way Monster used to have in-store demos of the supposed improved picture quality that came from using their cables until someone working at one of the stores managed to post pictures of the connections and showed they were using composite cables (not even HD capable) versus their HDMI for the comparison. After that circulated on the web those demo kiosks seemed to disappear, though the scummy company still persists…

Still, I look forward to seeing some controlled and measured comparisons down the road.
Citivas is offline  
post #11 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 07:04 AM
Advanced Member
 
bluewhale1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 702
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Is it just the Reference series that has the Dolby HDR?
bluewhale1 is offline  
post #12 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 07:26 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 5,559
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1039 Post(s)
Liked: 2185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Citivas View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Do-It-Yourself View Post

I'm really interested in seeing an unbias review.
It seems like two different displays are used, the latter seems like a larger display.
And of course, without doubt, they will try to make the first one look worse as possible compared to the other.

It's like looking at an under exposed image and an over exposed image.

Reminds me of the way Monster used to have in-store demos of the supposed improved picture quality that came from using their cables until someone working at one of the stores managed to post pictures of the connections and showed they were using composite cables (not even HD capable) versus their HDMI for the comparison. After that circulated on the web those demo kiosks seemed to disappear, though the scummy company still persists…

Still, I look forward to seeing some controlled and measured comparisons down the road.

This in not even on the same planet as that. The benefit of Dolby Vision is immediately apparent, and measurable.

Find out more about Mark Henninger at www.imagicdigital.com
imagic is online now  
post #13 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 08:06 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Citivas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 223 Post(s)
Liked: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

This in not even on the same planet as that. The benefit of Dolby Vision is immediately apparent, and measurable.

It WILL be measurable. But are they providing access to sets for people to do that right now? That was the point -- a controlled kiosk demo is not a measurable result. And how can you say it was immediately apparent when there was not an apples-to-apples basis for the visual comparison?

I'm in no way suggesting it won't be great. Just dismissing a controlled demo at a marketing event as the basis for judging it.
Citivas is offline  
post #14 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 09:13 AM
AVS Special Member
 
mo949's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 375
pictures definitely won't do this one justice it seems. The second picture just looks like it has a ton of white crush killing loads of detail in the source image.
mo949 is offline  
post #15 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 09:46 AM
Senior Member
 
Utopianemo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 313
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 35
There is no way to do an apples-to-apples comparison because they are not both apples. Comparing HDR to current display protocol is very much like comparing a very nice picture of the sky to a very nice plasma displaying a picture of the sky. The picture has much in the way of gradation but no inherent light.
Utopianemo is offline  
post #16 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 11:12 AM
Senior Member
 
reallynotnick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 462
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanddrews View Post

What's with the HDR obsession? It's not realistic and certainly not always better.

This is not the same thing as HDR photography, this actually displays a wider range of brightness that is more like real life. Think of it this way, you can't stare at the sun in real life but you can in a movie, therefore the movie isn't realistic. Now, of course we don't really want movies to be THAT bright for obvious reasons, but being closer to reality will make a great improvement.
reallynotnick is offline  
post #17 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 12:10 PM
Newbie
 
tyurek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I'm all for having greater dynamic range and contrast in a picture. After all, the benefit is universally acknowledged in still photography. The same is true for any video footage that targets eye candy like TV commercials or documentaries/news/sports where you want the picture to be as real life as possible. But I'm not too sure about movies. Doesn't the "movie mode"/"cinema gamma" in most TVs produce reduced contrast and more subtle colors to give that artistic "movie" feeling? I hope HDR doesn't conflict with artistic vision in such applications. I guess there will always be the option of turning off if one doesn't like it.
tyurek is offline  
post #18 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 12:11 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Citivas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 2,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 223 Post(s)
Liked: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by reallynotnick View Post

This is not the same thing as HDR photography, this actually displays a wider range of brightness that is more like real life. Think of it this way, you can't stare at the sun in real life but you can in a movie, therefore the movie isn't realistic. Now, of course we don't really want movies to be THAT bright for obvious reasons, but being closer to reality will make a great improvement.

The way you describe it does not make it sound that appealing, actually, for my next TV. I don't want "reality," I want something that comes as close as possible to what I would see in a good theater. That's why my top set has remained a plasma until now. That's why "edge enhancement" features on LCD's and some plasmas look hideous to me. That's why so many movie-goers absolutely hated the first Hobbit in 48fps when it came out and why they did serious post-production to the second film to reign in the effect of "too realistic" a picture. Filmmakers have long understood that people don't want to see reality -- they ant to see an artistic representation of it, that plays with light, shadow and subtlety. Perhaps not for sports, but that's not what I'm using my set for.

Again, I haven't seen the tech in practice myself yet so I may love it -- just reacting to what you described.
Citivas is offline  
post #19 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 01:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
mo949's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 375
when watching a movie with low ambient light (like a cinema), the SMPTE standards actually result in a lower brightness than all displays are already capable of.

however a brighter tv for sunday football at that time in the afternoon when the sun seeps in through every nook and cranny doesn't sound so bad to me wink.gif

oh, and as far as the pics at the top, I might be crazy, but the image on the left looks like the one I want to see in the evening.
mo949 is offline  
post #20 of 42 Old 01-08-2014, 08:15 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 5,559
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1039 Post(s)
Liked: 2185
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

when watching a movie with low ambient light (like a cinema), the SMPTE standards actually result in a lower brightness than all displays are already capable of.

however a brighter tv for sunday football at that time in the afternoon when the sun seeps in through every nook and cranny doesn't sound so bad to me wink.gif

oh, and as far as the pics at the top, I might be crazy, but the image on the left looks like the one I want to see in the evening.

A photo cannot convey what the new display can do because digital photos do not have enough range to capture what these new displays can show. It's a technology you have to see with your own eyes to understand and appreciate. 

rogo likes this.

Find out more about Mark Henninger at www.imagicdigital.com
imagic is online now  
post #21 of 42 Old 01-09-2014, 12:18 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
rogo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Sequoia, CA
Posts: 30,113
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Liked: 465
So IMO, the Sharp/Dolby/Oblivion demo did not at all always look better. Quite hardly. On several of the space clips, it noticeably raised the black level.

The set was a prototype and it was quite possibly a wreck settings-wise, but I am very skeptical of this tech.

In terms of demos, Sony's equivalent blew it away on the show floor. Like night-and-day, not even close blew it away.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
rogo is offline  
post #22 of 42 Old 01-09-2014, 03:33 AM
Member
 
dabotsonline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 24
1. Am I right in saying that this Dolby HDR technology is coming to market as 'Dolby Vision', and that the only TV including it so far is the 120" Vizio Reference series LCD ( http://www.avsforum.com/t/1510706/vizio-120-reference-series-uhdtv-at-ces-2014 )?
2. How does Dolby Vision compare to Technicolor's HDR technology ( http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind-screen/ces-technicolor-taking-dolby-vision-669171 )?
3. Will it be possible for Dolby Vision or Technicolor HDR to ever be used with OLED?
4. Will it be possible for the Dolby, Sisvel and IZON glasses-free 3D technologies to ever be used with OLED?
5. Will it be possible for Dolby Vision or Technicolor HDR to ever be used in conjunction with the Dolby, Sisvel and IZON glasses-free 3D technologies, in either LCD or OLED?
dabotsonline is offline  
post #23 of 42 Old 01-09-2014, 07:21 AM
Advanced Member
 
bluewhale1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 702
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dabotsonline View Post

1. Am I right in saying that this Dolby HDR technology is coming to market as 'Dolby Vision', and that the only TV including it so far is the 120" Vizio Reference series LCD ( http://www.avsforum.com/t/1510706/vizio-120-reference-series-uhdtv-at-ces-2014 )?
2. How does Dolby Vision compare to Technicolor's HDR technology ( http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind-screen/ces-technicolor-taking-dolby-vision-669171 )?
3. Will it be possible for Dolby Vision or Technicolor HDR to ever be used with OLED?
4. Will it be possible for the Dolby, Sisvel and IZON glasses-free 3D technologies to ever be used with OLED?
5. Will it be possible for Dolby Vision or Technicolor HDR to ever be used in conjunction with the Dolby, Sisvel and IZON glasses-free 3D technologies, in either LCD or OLED?

Would also like to see the answer first question. I thought I read somewhere that the Dolby HDR is in all models of the Reference and P series.(Cant seem to find it now)
Can anyone confirm with Vizio?
bluewhale1 is offline  
post #24 of 42 Old 01-09-2014, 07:47 AM
Advanced Member
 
RLBURNSIDE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 753
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by reallynotnick View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanddrews View Post

What's with the HDR obsession? It's not realistic and certainly not always better.

This is not the same thing as HDR photography, this actually displays a wider range of brightness that is more like real life. Think of it this way, you can't stare at the sun in real life but you can in a movie, therefore the movie isn't realistic. Now, of course we don't really want movies to be THAT bright for obvious reasons, but being closer to reality will make a great improvement.

You can put a limited for the overall gamma in any given frame to not burn your eyes out. Small highlights and so on SHOULD be a million times more bright than the darker parts of the image, or even the average gamma that the picture shows. You can have HDR that also has built-in dynamic sunglasses (limiters) to protect your eyes.

I'm sure they will release commercial displays with that, otherwise they'd get sued if some kids got their retinas burned by staring at the sun too long.
RLBURNSIDE is offline  
post #25 of 42 Old 01-09-2014, 09:12 AM
AVS Special Member
 
mo949's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

So IMO, the Sharp/Dolby/Oblivion demo did not at all always look better. Quite hardly. On several of the space clips, it noticeably raised the black level.

The set was a prototype and it was quite possibly a wreck settings-wise, but I am very skeptical of this tech.

In terms of demos, Sony's equivalent blew it away on the show floor. Like night-and-day, not even close blew it away.

I'm open minded to improvements, but observations like this concern me. At night when watching my films on my current panasonic plasma the only thing that would make me a bit happier is to have the black levels be a bit lower - if the brightness was any higher than I already have it, I'd feel the eye strain; not something you want to do after looking at monitors and the blackberry all day. Hopefully they aren't counting on eye strain to help float their blacks.

I'm curious about the Sony demo you mentioned, is there a link to something about it here?


thanks for your impressions.
mo949 is offline  
post #26 of 42 Old 01-09-2014, 10:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Scott Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 1,135
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 193 Post(s)
Liked: 854
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

I'm curious about the Sony demo you mentioned, is there a link to something about it here?

Yep, here it is.


Scott Wilkinson
AVS Editor
Scott Wilkinson is online now  
post #27 of 42 Old 01-10-2014, 05:58 PM
AVS Special Member
 
DanLW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,331
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Citivas View Post

The way you describe it does not make it sound that appealing, actually, for my next TV. I don't want "reality," I want something that comes as close as possible to what I would see in a good theater. That's why my top set has remained a plasma until now. That's why "edge enhancement" features on LCD's and some plasmas look hideous to me. That's why so many movie-goers absolutely hated the first Hobbit in 48fps when it came out and why they did serious post-production to the second film to reign in the effect of "too realistic" a picture. Filmmakers have long understood that people don't want to see reality -- they ant to see an artistic representation of it, that plays with light, shadow and subtlety. Perhaps not for sports, but that's not what I'm using my set for.

Again, I haven't seen the tech in practice myself yet so I may love it -- just reacting to what you described.

I want something better than what I see in a good theater. A good theater has required ambient light levels, and bass that goes down to just 20Hz if you're lucky. I'm all for more realistic movies for the same reason PC gamers spend thosands of dollars buying hardware that enable advanced graphics settings that make games look more realistic.

I'll bet this same argument was levied by film critics when sound was introduced... and color... and cinemascope... and stereo... and surround sound... If there's a problem with high frame rates, it's that it is very unforgiving in that it reveals movie sets for what they are - movie sets that were created quickly and inexpensively. And it is very unforgiving on VFX, in that CGI needs to now be even better to hide the fact that it is CGI.

I think HDR, however, will be less of a jarring advance than HFR. It's a new standard that will require new displays and updated theaters with better projection. Perhaps theaters in the future will forego projection altogether. If they can create HDR displays with no bezel that can be calibrated so that they all look exactly the same, perhaps the theater of the future will be made up multiple display panels. Or if they could print an OLED display on a flexible medium large enough for a theater screen, perhaps that is the future of theaters. Imagine a theater that looks as good as a plasma/OLED!

And imagine an ignorant theater owner that leaves it in "torch mode"!
DanLW is offline  
post #28 of 42 Old 01-10-2014, 11:25 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 5,559
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1039 Post(s)
Liked: 2185
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

So IMO, the Sharp/Dolby/Oblivion demo did not at all always look better. Quite hardly. On several of the space clips, it noticeably raised the black level.

The set was a prototype and it was quite possibly a wreck settings-wise, but I am very skeptical of this tech.

In terms of demos, Sony's equivalent blew it away on the show floor. Like night-and-day, not even close blew it away.

Yeah but Vizio used Dolby Vision in its Reference Series and I'd say those panels looked as good as the Sony X-tended Dynamic Range ones, so the technology itself clearly works when implemented properly.

 

I don't know what was up with the Dolby Vision demo, there were definitely issues with the blacks levels being way too high in some scenes, even more so with The Great Gatsby than with Oblivion.


Find out more about Mark Henninger at www.imagicdigital.com
imagic is online now  
post #29 of 42 Old 01-11-2014, 01:15 AM
AVS Special Member
 
mo949's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 375
If rogo didn't mention a non 3d set as being as good, then it just isn't as good .

It's like saying if Mark didn't praise a Visio, then it wasn't worth praising wink.gif

J/k
mo949 is offline  
post #30 of 42 Old 01-16-2014, 09:51 PM
AVS Special Member
 
fafrd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 3,262
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by dabotsonline View Post

1. Am I right in saying that this Dolby HDR technology is coming to market as 'Dolby Vision', and that the only TV including it so far is the 120" Vizio Reference series LCD ( http://www.avsforum.com/t/1510706/vizio-120-reference-series-uhdtv-at-ces-2014 )?
2. How does Dolby Vision compare to Technicolor's HDR technology ( http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind-screen/ces-technicolor-taking-dolby-vision-669171 )?
3. Will it be possible for Dolby Vision or Technicolor HDR to ever be used with OLED?
4. Will it be possible for the Dolby, Sisvel and IZON glasses-free 3D technologies to ever be used with OLED?
5. Will it be possible for Dolby Vision or Technicolor HDR to ever be used in conjunction with the Dolby, Sisvel and IZON glasses-free 3D technologies, in either LCD or OLED?

So does this mean that Dolby Vision and this HDR standard that Technicolor is working on with Sony (and also possibly Samsung) are going to be competing standards going after the same thing???

-fafrd
fafrd is online now  
Reply LCD Flat Panel Displays

Tags
Ces 2014

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off