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post #1 of 36 Old 05-27-2014, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Note: This article is posted in the LCD Flat Panel Displays forum because the technology I describe here will most likely be implemented in LCD TVs initially, though it can theoretically be applied to other types of displays.

 

I recently attended a webinar hosted by SMPTE (Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers) and presented by Scott Miller, a senior member of the research staff at Dolby Laboratories. The title was "A Perceptual EOTF for Extended Dynamic Range Imagery," which is a cornerstone of Dolby's work on high-dynamic-range (HDR) display technology under the name Dolby Vision. This is a subject I'm very interested in, since it promises far greater improvements in overall picture quality than the increased pixel density of Ultra HD.

 

Days of Future Past

For those who are unfamiliar with the term, EOTF stands for "electro-optical transfer function," which determines how an optical display, such as a TV or projector, responds to an incoming electrical signal—specifically, it describes how to convert digital code into visible light. Amazingly, there is no EOTF defined in any of the standards used today—not even Rec.2020, the standard likely to be used for UHD.

 

Rec.601 (SD), 709 (HD), and 2020 define an OETF (opto-electrical transfer function), which is determines how light entering a camera is converted to an electrical signal. This OETF is more or less based on the inherent EOTF of CRT (cathode-ray tube) displays, the display technology that completely dominated the field for most of the last 60 years.

 

As you may know, CRTs use red, green, and blue phosphors that glow when bombarded by electrons; the more electrons that hit the phosphor material, the brighter it glows. The relationship between the intensity of the electron beam—which is controlled by the electrical video signal—and the intensity of the light emitted by the phosphor is determined by the phosphor itself, and it follows a curve we call gamma.

 

Because CRTs exhibit a fixed-gamma EOTF, video cameras have needed to use an inverse OETF so that transitions from black to white on a TV appears linear. Thus the current standards define an OETF under the assumption that the images will be shown on a gamma-based display. (Actually, the camera OETF is often adjusted for artistic intent; the Rec.709 OETF is rarely used in practice.) That worked fine when virtually all TVs were CRTs, and as flat panels and projectors were developed, they implemented a gamma-based EOTF because that's what the whole television system is based on.

 

In this graph, the blue curve is the natural response of CRT phosphors to different levels in the input signal; it is the CRT's EOTF. The red curve is the gamma-correcting OETF used by cameras to compensate for CRT's gamma. The result is a linear increase in luminance as the input level rises.

 

Amazingly, the CRT-derived gamma EOTF was finally standardized in Rec.1886—in 2011! However, now that we are on the verge of a brand-new television system, it might be time to abandon the gamma EOTF—after all, flat panels and projectors are not limited to it, so why not create a new EOTF that offers better image quality? Gamma works okay at relatively low light levels and narrow dynamic range, but HDR displays could well have much higher light output, so a new EOTF based on human perception rather than the limitations of a particular display technology is the best solution.

 

A New Hope

To study human perception and preferences, Dolby set up a 2K digital-cinema projector firing onto a 21" (diagonal) monochrome LCD panel, which served as a rear-projection screen and operated in unison with the projector using dual modulation. The result was a very high-contrast display that was also capable of very high peak brightness—up to 20,000 candelas/m2 (cd/m2), a unit of measure commonly called "nits." By contrast, reference monitors for the current television standard are typically specified at a peak light level of 100 nits, though many TVs can reach several hundred nits. On the dark end of the scale, the test system could reach 0.004 nits or 0.001 foot-lamberts, which is pretty good, though the very best consumer TVs can reach more than ten times lower.

 

In Dolby's viewer-preference study, an NEC 2K digital-cinema projector fired onto a 21" monochrome LCD panel, resulting in a very high-contrast display that was also capable of very high peak brightness. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

Viewers were seated at three screen heights from the screen in a dark-room environment and were shown three carefully selected sets of images: one set for examining black levels, one set for examining diffuse white levels, and a third set for examining highlight levels. For the black-level images, viewers were shown the same image sequentially at two different luminance levels and then asked to choose which one they liked better. Based on their choice, two more images were shown and they chose again. The process was repeated until they converged at their preferred level for that image. The same procedure was used for the diffuse white-level images.

 

For the highlight images, an average picture level was pre-selected based on the previous results for diffuse white preferences. The viewer was given a knob to turn that adjusted only the highlight portions of the image, leaving the rest of the image the same, blending the crossover region between the highlights and the rest of the image so no artifacts would appear and confuse the results.

 

Dolby's preference study clearly indicates that people prefer darker blacks and higher peak luminance than standard TVs and even Dolby's experimental Pulsar TV can produce. Notice that the Sharp Elite PRO-60X5FS extends from below 0.01 nit to 1000 nits, well beyond most current TVs; too bad it's no longer available. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

Based on the preference-study results, Dolby settled on a dynamic range from 0 to 10,000 nits. You might think that 10,000 nits would be painful to look at, but it's not—that's the typical brightness of a fluorescent tube, which can be viewed without pain even in an indoor environment. Dolby also decided that a practical system should be limited to 10-12 bits due to current infrastructure and silicon constraints.

 

Revenge of the Nerds

Dolby then looked at a well-established graph called the Barten Ramp, which is based on a model derived by Peter Barten from studies of human visual perception. It reveals where most people start seeing the difference between the luminance of two sequential digital code words at different brightness levels expressed as the percentage that difference represents compared with the brightness level.

 

For example, consider a 10-bit 2.4 gamma digital value that corresponds to a luminance of 100 nits; the next higher digital value yields a luminance of 100.23 nits. The absolute change in luminance is 0.23 nits, but the step as a percentage of luminance is 0.23/100, or 0.23%. Next consider the digital value that corresponds to 0.102 nits; the next higher digital value yields 0.106 nits. The absolute change in luminance is 0.004 nits, but the step as a percentage is 0.004/0.102, or 3.3%. As the luminance decreases, the difference between digital values as a percentage of the luminance increases, and we see those steps more easily.

 

This is pretty complicated, but it results in curves (often called "DeltaL/L" curves) that meaningfully represent the way our eyes interpret what we see. According to Scott Miller, "When we look at shadows, our vision adapts downward, so we can make out all the minute details hidden in the darkness. When we look at things that are brightly lit, our vision adapts upward, so we can again perceive the subtle details in bright objects without being blinded by the flood of photons coming from them." This adaptation is represented in the Barten Ramp, which is one type of DeltaL/L curve.

 

Based on large numbers of test subjects, the Barten Ramp depicts the boundary above which most people start seeing the effect of minimum luminance steps, which manifests as banding in gradual gradations on the screen. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

Using a 10-bit 2.4 gamma curve, images with light levels below 10 nits can exhibit slight banding, and the peak light level is limited to 100 nits. A 15-bit gamma curve is required to eliminate banding at all brightness levels and to reach a peak light level of 10,000 nits, but many of those bits are wasted in the bright regions. (16-bit OpenEXR is a floating-point EOTF that is not used in consumer displays.) The gamma curves in this graph are straight diagonal lines because the graph's axes are logarithmic. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

A 13-bit log-based EOTF avoids banding at all brightness levels, but it wastes bits in the dark regions. The log curve is a straight horizontal line because the graph's axes are logarithmic. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

Barten came up with a very complex equation to describe the human contrast-sensitivity function—that is, how sensitive humans are to contrast under various conditions. Dolby used that equation to derive the just-noticeable differences in brightness steps at all peak light levels and ended up with its own equation that describes a 12-bit EOTF—which Dolby calls the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ)—that extends from 0 to 10,000 nits

 

Dolby's PQ EOTF uses 12 bits efficiently to track just below the Barten Ramp so that there is no visible banding at any brightness level from 0 to 10,000 nits without wasting bits. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

Source Code

The last part of the webinar illustrated how different ranges of luminance values are allocated in a gamma-based display and a PQ-based display. In the graphs below, the allocation of luminance values (code words) are shown for different peak light levels.

 

A gamma-based system allocates very few luminance values (code words) to shadow detail and progressively fewer values to the brightness of most typical objects and whites as the peak brightness increases. In this graph, each cylinder represents a different peak light level (500 nits, 1000 nits, etc.), increasing from right to left, with a gamma of 2.4. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

In a PQ-based display, more values are allocated to shadow detail at all peak light levels, and the range of values allocated to typical objects and whites remains more constant as the peak brightness increases. In this graph, each cylinder represents a different peak light level (500 nits, 1000 nits, etc.), increasing from right to left. (Courtesy of Dolby Laboratories)

 

According to Miller, "We have a rare opportunity to create a new video system from a blank slate, and Dolby approached it by asking, if we could reproduce whatever range of luminance we wanted, what would it be? Not just for next year's TVs, but for future TVs. Our research led us to a dynamic range up to 10,000 nits, which would need to fit into a reasonable number of bits." Once Dolby discovered it could be done, that led directly to PQ, an encoding scheme that follows the nature of human vision. Of course, in order to take advantage of PQ in an HDR display, the content must be prepared or "graded" accordingly, which means the studios must get on board as well.

 

A Dolby Vision-enabled HDR display using PQ instead of gamma presents a much more lifelike, realistic image than any current gamma-based display—as long as the content is graded for it. The picture here is only a simulation comparing a conventional display with a Dolby Vision display; true HDR cannot be shown on any current monitors.

 

I'm quite excited by the prospect of abandoning an outdated, obsolete EOTF in favor of something like Dolby PQ as part of a high-dynamic-range technology such as Dolby Vision. The company has obviously done its homework, and the demos I've seen of Dolby Vision-enabled HDR displays with appropriately graded content have been absolutely jaw dropping. I look forward to the day that this technology is implemented in displays and content that consumers can buy.

 

Many thanks to SMPTE and Scott Miller of Dolby for this outstanding webinar, and to Scott Miller and Josh Gershman of Dolby for their help with this article.

 

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post #2 of 36 Old 05-27-2014, 01:43 PM
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Thank you for the excellently detailed article. From the current 100 nit grading to 10,000 nit color grading would be a giant leap that must take a brand like Dolby to pull off.
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Excellent write-up, Scott.

 

By chance, were there any further updates on the number of companies implementing this on the content creation, content delivery, and display manufacturer fronts?

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post #4 of 36 Old 05-27-2014, 02:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post
 

Excellent write-up, Scott.

 

By chance, were there any further updates on the number of companies implementing this on the content creation, content delivery, and display manufacturer fronts?


Thanks for the kind words! As for updates, I have none beyond what we already know: Vizio Reference series, Sharp CES demo, TCL CES demo, FilmLight post-production tools. I'll ask Dolby if there's any more news on this front.


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post #5 of 36 Old 05-27-2014, 02:41 PM
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Thanks again Scott for a very informative yet somewhat complex post. Unlike some here, I am not usually THIS technically inclined, however I did understand the overall concept.

PS. How about you just let us know what display you will be getting in the future when all the dust settles and I'll certainly take your advice. :-)

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post #6 of 36 Old 05-27-2014, 04:06 PM
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Now we are getting somewhere! smile.gif

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No disrespect, Scott, but is it just me or is this the exact same knowledge Dolby have been telling us since just before CES 2014?

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No disrespect, Scott, but is it just me or is this the exact same knowledge Dolby have been telling us since just before CES 2014?


Yes, this is what Dolby has been talking about since then and even before. I thought that a thorough explanation of this difficult subject would be interesting to AVS readers.


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post #9 of 36 Old 05-27-2014, 06:32 PM
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Thank you for the confirmation, Scott. I was reading it using my tiny Blackberry screen with the pics disabled. Now that I'm home and see all the graphs, I agree, this is more helpful than the previous write-ups of the technology.

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Thank you  Scott On the article

But the price of the screen  Vizio RS120 65"  :confused:  

 

what with 3D and Dolby Vision-enabled HDR display  :confused:

 

Is Dolby working on their own screen  No other manufacturer  :confused:   (With all manufacturers do not understand if they also produce independent screen )

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Will HDR require more electricity usage?

I know some jurisdictions like California have electricity usage limits for TVs.

Are any TV manufacturers considering using HDR?
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Are any TV manufacturers considering using HDR?

http://www.toshiba.com/us/press-release/100945

 

L9400U Series  Released 06/14  with 12 bit   4:2:2

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This is Mensa Level HT Discussion - zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz! wink.gif

Wake us when our eyes can simply audition and buy a Consumer HDR panel. The Charts may mean something to ISFer's and other Mensa Techs but dang feel like a Tard without simply seeing HDR. Charts = potential or sets a bar whereas end product our eyes provide PROOF of what and the importance of HDR and without seeing I can't believe/perceive.

Sort of like reading a spec sheet to determine PQ versus an audition with what makes my eyes/mind go WoW!

Bottom line is Dolby and Vizio, et al - needs to quit talking and puffing Reference HDR and start PRODUCING otherwise the discussion is meaningless. If they've been working on this for several years where the hell is it and they can't even give us dates of production otherwise it's Trade Show B.S.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ops1567 View Post

http://www.toshiba.com/us/press-release/100945

L9400U Series  
Released 06/14  with 12 bit   4:2:2
Sorry if I'm missing something but I read those specs and did not see Dolby HDR represented anywhere for the Toshiba's UHD's.smile.gif

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I'm anxiously awaiting real TVs that feature HDR capability. To my eyes, nothing made a bigger difference in overall image quality than HDR—not even OLED could match the visual delight of having sparkly highlights actually sparkle. It'll take a high-quality LCD panel to pull it off properly, but what I saw at CES was quite convincing. 

I hope to see Vizio's Reference Series for the second time at a press event two weeks from now. With any luck, that event will include crucial information, such as when those TVs (especially the 65-inch) might go into production.

What I'd really like to see is a Dolby Vision-enabled video card that could render HDR video games and HDR photos for Dolby Vision-enabled displays. 

 

I wouldn't be surprised if this technology finds its way onto phones and tablets.

 


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Quote:
Originally Posted by ops1567 View Post
 

http://www.toshiba.com/us/press-release/100945

 

L9400U Series  Released 06/14  with 12 bit   4:2:2

 

Per the features listed in that press release, the Toshiba L9400U & L9450U use their own Radiance 4K Full Array LED panels in combination with their own CQ 4K engine, which provides resolution restoration, motion interpolation, dynamic detail enhancement, color enhancement, and dynamic noise reduction.  So, they do provide their own version of HDR, but it is not Dolby Vision and, AFAIK, simply expands the dynamic range of the given signal.  There is no content currently being encoded w/ HDR information for use w/ Toshiba's CQ 4K engine.  What was your source of information for the "12-bit 4:2:2" claim?  I couldn't find anything on it.

 

Sony is taking a similar approach w/ their X-tended Dynamic Range & X-tended Dynamic Range Pro features in the 2014 XBR-XXx900B & XBR-XXx950B models.  Again, they simply expand the dynamic range of the given signal and have no way of reading HDR information that may be encoded into the content itself.  At least, they haven't announced that it can or that they plan to actually create content that has HDR information encoded into it.  If they did, it is highly likely that they would use their own proprietary content/display system, similar to how only Sony makes movies that actually make use of xvYCC (extended color) with their Triluminos display technology.  My guess is that they won't have their own content encoding system for HDR for at least another year or two.  I'm sure that much of what Dolby has done is patented, so Sony would have to find a way to do the same thing without infringing on those patents.

 

So far, nobody has released a display that features Dolby Vision.  As Scott said in post #4, the only displays to feature Dolby Vision thus far were the CES 2014 demo's from Vizio (Reference Series), Sharp, and TCL.  And, of course, Dolby's own reference panel.  AFAIK, neither Sharp nor TCL have said whether they will be selling displays that feature it.  Vizio has announced that it will be included in their Reference Series models, but no release date or pricing has been announced yet.  The assumption is that it would be fall of 2014, but many are skeptical that it will happen.  Dolby has no plans to manufacture displays.

 

Assuming that the Vizio Reference series is released later this year and that it does include Dolby Vision processing, the next question is...where do you get content that includes Dolby Vision encoded metadata?  FilmLight makes post-production tools that can be used to create content that includes HDR metadata, but on which movies are the colorists actually using this feature?  Supposing one or more movie studios use it for a handful of 4K movies in the next 6 months, how will those movies be delivered to your home?  Will Vizio host their own streaming service from which you can stream these HDR encoded movies directly to your Vizio Reference Series display?  Will Vizio come out with their own media player w/ built-in hard drive, allowing you to download rather than stream?  Will any other services carry a version of the movie that includes this metadata?  Will any new streaming devices (e.g. Roku 4K, AppleTV 4th gen, etc.) support it?

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Originally Posted by imagic View Post

I hope to see Vizio's Reference Series for the second time at a press event two weeks from now. With any luck, that event will include crucial information, such as when those TVs (especially the 65-inch) might go into production.
You need to get someone in a headlock until they cough up a MSRP and a timeline. wink.gif
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post #18 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post

Per the features listed in that press release, the Toshiba L9400U & L9450U use their own Radiance 4K Full Array LED panels in combination with their own CQ 4K engine, which provides resolution restoration, motion interpolation, dynamic detail enhancement, color enhancement, and dynamic noise reduction.  So, they do provide their own version of HDR, but it is not Dolby Vision and, AFAIK, simply expands the dynamic range of the given signal.  There is no content currently being encoded w/ HDR information for use w/ Toshiba's CQ 4K engine.  What was your source of information for the "12-bit 4:2:2" claim?  I couldn't find anything on it.

Sony is taking a similar approach w/ their X-tended Dynamic Range & X-tended Dynamic Range Pro features in the 2014 XBR-XXx900B & XBR-XXx950B models.  Again, they simply expand the dynamic range of the given signal and have no way of reading HDR information that may be encoded into the content itself.  At least, they haven't announced that it can or that they plan to actually create content that has HDR information encoded into it.  If they did, it is highly likely that they would use their own proprietary content/display system, similar to how only Sony makes movies that actually make use of xvYCC (extended color) with their Triluminos display technology.  My guess is that they won't have their own content encoding system for HDR for at least another year or two.  I'm sure that much of what Dolby has done is patented, so Sony would have to find a way to do the same thing without infringing on those patents.

So far, nobody has released a display that features Dolby Vision.  As Scott said in post #4, the only displays to feature Dolby Vision thus far were the CES 2014 demo's from Vizio (Reference Series), Sharp, and TCL.  And, of course, Dolby's own reference panel.  AFAIK, neither Sharp nor TCL have said whether they will be selling displays that feature it.  Vizio has announced that it will be included in their Reference Series models, but no release date or pricing has been announced yet.  The assumption is that it would be fall of 2014, but many are skeptical that it will happen.  Dolby has no plans to manufacture displays.

Assuming that the Vizio Reference series is released later this year and that it does include Dolby Vision processing, the next question is...where do you get content that includes Dolby Vision encoded metadata?  FilmLight makes post-production tools that can be used to create content that includes HDR metadata, but on which movies are the colorists actually using this feature?  Supposing one or more movie studios use it for a handful of 4K movies in the next 6 months, how will those movies be delivered to your home?  Will Vizio host their own streaming service from which you can stream these HDR encoded movies directly to your Vizio Reference Series display?  Will Vizio come out with their own media player w/ built-in hard drive, allowing you to download rather than stream?  Will any other services carry a version of the movie that includes this metadata?  Will any new streaming devices (e.g. Roku 4K, AppleTV 4th gen, etc.) support it?

Excellent post. I am personally deliberating between a 4K OLED and the Vizio Reference series and am waiting on the answer to exactly the questions you posted to make my decision. The industry is at a turning point and consensus needs to be arrived at soon before the entire consumer marketplace becomes a **** show of different standards. It's an exciting time for UHD, HDR, etc. but the pace of change is excruciatingly slow.
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post #19 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 11:15 AM
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Another question that needs to be answered: Are there commercial cinemas that can offer a 10,000 nit experience currently in existence?

Believe SMPTE has the current standards at 55 nits for cinemas.
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post #20 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 11:28 AM
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I have said this over and over, on many threads that address some of these new technologies, we will never see half of what this industry is proposing.

Rec 2020 forget it .....way too involved DCI at best.
4:4:4 no way.....we will be lucky to get 4:2:2 as the new standard
16 bit...please, they will settle on 10 bit, 12 bit if we get lucky
HDR I can see it happening if Dolby has enough studios backing this.....again a big "IF".
HFR sure, this I can see perhaps making it.

Think deep colour guys, sure most displays can handle it but name 1 film/program/short etc that ever implemented this (your own camcorder movies don't count) SORRY!!

Paul
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post #21 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 12:09 PM
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Great article as usual Scott. As others have said, it would be really nice to know if other manufacturers have come on board (besides the ones we already knew from CES). Content wise, it's been said that there is an HDR graded version of Gravity ready to go. They just need a way to distribute it (4K BluRay or Streaming) and screens to show it on. Therefore it would also be nice to know how soon HDR TVs will come out. Im assuming that this tech would be reserved for flagship models.

CES 2014 was all about UHD. Hopefully CES 2015 will be about extending UHD with HDR and Wide color.
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post #22 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westa6969 View Post


Sorry if I'm missing something but I read those specs and did not see Dolby HDR represented anywhere for the Toshiba's UHD's.smile.gif

They askeD :

"Are any TV manufacturers considering using HDR?  "

I did not write  Dolby  HDR  

you Not have to produce HDR  WITH Dolby 

 

Quote:
What was your source of information for the "12-bit 4:2:2" claim?  

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1527302/toshiba-4k-65l9400-65z9x-and-vizio-65-reference-series-10-bit-panel#post_24607740

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post #23 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 01:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ops1567 View Post
 

They askeD :

"Are any TV manufacturers considering using HDR?  "

I did not write  Dolby  HDR  

you Not have to produce HDR  WITH Dolby 

 

 

Absolutely.  I wasn't criticizing.  I just wanted to clarify since the original topic was talking about Dolby Vision and we don't know if the person asking the question meant Dolby Vision's version of HDR in particular.  Not everyone's version is the same.

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post #24 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 01:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Another question that needs to be answered: Are there commercial cinemas that can offer a 10,000 nit experience currently in existence?

Believe SMPTE has the current standards at 55 nits for cinemas.


There are no commercial cinemas that can offer a 10,000-nit experience, not by a long shot. The generally accepted standard for commercial cinema is 14 fL or 48 nits. Projectors can't reach anywhere close to 10,000 nits and won't be able to for a long time—that is, unless they are focused down to a very small screen size as Dolby did in its viewer-preference studies.


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post #25 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ops1567 View Post
Quote:
What was your source of information for the "12-bit 4:2:2" claim?  

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1527302/toshiba-4k-65l9400-65z9x-and-vizio-65-reference-series-10-bit-panel#post_24607740

 

Thanks.  I will definitely have to keep the Toshiba's on my watch list.

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post #26 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 01:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by westa6969 View Post

This is Mensa Level HT Discussion - zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz! wink.gif

Wake us when our eyes can simply audition and buy a Consumer HDR panel. The Charts may mean something to ISFer's and other Mensa Techs but dang feel like a Tard without simply seeing HDR. Charts = potential or sets a bar whereas end product our eyes provide PROOF of what and the importance of HDR and without seeing I can't believe/perceive.

Sort of like reading a spec sheet to determine PQ versus an audition with what makes my eyes/mind go WoW!

Bottom line is Dolby and Vizio, et al - needs to quit talking and puffing Reference HDR and start PRODUCING otherwise the discussion is meaningless. If they've been working on this for several years where the hell is it and they can't even give us dates of production otherwise it's Trade Show B.S.

Bring it on Vizio!cool.gif


Well, this is the AV Science Forum, after all...;) Seriously, I completely agree that all the graphs and info in the world are nothing compared with actually seeing HDR for yourself. I wish there was somewhere consumers could see it, but it's still in the development stages. I can't prod the manufacturers to go faster and get something out; they take the time they take. And when such sets finally do become commercially available, there will have to be content graded for HDR to see its full potential. I'm afraid we must be patient for now.


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post #27 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post


Well, this is the AV Science Forum, after all...wink.gif Seriously, I completely agree that all the graphs and info in the world are nothing compared with actually seeing HDR for yourself. I wish there was somewhere consumers could see it, but it's still in the development stages. I can't prod the manufacturers to go faster and get something out; they take the time they take. And when such sets finally do become commercially available, there will have to be content graded for HDR to see its full potential. I'm afraid we must be patient for now.
[/quote

We have to wait and see. Firstly BDA has to make their decision on what things are going into the 4K BD Disk. Will it be Rec.2020, 12bit, 422, 60fps etc. It's a time where the factions at play can change the "old" tech for tv's based on the CRT model to something newer with the benefit of increased image quality. I really hope Rec.2020 will be adopted . Nanosy claimes 97 % coverage for Rec.2020 using their QDEF film. This is good news. I think that all the key players , software, manufacturers etc. have to wait and catch up to these proposed new standards, content takes time .
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post #28 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by ops1567 View Post

Thank you  Scott
 On the article
But the price of the screen  Vizio RS120 65"  confused.gif   

what with 3D and Dolby Vision-enabled HDR display  confused.gif

Is Dolby working on their own screen  No other manufacturer  confused.gif    (With all manufacturers do not understand if they also produce independent screen )

I just wish that Vizio would give us pricing into on their Reference series.
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post #29 of 36 Old 05-28-2014, 11:38 PM
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Would seem like the display would need serious improvements in ANSI contrast/intrascene contrast as LCD's aren't showing us the dynamic range we currently have in an image. I'd be interested to see if the HDR version would help with perceived contrast on standard sets.

Still not entirely sure I get what they are doing here as most HDR conversations outside of movies are in regards to photography image capture and gaming (like what Valve did a number of years back in their engine). This seems to not be about the image capture but about the mastering and the display.
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post #30 of 36 Old 05-29-2014, 07:00 AM
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Hi,

Many thanks Scott, for this very intresting article.

Now I'm really curious to see how HDR will be translated into the HT projectors world, for its' home use on large screens.

Fascinating World...

Hugo
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