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post #1 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:07 PM - Thread Starter
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The One Advantage of Curved LCD TVs



Are curved-screen LCD TVs a pure gimmick? Mark Henninger discusses the one advantage this form factor can offer versus flat LCDs, especially for UHD/4K models.

------

What good is a curved-screen TV? The consensus among many TV reviewers is that the curve looks cool, but it adds nothing to the viewing experience—in fact, some say it degrades the experience from off axis. However, the more I thought about it, the more I realized that this form factor does have something to offer the dedicated videophile. There's only one catch—it's a solo affair.

One of the main weaknesses of many LED-lit LCD TVs is a relatively limited optimal viewing angle, as compared to plasma and OLED. TVs that use VA (vertically aligned) LCD panels often have deep blacks when viewed head-on, but they quickly lose contrast when viewed from an angle. Even when you sit centered facing a flat screen, you view the edges of that screen at an angle. Depending on how close you sit, that can lead to a loss of picture quality toward the edges of the screen. Now, consider UHD/4K resolution: It requires the viewer to get close to the screen to see all the detail. When viewing a curved screen close up and centered, the viewing angle at a screen's edges stays closer to perpendicular than it does with a flat screen.

For one solitary viewer who sits in the right position, a curved LCD screen provides the very tangible benefit of keeping the entire panel aimed at the viewer, which can result in higher contrast and greater uniformity across the entire screen. For anyone who needs a UHD/4K TV as a calibrated PC display for video or photo editing, a curved LCD could potentially provide the best price/performance ratio versus an OLED display. With curved LED-edgelit displays, as long as you stay in the "sweet spot," you'll see the maximum image quality the display has to offer from edge to edge.


Not all curved screen are the same, optimal viewing angles and distances will vary. This graphic is for illustrative purposes only.

The problem with curved LCD screens is that the form factor provides no tangible benefit for off-axis viewers, and UHD/4K content offers no significant benefits to viewers who sit 10 or 12 feet away from a 55- or 65-inch screen. In order to take full advantage of a UHD/4K curved screen, you need to sit in the optimum image-quality zone, centered and close enough to see the extra detail in UHD/4K content. And even if you set everything up perfectly, because of the paucity of UHD TV programming and movies, you won't be watching that much true UHD/4K content anyway. That's why I see curved LED edgelit LCDs as an option worth considering for use with a PC—many modern games do support 3820 x 2160 resolution, and if your video card is up to the task, UHD/4K video games look spectacular. Ultimately, I'm not convinced that curved screens are the best option for anyone looking to buy a TV for use in the living room or a small home theater.

I became acutely aware of these issues thanks to the 65-inch Panasonic AX800U I have in for review. It's a flat LED-edgelit UHD/4K TV with a great-looking picture—when viewed head on. However, to fully take advantage of its UHD/4K resolution, I have to get quite close to the screen. When I do, the loss of contrast and saturation near the screen edges becomes noticeable. I wish I had a Samsung curved LCD in my studio for comparison, but I don't. Instead, I took a ride down to my local Best Buy, which just recently added a dedicated display area for Samsung curved-screen TVs.


My local Best Buy just installed a dedicated Samsung curved screen display area.

At Best Buy, I spent about an hour scrutinizing the latest UHD/4K Samsung LCDs to see if the curve genuinely improves image quality, at least for one perfectly positioned viewer. Although the exercise was unscientific, I found that the reality matched up quite well with my hypothesis. When viewed head-on, the Samsung curved LED-edgelit UHD/4K LCDs exhibited exceptional image quality. Off angle, I could see the same drop in contrast that affects other LCDs. That's when I realized that a curved screen could be an advantage under the right conditions, regardless of the screen size. In fact, I think a curved screen could be of greatest benefit for smaller screen sizes—namely, displays used for computing and gaming.

I noticed something else when I was at Best Buy—Samsung's curved-screen showcase is a distinct standalone space with few distractions, and the actual TVs are relatively far apart from each other. In this space, shoppers naturally stand at the right distance, and centered, when they check out the TVs. I suspect the curve offers an advantage over flat edgelit UHD/4K LCD TVs when viewed by potential buyers on the showroom floor, thanks to the natural tendency to seek out that optimum, centered position.

Why is a small curved screen a good thing? It comes down to this: In order to fully appreciate all that the extra resolution has to offer, you need to be physically close to a UHD/4K TV. In terms of the field of view, the screen should look like you are sitting in an Imax theater, even if is a relatively small screen. Once you are six feet or more from a 55-inch UHD/4K TV, you are not seeing any benefit from the extra resolution. An optimal viewing distance for a 55-inch UHD/4K TV is around 5 feet; at that distance, a curved screen becomes an advantage—at least for edgelit LCD displays with limited viewing angles.

Even if you sit at a typical 1080p viewing distance, the curved screen appears to offer a benefit over many flat panels—but again, it only works for one viewer, perhaps two. With LCDs that have a relatively narrow viewing angle, I've noticed contrast-related issues sitting seven feet away from a 60-inch edgelit VA (vertical-alignment) LCD screen. Recently, I've paid particular attention to the relatively narrow viewing angle of many 1080p VA LCDs. At optimal 1080p viewing distances, I still see contrast and/or saturation fall-off.

Some of the marketing hype for curved-screen LCDs promises a lot more than improved color and contrast for one viewer—it promises a more immersive experience for all viewers. I don't agree with that pitch; I don't find curved screens any more immersive than flat screens. I've spent considerable time dwelling on this topic, and the only technical advantage I see for curved edgelit LCD TVs is the way it compensates for limited viewing angles—for one viewer. However, that one viewer gets to enjoy exceptional image quality. Plasma is fading fast, and until UHD/4K OLEDs hit store shelves, curved UHD/4K LCDs might just be the best option for solitary videophiles. Even when OLED arrives, it's likely that curved LCDs will cost a lot less; depending on the needs of the buyer, Samsung's approach to image quality might be good enough—for the one lucky person sitting in the sweet spot, that is.

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Last edited by imagic; 07-15-2014 at 03:32 AM.
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post #2 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post


Are curved-screen LCD TVs a pure gimmick? Mark Henninger discusses the one advantage this form factor can offer versus flat LCDs, especially for UHD/4K models.

------

What good is a curved-screen TV? The consensus among many TV reviewers is that the curve looks cool, but it adds nothing to the viewing experience—in fact, some say it degrades the experience from off axis. However, the more I thought about it, the more I realized that this form factor does have something to offer the dedicated videophile. There's only one catch—it's a solo affair.

One of the main weaknesses of many LED-lit LCD TVs is a relatively limited optimal viewing angle, as compared to plasma and OLED. TVs that use VA (vertically aligned) LCD panels often have deep blacks when viewed head-on, but they quickly lose contrast when viewed from an angle. Even when you sit centered facing a flat screen, you view the edges of that screen at an angle. Depending on how close you sit, that can lead to a loss of picture quality toward the edges of the screen. Now, consider UHD/4K resolution: It requires the viewer to get close to the screen to see all the detail. When viewing a curved screen close up and centered, the viewing angle at a screen's edges stays closer to perpendicular than it does with a flat screen.

For one solitary viewer who sits in the right position, a curved LCD screen provides the very tangible benefit of keeping the entire panel aimed at the viewer, which can result in higher contrast and greater uniformity across the entire screen. For anyone who needs a UHD/4K TV as a calibrated PC display for video or photo editing, a curved LCD could potentially provide the best price/performance ratio versus an OLED display. With curved LED-edgelit displays, as long as you stay in the "sweet spot," you'll see the maximum image quality the display has to offer from edge to edge.


Not all curved screen are the same, optimal viewing angles and distances will vary. This graphic is for illustrative purposes only.

The problem with curved LCD screens is that the form factor provides no tangible benefit for off-axis viewers, and UHD/4K content offers no significant benefits to viewers who sit 10 or 12 feet away from a 55- or 65-inch screen. In order to take full advantage of a UHD/4K curved screen, you need to sit in the optimum image-quality zone, centered and close enough to see the extra detail in UHD/4K content. And even if you set everything up perfectly, because of the paucity of UHD TV programming and movies, you won't be watching that much true UHD/4K content anyway. That's why I see curved LED edgelit LCDs as an option worth considering for use with a PC—many modern games do support 3820 x 2160 resolution, and if your video card is up to the task, UHD/4K video games look spectacular. Ultimately, I'm not convinced that curved screens are the best option for anyone looking to buy a TV for use in the living room or a small home theater.

I became acutely aware of these issues thanks to the 65-inch Panasonic AX800U I have in for review. It's a flat LED-edgelit UHD/4K TV with a great-looking picture—when viewed head on. However, to fully take advantage of its UHD/4K resolution, I have to get quite close to the screen. When I do, the loss of contrast and saturation near the screen edges becomes noticeable. I wish I had a Samsung curved LCD in my studio for comparison, but I don't. Instead, I took a ride down to my local Best Buy, which just recently added a dedicated display area for Samsung curved-screen TVs.


My local Best Buy just installed a dedicated Samsung curved screen display area.

At Best Buy, I spent about an hour scrutinizing the latest UHD/4K Samsung LCDs to see if the curve genuinely improves image quality, at least for one perfectly positioned viewer. Although the exercise was unscientific, I found that the reality matched up quite well with my hypothesis. When viewed head-on, the Samsung curved LED-edgelit UHD/4K LCDs exhibited exceptional image quality. Off angle, I could see the same drop in contrast that affects other LCDs. That's when I realized that a curved screen could be an advantage under the right conditions, regardless of the screen size. In fact, I think a curved screen could be of greatest benefit for smaller screen sizes—namely, displays used for computing and gaming.

I noticed something else when I was at Best Buy—Samsung's curved-screen showcase is a distinct standalone space with few distractions, and the actual TVs are relatively far apart from each other. In this space, shoppers naturally stand at the right distance, and centered, when they check out the TVs. I suspect the curve offers an advantage over flat edgelit UHD/4K LCD TVs when viewed by potential buyers on the showroom floor, thanks to the natural tendency to seek out that optimum, centered position.

Why is a small curved screen a good thing? It come down to this: In order to fully appreciate all that the extra resolution has to offer, you need to be physically close to a UHD/4K TV. In terms of the field of view, the screen should look like you are sitting in an Imax theater, even if is a relatively small screen. Once you are six feet or more from a 55-inch UHD/4K TV, you are not seeing any benefit from the extra resolution. An optimal viewing distance for a 55-inch UHD/4K TV is around 5 feet; at that distance, a curved screen becomes an advantage—at least for edgelit LCD displays with limited viewing angles.

Even if you sit at a typical 1080p viewing distance, the curved screen appears to offer a benefit over many flat panels—but again, it only works for one viewer, perhaps two. With LCDs that have a relatively narrow viewing angle, I've noticed contrast-related issues sitting seven feet away from a 60-inch edgelit VA (vertical-alignment) LCD screen. Recently, I've paid particular attention to the relatively narrow viewing angle of many 1080p VA LCDs. At optimal 1080p viewing distances, I still see contrast and/or saturation fall-off.

Some of the marketing hype for curved-screen LCDs promises a lot more than improved color and contrast for one viewer—it promises a more immersive experience for all viewers. I don't agree with that pitch; I don't find curved screens any more immersive than flat screens. I've spent considerable time dwelling on this topic, and the only technical advantage I see for curved edgelit LCD TVs is the way it compensates for limited viewing angles—for one viewer. However, that one viewer gets to enjoy exceptional image quality. Plasma is fading fast, and until UHD/4K OLEDs hit store shelves, curved UHD/4K LCDs might just be the best option for solitary videophiles. Even when OLED arrives, it's likely that curved LCDs will cost a lot less; depending on the needs of the buyer, Samsung's approach to image quality might be good enough—for the one lucky person sitting in the sweet spot, that is.

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Mark,

Good post. And does probably rationalize some benefit for a curved VA LED screen. Still does not explain why LG would curve their WOLED screens which have no off-axis contrast drop off, though.

Also, since the better VA LED/LCDs show little-to-no drop off until at least 20 degrees or so, it would be interesting to expand your diagram to see how much wider the effective optimal viewing 'becomes' with the Samsung curve - hopefully 2 viewers sitting close together in the sweet spot can both appreciate some improvement.

Also, note that your example is almost 180 degrees different than Samsung's marketing campaign, where they show viewers scattered all over the room and talk about a 'more comfortable' viewing experience.
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post #3 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:33 PM
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many modern games do support 3820 x 2160 resolution,
you can easily say most games nearly all games.
games usually aren't make for a resolution in the past 10 years.
games based on a resolution are rare and normally made for 720p or lower.
newer games like this are: long live the queen, dungeon of the endless or FTL: FASTER THAN LIGHT.
most games don't care about resolution at all. 5760x1080 or 1280x960 they don't care only your hardware in term of frames per sec.
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post #4 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by fafrd View Post
Mark,

Good post. And does probably rationalize some benefit for a curved VA LED screen. Still does not explain why LG would curve their WOLED screens which have no off-axis contrast drop off, though.

Also, since the better VA LED/LCDs show little-to-no drop off until at least 20 degrees or so, it would be interesting to expand your diagram to see how much wider the effective optimal viewing 'becomes' with the Samsung curve - hopefully 2 viewers sitting close together in the sweet spot can both appreciate some improvement.

Also, note that your example is almost 180 degrees different than Samsung's marketing campaign, where they show viewers scattered all over the room and talk about a 'more comfortable' viewing experience.
I'm suspect that two viewers can get some advantage out of a larger-sized curved screen, if they sit close to each other. The seemed to be the case with the 78-inch U9000F; I could do the cha cha, it stayed vibrant with great contrast within a four or five foot range.

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Last edited by imagic; 07-14-2014 at 05:44 PM.
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post #5 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:41 PM
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post #6 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:50 PM
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It is interesting; TV's evolution. We started with a convex screen, then we gradually flatten it, and now we are in concave territory.

The real world surrounding us is neither one of those, it is all of them in a 3D holographic perspective.

The field depth (perspective) has to be proportional to our actual vision in real life; are curved screens taking that into consideration, and indeed for how many viewers?

Focus on the entire screen's surface; is it correct on curved screens? ...And again, for how many viewers?

In theaters, screen and sound are built for large audiences in mind.
At home, you cannot follow the same rules, or can you? ...I guess it depends of SIZE and numbers of viewers/listeners...
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post #7 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 05:52 PM
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I saw the photo and thought you were going to say the one advantage is that the display booth can have a continuous curved video wall.
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post #8 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 06:08 PM
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Good stuff Mark. Excellent observations. Sounds plausible.
I agree. It makes complete sense and was a good read.
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post #9 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 06:12 PM
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I realized that this form factor does have something to offer the dedicated videophile. There's only one catch—it's a solo affair.

Mark, how many dedicated videophiles are there in the world will want a dedicated LCD display just for themselves? Is that a market that will support curved screens when the rest of the market realizes that we've been taken again?
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post #10 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
I'm suspect that two viewers can get some advantage out of a larger-sized curved screen, if they sit close to each other. The seemed to be the case with the 78-inch U9000F; I could do the cha cha, it stayed vibrant with great contrast within a four or five foot range.

Do you have any idea what the radius of curvature is on the Samsung 65" and 78" HU9000?


If you are sitting aligned with one edge of the screen at 1.5 times screen width, the ideal 'flat' on-axis image will become curved to a non-ideal angle of X degrees off-axis and the far side of a screen which would have an angle of 33 degrees off-axis if it was flat, would have an angle of 33-X degrees.


If the radius of curvature is 3 times screen width, X works out to be about 10 degrees, meaning the near edge would move from being 0 degrees off-axis to 10 degrees off-axis and the far edge goes from being 33 degrees off-axis to being only 23 degrees off-axis.


A 78" screen has a width of 68" (more than 5 feet), so I the radius of curvature is at least 17 feet, the curve would allow off-axis viewing angles to be maintained within a 20 degree off-angle 'cone' for a full 5 foot width viewing at a distance of 8.5 feet.


So your theory makes sense for a full 2-3 cozy viewer sweetspot viewing from 1.5 times screen width (compared to the example of viewing from 2.5 times screen width which is 'too far' to appreciate the added detail of UHD).


This theory still does nothing to explain the curve on Samsung's and LG's OLED TVs though...
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post #11 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 07:06 PM
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Curved screens destroy the rainforests.

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I saw the photo and thought you were going to say the one advantage is that the display booth can have a continuous curved video wall.
My thoughts exactly - I thought they were going to announce Samsung would be official display of the Guggenheim.

When I see a curved screen I think of the absurd Raymond James ad about a tall-hat craze in the ~19th century:

Curved screens take up more volume than their flat cousins during transit, allowing less to be packed into each shipping container. This reduces shipping efficiency, and increases the fossil fuel consumption required to get the displays to market. I just made all this up, but it stands to reason that a curved display necessarily creates unusable voids on both sides of the screen when packaged in a rectangular box.
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post #12 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 07:57 PM
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The way I look at, it was tried in the 80s with the old CRT front projector and it failed.
I remember sitting it Junior ranks Mess when I was with a Combat Engineer Unit and seeying one.

I don't think it will take off since it does not offer a better view if you sit way left or right, but the same could be said for sound!
I least when it come to sound, not too many people care and tried to be dead center.

Just my personnel opinion.

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I think curved screens are incredibly stupid. To me, this is just another marketing gimmick by the manufacturers designed to con consumers into buying something they don't really need. I also think they're just trying to differentiate their products from everybody else's.

My objection to curved screens in general is that if you have a wide horizontal image -- my favorite example is the Discovery 1 spaceship in the movie 2001 -- which looks like a "U," drooping on the edges. On a conventional straight screen, the ship is as flat as a razor.

I think in this case, LG and Samsung are trying to solve a problem that doesn't really exist, plus they're trying to hype sales. I would much rather they just spend time making sets that provide accurate pictures according to real industry standards and stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Note that nobody is mastering 4K images with curved screens.
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RE: Guggenheim

Reminds me that the best way to view art at Wright's Guggenheim is on rollerblades.

'splains why it's a "one off monument" - it's not as if every multi-story art museum built after 1960 was constructed in the form of a spiral... in fact, none follow his example.

Guess I'll be purchasing my large format UHDTV after this issue is put to rest.
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post #15 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 08:46 PM
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Just my preference.... I can't stand curved from what I see. It's a gimmick like 3d for now. Will never buy one as there is usually more than one person watching, and... We don't a want all that space, might as well have a CRT box. I just hope it falls flat on its face so the vendors make there best tvs flat again. Until then I will keep my 2 kuros. Flat 4k oled is what I am waiting for.
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post #16 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 08:58 PM
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Huge curved screens @ your Cineplex theaters perhaps, but @ home is not necessary, only for more money to the TV manufacturers.
And even there it is uncertain. So, a solo affair, or with your lover hugging closely...

Curved screens at home (Samsung); a new revolution for solo viewers.
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post #17 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 09:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits View Post
I realized that this form factor does have something to offer the dedicated videophile. There's only one catch—it's a solo affair.

Mark, how many dedicated videophiles are there in the world will want a dedicated LCD display just for themselves? Is that a market that will support curved screens when the rest of the market realizes that we've been taken again?
While everything has it's pluses and minuses, the pluses of curved screens don't come anywhere near offsetting the minuses.

And 4K screens smaller than 80"? I thought the whole point of 4K was the fact that it would fill larger screens with more pixls because even 1080p didn't have enough at those sizes? 1080p doesn't have that problem at 55" or 60".
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post #18 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 09:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
Note that nobody is mastering 4K images with curved screens.
But then again nobody is mastering 4K images with any of the 'crap' displays that we lowly consumers watch our content on.
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post #19 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 09:52 PM
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Just bought curved Samsung 65HU9000 today after going through a painful experience of owning and returning four Panasonic 65AX800 and Sony 70W850B (dead pixels, vertical banding, radial banding, bad uniformity).

Hopefully this TV ends my disappointments for this year.

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post #20 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 10:14 PM
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I've said from the beginning, there could be benefit to having the edges of the screen aimed at the viewer, and it doesn't have to be a 'single' spot. while only one spot may be 'perfect', anything inside the focal cone is at least improved. anything outside that focal cone however, would be worse.
anyway, this image helps explain what I mean:



the key imo, is subtlety. the curve needs to be very slight, or else the 'maximum viewing distance' should be a specification clearly labelled on the box.


the only thing is, the display really needs to be curved in both dimensions, otherwise you end up with a bowtie shaped image, which really isn't making anything better(unless the source compensates for this??). and the only reason anybody would need to worry about poor off-angle contrast, is if they were stuck with LCD.


so, instead of keeping plasma, or pushing oled, we've decided to take the technology with the most problems that need to be fixed, bandaid fix one of those problems, and call it progress... awesome


personally, I find the 'fisheye' look of curved screens to be borderline nauseating. definitely NOT a step in the right direction, unless they tone it WAY down.

Last edited by fierce_gt; 07-14-2014 at 10:29 PM.
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post #21 of 121 Old 07-14-2014, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by WHATTHEDILEO View Post
Curved screens take up more volume than their flat cousins during transit, allowing less to be packed into each shipping container. This reduces shipping efficiency, and increases the fossil fuel consumption required to get the displays to market. I just made all this up, but it stands to reason that a curved display necessarily creates unusable voids on both sides of the screen when packaged in a rectangular box.
ahh, but a curve is a stronger shape, so perhaps they will need less packaging and all will even out?
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post #22 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 12:11 AM
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Normals do not sit up close like some AVSers. They just don't.

So while I don't dispute the premise here, I dispute very much that it constitutes anything even slightly meaningful.
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There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working. (Oh, and plasma didn't die because of logistics problems, nor does OLED ship in big boxes because it comes from Korea.)
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post #23 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 12:24 AM
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At which size does the curved angle (LCD LED panel) becomes advantageous, disadvantageous? ...30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100" ?

In theaters the curved screens are at what exact angle, 170° ? ...165° ? ...160° ?

Those curved Samsung screens; they are curved at the exact same angle as in the ones from the public movie theaters?
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post #24 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 02:06 AM
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post #25 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 03:56 AM
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I realized that this form factor does have something to offer the dedicated videophile. There's only one catch—it's a solo affair.

Mark, how many dedicated videophiles are there in the world will want a dedicated LCD display just for themselves? Is that a market that will support curved screens when the rest of the market realizes that we've been taken again?
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post #26 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 04:12 AM
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I think curved screens are incredibly stupid. To me, this is just another marketing gimmick by the manufacturers designed to con consumers into buying something they don't really need. I also think they're just trying to differentiate their products from everybody else's.

My objection to curved screens in general is that if you have a wide horizontal image -- my favorite example is the Discovery 1 spaceship in the movie 2001 -- which looks like a "U," drooping on the edges. On a conventional straight screen, the ship is as flat as a razor.

I think in this case, LG and Samsung are trying to solve a problem that doesn't really exist, plus they're trying to hype sales. I would much rather they just spend time making sets that provide accurate pictures according to real industry standards and stop trying to reinvent the wheel. Note that nobody is mastering 4K images with curved screens.
The public likes big and cheap and won't be buy something they don't like the look of. They pay the bills for the TV companies. They should be hyping sales that what pays for R and D for better TV's.
The future for video is projectors, for those who really care about the picture they see. Leave the dead end of flat panels...
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post #27 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 04:16 AM
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I've said from the beginning, there could be benefit to having the edges of the screen aimed at the viewer, and it doesn't have to be a 'single' spot. while only one spot may be 'perfect', anything inside the focal cone is at least improved. anything outside that focal cone however, would be worse.
anyway, this image helps explain what I mean:



the key imo, is subtlety. the curve needs to be very slight, or else the 'maximum viewing distance' should be a specification clearly labelled on the box.


the only thing is, the display really needs to be curved in both dimensions, otherwise you end up with a bowtie shaped image, which really isn't making anything better(unless the source compensates for this??). and the only reason anybody would need to worry about poor off-angle contrast, is if they were stuck with LCD.


so, instead of keeping plasma, or pushing oled, we've decided to take the technology with the most problems that need to be fixed, bandaid fix one of those problems, and call it progress... awesome


personally, I find the 'fisheye' look of curved screens to be borderline nauseating. definitely NOT a step in the right direction, unless they tone it WAY down.
Cinerama anyone? That picture looks just like a big cinerama screen.
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post #28 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 04:39 AM
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Just bought curved Samsung 65HU9000 today after going through a painful experience of owning and returning four Panasonic 65AX800 and Sony 70W850B (dead pixels, vertical banding, radial banding, bad uniformity).

Hopefully this TV ends my disappointments for this year.
We have had our U9000 (65") for a whole week now. I wanted the highest end mainstream Samsung, and it happened to be the curved model. If they would of offered a similar flat model, I probably would of gone there instead.

That said, the curve TV looks gorgeous, either on or off, and we love the picture. Unlike a screen hanging on a wall, the curved TV sitting on a credenza actually looks like a modern television, even a work of art. So the la-di-da interior decorators are going to love em. If viewed at eye level, the curve is barely noticeable (not like that pic above).

So the manufacturers should give us the option. Flat for wall mounting, curved for stand mounting.

One thing not mentioned here is the screen reflection issue. The TV will pick up less reflections because of the curve, but if it does, it washes it across the screen more, making it worst. So it's a crap shoot whether any particular setup will work in a normal non-dedicated room. Ours worked out fine.
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Last edited by jkhome; 07-15-2014 at 04:52 AM.
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post #29 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 05:13 AM
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That is actually hilarious. I do watch a lot of movies by myself sitting ~5' from a 65" screen. I may be one of the few, but I definitely would enjoy the curve in my setting

It could never be my everyday set though.
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post #30 of 121 Old 07-15-2014, 05:27 AM
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The PROBLEM with curved LCD screens is that they as of yet can not make a SMOOTHLY curved Plexiglas curved to cover it. Thus any reflections which appear on the screen are wavy and inconsistent. The problem with this is as you move ever so slightly while watching the screen, the reflections appear to almost animate, making them MUCH more distracting than they are on a flat screen - where they basically sit there and can be ignored.


Sorry, no curved LCDs for me.

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