***OFFICIAL** 2015 Samsung 4K SUHD JS9000 Series Curved Smart TV Thread - Page 63 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1861 of 4125 Old 12-15-2015, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by larkest View Post
hi, what brand or model of 3d glasses would you recommend for this tv model?, if it could be possible that amazon sells, because i'm from Mexico, thanks
ps: sorry for my bad english

A lot of people seem to like these ones HERE

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post #1862 of 4125 Old 12-15-2015, 04:05 PM
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Exclamation JS Series Picture Settings (General Guide)

This guide contains "Tips" and "General Guidelines" for adjusting the different picture settings on your TV. It includes an in-depth explanation on what each picture setting is for and how its adjustment affects the overall image.

Even though this info is primarily for the Samsung JS series, most of the tips will also apply to other TV models.

Disclaimer: I am in no way an "expert" on the subject nor a professional calibrator. These suggestions are only a general guide and tips on how to adjust your TV "by eye" and are in no way a replacement for a proper professional TV calibration (which requires some specialized calibration instruments and basic calibration skills/know-how).

Calibrating a TV simply means setting it to match a set of established "standards". When your TV at home is properly calibrated, the image you see on your screen will look as close as possible to what the director of the movie or TV show saw on his monitor (e.g. the Hulk will be the same shade of green on both displays).

To assist with "basic calibration", you can always purchase/download a "Calibration DVD" (such as "AVS HD 709" (free), "DVE HD Basics", "Spears & Munsil", or "Disney WOW: World Of Wonder") which contains test material and patterns that will provide an objective way of measuring the accuracy of the image on your TV.

Always keep in mind that the viewing environment and room lighting will affect these adjustments. Making adjustments in a brightly-lit room will result in different settings than if adjustments are made in a dimly-lit room. Therefore, it’s always wise to make adjustments under the appropriate viewing conditions.

I do not recommend simply "copying" someone else’s settings as every TV (even the same model), every pair of eyes, and every viewing environment will be different. You can always use someone else's shared settings as a starting point if you want, however, understand that those settings won't look exactly the same on your TV and, in some cases, might actually make your picture look worse. (For "real world" examples of this, see >this post< by professional calibrator "Chad B" and this article: Sharing Calibration Settings)

P.S. I highly recommend the use of "Bias Lighting" - especially when viewing in a dark or dimly-lit room. "Bias Lights" help in reducing 'eyestrain' and 'eye fatigue'. As an additional benefit, they also increase the "perceived" contrast of the display, enhancing the TV's black levels, and help mitigate 'blooming' and 'clouding' issues.
For more on "Bias Lights", see What Bias Lighting Is and Why You Should Be Using It.
For my "Bias Lights" recommendation see: www.biaslighting.com
(You can also check out >this post< and >this one<)

* Many of these picture settings will be a matter of personal preference. *


Picture Mode

Most "experts" and professional TV calibrators agree that the most accurate picture mode 'out of the box' is the "Movie" mode - that is to say, it is the mode that will bring you closest to a properly calibrated display. I strongly suggest using this mode for TV shows and movies - especially when viewing in a dark or dimly-lit room.

If you have been conditioned to seeing a cooler/bluer, more dynamic picture, the "Movie" mode will appear far too "red" and too dim at first (cooler/bluer colors appear brighter than warmer/redder ones). However, give it a few days for your eyes and brain to adjust to the new more accurate settings (trust me, they will). After a few days, if you go back to one of the more "dynamic" modes, you’ll notice that the picture will appear far too bright and too blue.

Additionally, some of the advanced settings in this guide are only available/adjustable in the "Movie" mode.

* The "Movie" mode is also the preferred picture mode for viewing HDR content.

As an alternative, you can also try the 'somewhat less accurate' "Standard" mode. Although less accurate, the "Standard" picture mode is brighter (bluer) than the "Movie" mode and therefore could be the preferred choice for some when viewing in a bright room.

Note: The different "Picture Modes" are only preset modes that you use as starting points. Once you start changing different settings, regardless of which mode you started in, you have now created a new "Custom" picture mode.

* Any settings recommendations made below are based on the "Movie" mode selection.

(I have mine set to "Movie" for all content.)


Color Tone

This setting adjusts the "Color Temperature" (or the temperature of "white").

Color temperature refers to the color of the light source that's being displayed on your screen. Generally speaking, the "Cool" settings are more suited for viewing in a brightly-lit room whereas the "Warm" settings are more suited for viewing in a dimly-lit room.

In order for your TV to adhere to the director's vision, it needs to reproduce white as closely as possible to the ISF recommended D65 (Daylight 6500K) which is similar to ambient daylight at midday (on a cloudy day). D65 is the standard used throughout the film and TV world.

Going back to expert opinion, most agree that the most accurate setting is one of the "Warm" settings.

Again, you might find that the "Warm" settings make your picture appear too dim and to "red" (or "yellow"). But once again, your eyes/brain will adjust to the new setting in a few days. I would avoid the "Cool" mode if you want an accurate picture. (But again, it does come back to a matter of personal preference.)

Note: On the JS Series, the "Color Tone" setting you select is stored in the TV's memory. When you change the current picture mode, the stored color tone is applied to the new picture mode automatically.

(I have mine set to "Warm 1" [personal preference]; however "Warm 2" is 'slightly more accurate' [closer to D65])


Backlight

This setting adjusts the overall brightness of the screen.

The proper "Backlight" setting will mostly depend on your room lighting (increase it when viewing in a brightly-lit room; decrease it when viewing in a dimly-lit room). The proper setting will also be a matter of personal taste.

If you find that the picture is too dark, simply increase the backlight a little but not too much. Having the backlight set too high can lead to eye-strain and eye-fatigue and can also accentuate any “clouding” or “blooming” issues your set might suffer from.

(I set mine to "10" for a brightly-lit room and "8" for a dimly-lit room.)


Contrast

This setting adjusts the "White Level" of the picture.

A proper "white level" means that the display is producing an adequate amount of light output (called 'luminance') without compromising its ability to clearly distinguish between full 100% white and a slightly less intense white. When white and just-below-white become merged and indistinguishable and all details disappear into white, we refer to this as "crushed whites" or "clipped whites".

However, setting this control too low will result in a dimmer, less intense picture, and a lower contrast ratio.

A good method to properly adjust this setting is to find a brightly lit scene with lots of white/bright areas (e.g. a bright outdoor scene with a bright blue sky and fluffy white clouds). Turn up the contrast level until you start losing detail in the bright/white part of the image. Then dial the setting down a little until the details reappear.

Ideally, the easiest and most accurate method to properly adjust it is by using a calibration test pattern.

(I currently have mine set to "95".)


Brightness

This setting adjusts the "Black Level" of the picture.

The name for this setting should probably be changed on modern TVs because it gets a little confusing. On modern LCD TVs, the "Backlight" setting is what is used to adjust the brightness of the screen, not the "Brightness" setting. This setting is used to adjust the dark parts of an image and determines how "black" the blacks are.

A proper "black level" means that the display produces very deep and dark blacks without obscuring shadow detail. If the brightness control is set too low, gray will appear black ("crushed blacks"), effectively losing information in the shadows (darker details will be lost into black). If the brightness control is set too high, black will appear gray ("elevated blacks"), resulting in a "washed out" picture.

A good method to properly adjust this setting is to find a dark scene in a movie with lots of shadow detail. Turn down the brightness until you start losing shadow detail and everything starts disappearing into blackness. Then dial the setting back up until the shadow details start reappearing but not so much that blacks turn gray and the picture appears "hazy" or "washed out".

However, as with the "Contrast" setting, the ideal method to properly adjust it is with a calibration test pattern.

(I currently have mine set to "44".)


Note: The "Contrast" and "Brightness" settings are interactive; therefore, they might need to be readjusted again after the initial settings are dialed in. Additionally, it's important to keep in mind that these settings affect all colors at the same time.
When both "white level" (Contrast) and "black level" (Brightness) are set properly, the display will reproduce very bright, intense scenes with full white detail and very dark images with excellent shadow detail. This will help you get the most optimal “dynamic range” out of your TV.


Sharpness

This setting uses an artificial technique to control the "crispness" of the picture.

This setting adds an artificial "edge enhancement" to the image (extra information in the form of an artificial outline around the edges of objects that was not there in the first place) in order to give the impression of greater detail. However, it's an illusion. While the image might initially appear more defined, in actual fact the edge enhancement removes or hides some fine detail.

As the sharpness control is raised, the image is altered so that, where edges are detected, subtle highlights are added around them to raise the perceived contrast around the edge. This might make edges look sharper/crisper however it creates "white halos" around them reducing fine detail in those areas of the image.

This setting should be set as low as possible (near the "0" mark). However, on the JS Series TVs, it appears the sharpness can be raised all the way up to 20 without any apparent detrimental effect.

(I currently have mine set to "10" but anywhere from "0-20" should be okay.)


Color

This setting adjusts the overall "Color Saturation" of the picture, and controls how bright or dull colors appear to be ("Color Intensity"). The higher the setting, the richer and more saturated the same color will appear.

Tech Note: Contrary to popular belief, the "Color" control is not actually engineered to adjust color saturation. It is a "Chroma Gain" control. Turning it up increases the Chroma of the signal. Turning it down decrease the Chroma. Although related, chroma and saturation are not exactly the same thing. "Chroma" basically means: "the colorfulness of a color relative to a similarly illuminated white."

Essentially, this setting will affect the overall "colorfulness" of the picture. It will affect the saturation of the colors, but it will also significantly affect their intensity.

Color is one of the trickiest things to get right, especially as most TVs have some sort of inherent color bias towards red or green (even in the most accurate picture mode) which means dialing up or down the "Color" control will make some colors look right while others look over- or under-saturated at the same time.

This setting is pretty accurate at "50". However, you can always raise it up a little if you enjoy more saturated, intense colors. However keep in mind that this setting equally affects all the colors at the same time; although it might improve the appearance (colorfulness) of one color, it might have a negative effect on other colors (e.g. over-saturate them) resulting in inaccurate colors.

(I currently have mine set to "50".)


Tint (G/R)

This setting adjusts the ratio of green to red.

Increase the green value to saturate the greens and the red value to saturate the reds.

(You should leave this one alone on the JS Series. It’s just fine at "50/50".)


Digital Clean View

This setting is for "Digital Noise Reduction" (DNR). It reduces static and ghosting caused by a weak signal.

This setting might improve "low resolution"/"low quality" content by helping to eliminate any excess digital noise in a picture and reduce 'flicker' caused by this. This option is primarily intended for 480i video which will generally have the most "noise" in the signal but can also be used for "low quality" 720p or 1080i content.

When you select "Auto Visualization" (only available with analog channels), the TV displays the signal strength on the bottom of the screen. Green indicates the best possible signal.

(You should leave this setting "OFF" for most content.)


MPEG Noise Filter

This setting reduces MPEG noise or artifacts often found in SD digital material.

This setting, like "Digital Clean View", might improve "low resolution"/"low quality" content by helping to eliminate any excess MPEG noise or artifacts in a picture and reduce 'flicker' caused by this.

(You should leave this setting "OFF" for most content.)


HDMI Black Level

This setting compensates for effects caused by a low black level, such as low contrasts and dull colors. It is only available (not "grayed-out") when the input signal, from a device connected to the TV via HDMI, is set to RGB.

All video discs, including Blu-rays, DVDs and Video CDs, are encoded as YCbCr which has a native "limited" color range of 16-235 (for 8-bit sources). Most HDMI devices (Blu-ray players, Satellite receivers, Cable boxes) will output a YCrCb signal. It is best to set these source components to output YCbCr not RGB.

An HDMI device that can output an RGB signal (Computer, Gaming console) can usually be set to output either a "limited" (Video level) color range of 16-235 or a "full" (PC level) color range of 0-255.

A "Full-Range" 8-bit RGB signal of 0-255 refers to the number of color variations (256) that are available in each of the Red, Green, and Blue channels (for a total of 16.78 million possible colors/shades).

For a "Limited-Range" 8-bit signal (16-235), a total 10.65 million colors/shades will be available. Note: The human eye can discriminate up to ten million distinct colors (color variations).

A 10-bit RGB signal (i.e. Deep Color) has a "Full-Range" color depth of 0-1023 (1,024 color variations available in each of the Red, Green, and Blue channels for a total of 1.07 billion possible colors/shades). For a "Limited-Range" 10-bit RGB signal (64-940), a total 674.53 million colors/shades will be available.

Note: In a Y’CbCr encoding system, the luminance information (or luma signal) is transmitted separately from the color information and a "color difference system" is used to derive green. Y′ (pronounced Y-prime) is the luma component and Cb & Cr are the blue-difference and red-difference chroma components - they are derived from B-Y’ and R-Y’. In practical application, YCbCr is no different than RGB in terms of quality.

[For more on the Y’CbCr encoding system and Chroma Subsampling, see >this post<.]

When playing back a "Limited-Range" (16-235) RGB signal (Video level), you should set "HDMI Black Level" setting to "Low" in order to match the input signal and get all the encoded information as it was intended. If you mismatch and play it back with the "Full-Range" RGB setting ("Normal"), you'll clip off the black and white levels and black will look "dark gray" (elevated blacks) and the image will appear "washed-out".

When playing back a "Full-Range" (0-255) RGB signal (PC level), you should set it to "Normal".

The "Low" setting sets the "HDMI Black Level" enhancement for a "Limited-Range" RGB input of 16-235. The "Normal" setting sets the "HDMI Black Level" enhancement for a "Full-Range" RGB input of 0-255. Note: If you are not sure which setting to choose, just leave it on "Auto".

When a YCrCb signal is detected, the "HDMI Black Level" setting will be unavailable ("grayed-out").


HDMI UHD Color

This setting optimizes processing of HDMI UHD(4K) signals up to 8 bits 50/60fps 4:4:4, or up to 10/12 bits 50/60fps 4:2:0/4:2:2 or up to 10/12-bits 24/30fps 4:4:4.

HDMI UHD Color set to "OFF" will only support 8-bit UHD(4K) input signals up to 4:2:0 at 50/60fps or up to 4:4:4 at 24/30fps.

If it is set to "ON" with a device that supports only an HD or FHD signal, there is a chance that the TV may not have the proper picture quality or sound. In this case, leave it "OFF".

This setting only applies to the HDMI inputs and is adjusted individually for each of them.

Note: This setting should be turned "ON" for the HDMI input that a UHD Blu-ray player (or UHD gaming console) is connected to, to enable the TV to accept and correctly process a 10-bit or 12-bit signal. Left "OFF", the incoming signal will be "down-converted" to 8-bits (which could result in "color banding"). FYI: UHD Blu-ray discs are encoded at 10-bit 24fps 4:2:0.


Film Mode

This setting optimizes the picture quality for 24fps film based content. However, it is only applicable for interlaced input signals (480i, 1080i) and will be "grayed-out" for a non-interlaced (progressive) input signal.

An interlaced signal needs to be "de-interlaced" into a non-interlaced form before it can be displayed on a modern digital TV, because fixed-resolution displays only support progressive scanning. However, when the two fields taken at different points in time are re-combined to a full frame displayed at once, visual defects called "interlace artifacts" or "combing artifacts" occur with moving objects in the image.

24fps film based content needs to be converted into 30fps video for TV broadcast using 3:2 pulldown technology. The TV needs to be able to detect this 3:2 pulldown sequence (or cadence) in the incoming interlaced signal in order to correctly process it, using a process called 'inverse telecine' or 'reverse pulldown' to remove the 3:2 pulldown, and de-interlace it.

"Film Mode" engages a process called 'Cadence Detection' which detects the 'cadence' used when converting 24fps film based content into 30fps video for TV broadcast. This allows the video processor in the TV to correctly process the incoming signal so that the content can be properly displayed without interlaced artifacts or loss in picture resolution. This process effectively smooths out frame transitions, minimizing 'telecine judder'.

"Film Mode" has to be turned "ON" for 3:2 pulldown 'detection' and 'correction' to work properly. It needs to be set to "Auto 1" when viewing 1080i content ("Auto 2" when viewing 480i content).


Auto Motion Plus

This setting removes blur and judder from scenes with rapid movement.

Movies and most prime-time TV shows are usually recorded at 24fps; live TV, reality TV, and sports are recorded at 30fps or 60fps. If you have a Blu-ray player that can output at 24Hz/fps, I recommend using this output setting to avoid introducing "3:2 pulldown/telecine judder" (also know as 'presentation' or 'cadence' judder). 'Telecine judder' can be corrected via 'frame-repeat' (e.g. by using 5:5 pulldown on a 120Hz LCD).

However, that said, it's important to also realize that there is a different kind of 'motion judder' that is inherent in the source - especially with content that is filmed at 24fps. This is know as "low-motion/low-framerate judder" or "film judder". Movie directors can reduce the effects of 'film judder' by changing the scene and its lighting, and by reducing extreme camera motions. However, to deal with daylight action scenes, they usually resort to adding 'motion blur' by increasing camera shutter angles or exposure times - the lower the shutter speed, the greater the motion blur.

"Auto Motion Plus" uses 'Motion-Compensated Frame Interpolation' (MCFI) to introduce additional frames between the original frames in order to increase the perceived framerate and reduce 'motion blur' and 'low-motion judder'. This, especially the "Standard" and "Smooth" settings, creates a "Soap Opera Effect" (SOE) and can also introduce undesirable visual artifacts and ghosting, and, sometimes, can even lead to an increase in 'motion judder' (e.g. 'micro stuttering'; 'playback jitter/choppiness'; 'frame skipping').

MCFI estimates motion trajectories and interpolates new images along the motion trajectories. This may yield high quality conversion if the true motion trajectories are accurately estimated and the occlusion areas caused by motion are properly processed. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to accurately estimate the true motion and to properly process motion-occluded areas.

The most advanced 'frame rate conversion' (FRC) methods use 'motion estimation' (ME), which is the process of finding corresponding points between two video frames using complex algorithms, to improve the quality of 'interpolated frames'. However, not all ME technologies are created equal.

The "Blur Reduction" setting only affect high-framerate (50/60fps) 'video-based' content while the "Judder Reduction" setting affects low-framerate (24fps) 'film-based' content.

Even though both settings make use of "motion interpolation" to reduce 'motion blur', it is the "Judder Reduction" control that causes the dreaded "Soap Opera Effect" (SOE) with 'film-based' content.

The "Blur Reduction" setting uses a picture processing technique known as 'High-Level MCFI' (Motion-Compensated Frame Interpolation), which synthesizes new frames from existing frames to reduce the hold-time thus reducing the perception of motion blur of 'high-motion' (50/60fps) content.

The "Judder Reduction" setting uses 'Low-Level MCFI' to convert 'low-motion' content (24fps) to 'high-motion' (60fps-240fps) thus creating the perception of fluid motion. As a side-effect of the increased framerate, it makes 'film-based' content (movies; prime-time TV shows) look like 'video-based' content (live TV; reality TV; sports) - it makes it look like you are watching a Soap Opera, thus the term "Soap Opera Effect".

Unless you are one of the few people who actually enjoys the dreaded "Soap Opera Effect", you should either set "Auto Motion Plus" to "OFF" or "Clear" (the lowest setting) - especially when watching prime-time TV shows or movies. The "Clear" setting helps reduce 'motion blur' without causing any apparent/noticeable SOE or visual artifacts.

The "Standard" and "Smooth" settings can reduce 'motion blur' and 'judder' in fast-paced content such as sports and certain video games.

Selecting "Custom" allows you to adjust "Blur Reduction" and "Judder Reduction" individually. Choosing "Custom" also makes available the "LED Clear Motion" option [see next entry below].

Note: It appears that in 3D mode, setting "Auto Motion Plus" to "OFF" doesn't actually disable 'MCFI'. Therefore, to completely disable all 'frame interpolation' in 3D mode, you need to choose "Custom" and set both "Blur Reduction" and "Judder Reduction" to "0".

(I set mine to "Clear" for most content.)


LED Clear Motion

Your eyes are continuously tracking moving objects on a screen. However, for sample-and-hold displays, such as LCDs and OLEDs, an image is statically displayed for the entire refresh. Your eyes are still moving during a refresh, causing the static image in one refresh to be blurred across your retina before the next refresh steps the image forward in the next frame.

"LED Clear Motion" essentially inserts 'Black Frames' between the original video frames to "reset" your retinal persistence, therefore improving motion clarity. 'BFI' is controlled by switching the backlight on and off in sync with the refresh rate. This achieves a similar effect to closing (or partially closing) the shutter on a cinema projector (or on 3D active glasses).

Although this significantly reduces perceived 'ghosting' and 'motion blur', the intrinsic nature of BFI inevitably causes a drop in screen luminance/brightness and an increase in visible 'flicker' ('strobing'). Therefore, if you turn ON "LED Clear Motion", you will need to increase your "Backlight" setting.


Smart LED

This setting controls the TV’s 'local dimming' feature. It adjusts the brightness of individual areas on the screen in order to maximize contrast automatically/dynamically, increasing the screen's "contrast ratio" and "dynamic range". It also deepens black levels considerably and helps to attenuate backlight inconsistencies and reduce clouding.

"Smart LED" adjusts the brightness of individual areas on the screen by either "boosting" or "dimming" the LEDs behind different parts of the screen. This is implemented with the help two proprietary 'software technologies' that Samsung refers to as "Precision Black" and "Peak Illuminator".

I recommend that you leave it ON. (What's the point in purchasing, and paying more for, a TV with "local dimming" if you're not going to use it?)

* On the JS9000, I recommend setting it to "High" for most HDR content.

(I have mine set to "High" on my JS9000, however, many prefer the less aggressive "Standard" setting. On the JS9500, I recommend either "Standard" or "Low".)


Cinema Black

This setting dims the top and bottom areas ("Black/Letterbox Bars") of some widescreen movies to provide a more immersive viewing experience.

Additionally, according to Samsung's Website:

"It remarkably improves black levels and quality of subtitles, and at the same time automatically adjusts the brightness level according to dark areas shown on the screen to elevate movie viewing experience... black area in the picture becomes blacker to give real dramatic effect... It provides clear and optimized video quality... [and it] enhances the picture quality with increased visibility." [For source, see Link 1 and Link 2]

(You can leave it "ON" all the time.)


Dynamic Contrast

This setting is a software based contrast enhancer that automatically or "dynamically" balances and makes adjustments to the screen contrast level (in real time) for an optimal setting.

"Dynamic Contrast" uses a processor inside the display to analyze the average, overall picture brightness and adjusts the backlight level on-the-fly. This helps render deeper blacks in predominantly dark scenes and brighter whites in mostly bright picture content.

This is very much a "preference" setting. Many "experts" recommend turning it OFF because they feel it "crushes" the blacks too much and "blows out" some of the highlights (clipped whites) - which also results in a change to the 'gamma curve'.

Nevertheless, I do find that this setting does significantly improve the picture quality of certain content by increasing the "apparent" or "perceived" contrast ratio and black levels adding more "punch" and "depth" to the picture giving it a sharper almost 3D appearance. However, keep in mind that setting "Dynamic Contrast" too high will result in a loss of detail in both bright and dark areas.

* I recommend setting it to "Medium" for most HDR content.

(I set mine to either "Medium" or "High" depending on the content being viewed.)


Black Tone

This setting enhances picture depth by adjusting/deepening black levels to "plasma-like" levels.

However, it accomplishes this by reducing dark grays to near black levels ("black crush") resulting in a loss of 'shadow detail'/'black detail', which is why most "experts" recommend turning it OFF.

I recommend that you play around with this setting, after you have finished adjusting all the other settings, to see if you prefer to have it "ON" or "OFF". (How much loss of shadow detail are you willing to live with to get those deeper blacks?) It might be best to leave it OFF when viewing a movie that has a lot of dark scenes however.

(I have mine set to "OFF")


Flesh Tone

This setting darkens or lightens skin tones.

(You can leave this one as is.)


RGB Only Mode

This setting adjusts the red, green, and blue levels individually.

(You can leave this one alone.)


Color Space

This setting adjusts the "range of colors" ('Color Gamut') that can be displayed on the screen.

Most content that you will probably be viewing on your new TV was mastered to the more narrow Rec.709 Color Space and therefore won’t really benefit from the expanded color gamut that our TVs are capable of displaying/rendering. Therefore, to display accurate colors, you should leave this setting on "Auto" for this type of content.

Setting this on "Native" when viewing content that was mastered using a narrow Rec.709 Color Space will expand the color gamut but will over-saturate some of the colors (especially the greens and the reds) making them look unnatural.

[However, if you actually enjoy the look of over-saturated colors, then go ahead and set it to "Native". However, it is important for you to understand that the colors will no longer be accurate.]

When viewing content that can take advantage of an expanded color gamut (UHD HDR content mastered using the wider Rec.2020 Color Space for instance), you should set it to "Native" [see UPDATE below].

UPDATE (August 2016): It appears that, with the latest firmware update (1460.4), the behavior of the "Auto" setting has been fixed and is now properly tracking the wider Rec.2020 Color Space. Therefore, you can now simply leave this setting on "Auto" for both SDR and HDR content.

Note: HDR content contains 'metadata' that will, in most cases, automatically switch the Color Space to a wider color gamut when this setting is set to "Auto".

[For more on "Color Space" and to learn about "Color Volume" see my post HERE]


White Balance

This setting is used to make more precise adjustments to the color temperature of the picture in order to make white objects look white and the overall picture appear natural.

It changes the overall mixture of colors in an image and is used for "color correction" in order to provide a neutral shade of white and make colors appear pleasing and as accurate as possible. In other words, adjusting the "White Balance" of an image removes unrealistic color casts, so that objects which appear white in person are rendered white on your screen.

The ability of the display to do this all the way from darkest gray to the brightest white is called "Grayscale Tracking", which is just White Balance at multiple levels of image intensity. It has to be purely black or white or a shade of grey in between. This greatly improves your display's ability to not only produce black and white accurately, but every other color in between. If the display can't do this well, then all of the colors will look very unnatural.

In order to properly calibrate your TV’s white balance, you need to optimize the red, green and blue scales at each level of brightness along the black/white spectrum (grayscale). However, these values cannot be accurately adjusted "by eye". Even the best trained eye cannot determine if the values are near 6500K as our eyes cannot accurately detect differences in the luminance of bright images such as white.

Again, as stated previously, it is not advisable to simply "copy" someone else’s settings off the internet as every TV (even the same model TV), every pair of eyes, and every viewing environment will be different. The reality is, unless you are using a color measuring meter and software, there is really no way for you to objectively know if those "copied" values are actually improving the accuracy of the overall picture, or if they are in fact making it look worse. Again, a meter must be used as our eyes are a horrible tool for measuring luminance and colors.

Therefore, unless you are professionally calibrating your TV, you should leave these adjustments alone. (If it were that simple to get a properly calibrated display, you would not need to pay a professional calibrator hundreds of dollars to come to your home and spend several hours calibrating your display using expensive calibration instruments and software.)


Gamma

This setting, formally known as "Gamma Correction", adjusts the 'middle level' of luminance and primary color intensity.

Gamma describes the light output by the screen relative to the input video signal. It basically determines the gradation of brightness on your TV - the amount of brightness for any particular level of light specified in the source.

The best way to describe how gamma affects picture quality is that gamma represents the level of brightness difference between each step in the grayscale, or how "fast" blacks get brighter. Gamma affects the steps between the darkest black and the brightest white.

Note: The human eye's sensitivity to changes in luminance is not linear. We are much more sensitive to small changes in luminance at low levels of light than we are at very high levels. In the same way, the gamma luminance response is not linear either (a 20% video is not 20% as bright as 100% video).

For most viewing, a gamma of ~2.2 (bright room) to ~2.4 (dark room) is desirable. Turning down the "Gamma Correction" control (-1 to -3) raises the gamma, while turning it up (+1 to +3) lowers the gamma.

The primary effect of gamma on image quality is with 'shadow detail'. If gamma is set too low (e.g. 2.1), you will achieve great shadow detail but your black levels will be noticeably elevated (they will turn gray) and the image will appear washed out (contrast will suffer and color intensity will decrease). If gamma is set too high (e.g. 2.5), you will create deep, dark blacks (increased contrast and color intensity) but you will lose shadow detail ('crushed blacks').

Note: HDR10 and Dolby Vision both use SMPTE ST-2084 PQ (Perceptual Quantizer) EOTF (Electro-Optical Transfer Function) which is a logarithmic-like curve that replaces the gamma curve in image encoding.

* When viewing certain HDR content (e.g. from UHD Blu-rays) you may need to raise the "Gamma Correction" control by couple of points if the picture is too dark and shadow detail is being lost into black ('crushed blacks').

(I have mine set to "0" for non-HDR content.)


Picture Size

"Picture Size" should be set to "16:9" and "Fit to screen" should be set to "ON" (not "Auto") to avoid 'over-scanning' and produced a precise 1:1 pixel map, with no cropping.

'Over-scanning' goes back to the days of CRT TVs when the scan lines that drew the image literally scanned over the edge of the viewable part of the tube. The problem with CRTs was its inability to accurately reproduce images along the edges of the tube, which was a limitation of the technology. So instead the image was over-scanned which resulted in some loss of picture but maintained quality for the center of the image - the part that mattered most.

Unfortunately, 'over-scanning' was carried over to modern TVs. The fact is that even the latest LCD and OLED TVs often don't show all the pixels out of the box. Instead about 3% of them are cropped off the edges and the remaining pixels are scaled/zoomed to fill in all the pixels of your TV.

Fortunately, there is a way to disable 'over-scan' by turning ON the "Fit to screen" option. When an image is displayed properly, it's referred as "1:1 pixel mapping". This simply means that every pixel in the signal is displayed by a single pixel on the display - you get the full image with no cropping.


Final Note

When viewing HDR content, some of these settings (e.g. "Backlight"; "Contrast"; "Color Space") will, in most cases, automatically be changed by the "HDR metadata" in order to properly display the content to the fullest capability of your TV. >These< are my recommended settings when viewing HDR content on this TV.

Once again, as I said at the beginning of this post, many of these picture settings will be a matter of personal preference. In the end, it's your TV and your eyes, so adjust it the way you want.


P.S. Be sure to check out the other LINKS in my signature below.


Richard

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post #1863 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 04:36 AM
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Anyone having "Fan Noise" issues after updating the JS9000 Firmware to 1432? Fan noise started right after the update finished.
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Running 1432.

The fan in my cable box is far noisier than the one in the OCB which is silent at more than a few inches away.

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post #1865 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 07:55 AM
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Anybody recommend a wall mount for my UN48JS9000? Not sure what kind to buy and how it will look due to the curve of the tv. Looking I guess for a "full motion" due to how bad the picture gets off center. Tv will be mounted in the bedroom and I have a chair located to the side where I sometimes watch tv. And it looks pretty bad to the side right now that I feel I might need full motion. Appreciate any advice.
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post #1866 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King Richard View Post
A lot of people seem to like these ones HERE
I am not knocking this brand of 3D glasses in any way since I have never tried them.

But I have found the $20 battery powered Samsung glasses work great and you can buy a ton of batteries for the price difference. Uses CR1620.
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post #1867 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by digitalprosf View Post
Anyone having "Fan Noise" issues after updating the JS9000 Firmware to 1432? Fan noise started right after the update finished.
I've never heard the fan actually. My PC isn't far from the TV and I can hear it slightly.
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post #1868 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary218 View Post
Anybody recommend a wall mount for my UN48JS9000? Not sure what kind to buy and how it will look due to the curve of the tv. Looking I guess for a "full motion" due to how bad the picture gets off center. Tv will be mounted in the bedroom and I have a chair located to the side where I sometimes watch tv. And it looks pretty bad to the side right now that I feel I might need full motion. Appreciate any advice.
I've had a Sanus Full Motion mount in the living room for years now. It can extend 14 inches off the wall and can swivel and tilt very easily with no tools. Very happy with it. http://www.amazon.com/Sanus-Motion-A...nt+full+motion

If you want something cheaper Monoprice sells full motion wall mounts for ~$35. I have a Monoprice wallmount in a bedroom and it works fine as well. It can hold up to 175lbs which is more than enough. http://www.monoprice.com/search/inde...20wall%20mount
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post #1869 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 03:14 PM
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Everyone's settings are nice to try but they are hearsay. Get a Spyder and it is done right. You all bought a 2+ grand TV do it justice.


Calibrated I find it over all better than OLED and JS9500. I extensively tried all three in my home. I have no back light issues or anything else wrong. The picture is stunning but messing with the settings can mess it up bad.


Solely calibrated I find this the best overall TV of 2015. Messing with the settings may be many peoples issue. You need to properly calibrate any display. You will need a hardware tool for that. It is not too expensive and you should be very thankful you did so.
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post #1870 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TriTon464 View Post
Everyone's settings are nice to try but they are hearsay. Get a Spyder and it is done right. You all bought a 2+ grand TV do it justice.


Calibrated I find it over all better than OLED and JS9500. I extensively tried all three in my home. I have no back light issues or anything else wrong. The picture is stunning but messing with the settings can mess it up bad.



Solely calibrated I find this the best overall TV of 2015. Messing with the settings may be many peoples issue. You need to properly calibrate any display. You will need a hardware tool for that. It is not too expensive and you should be very thankful you did so.

How do the Sypders work? I know nothing about them.
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post #1871 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TriTon464 View Post
Everyone's settings are nice to try but they are hearsay. Get a Spyder and it is done right. You all bought a 2+ grand TV do it justice.

Calibrated I find it over all better than OLED and JS9500. I extensively tried all three in my home. I have no back light issues or anything else wrong. The picture is stunning but messing with the settings can mess it up bad.

Solely calibrated I find this the best overall TV of 2015. Messing with the settings may be many peoples issue. You need to properly calibrate any display. You will need a hardware tool for that. It is not too expensive and you should be very thankful you did so.

Not really sure if your post was a response to my post or to cmdrdredd's post (or both, or neither)

... but I'd like to make a few comments nonetheless.


YES, I totally agree with you that people should get their expensive TVs professionally calibrated if they truly want the best, most accurate picture possible. (Whether they purchase the calibration tools and learn how to do the calibration themselves, or pay a "professional" to do it for them.)

At the very least, they should probably purchase/download a "Calibration DVD".

However, the reality is that over 95% of the people who purchase these expensive TVs will never end up paying to have their TVs professionally calibrated.

That's just a fact.

I also agree that simply "copying" someone else's settings is not really advisable. As I said in my previous post:

"It is not advisable to simply “copy” someone else’s settings off the internet as every TV (even the same model TV), every pair of eyes, and every viewing environment will be different. You can always use someone else's calibration settings as a starting point (as long as the TV model is the same), however, his settings won't look the same on your TV (although they might be close)."

... however, I still believe it can be a good "starting point" though. (At least it's better than nothing.)

... plus, as I also stated, these 'recommendations' do not account for such things as "personal preference".

For instance, many/most 'experts' usually recommend setting the "Sharpness" control to '0' and completely turning off all advanced special features such as "Dynamic Contrast", "Black Tone", "Cinema Black", and even "Smart LED" (which is the setting that controls the 'local dimming' function of the TV).

How many people (even regulars on this forum) do you think actually follow that advice? (I don't)

So yes, I do agree that, in an ideal world, everybody would have professionally calibrated TVs...

... but that's just never going to happen.

Just sayin'



Richard

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post #1872 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by digitalprosf View Post
Anyone having "Fan Noise" issues after updating the JS9000 Firmware to 1432? Fan noise started right after the update finished.

I haven't received the 1432 firmware update yet (still on 1422) but my OCB has always been "whisper quiet".

I hope it doesn't start making noise after the 1432 update.

I'm sorry to hear that yours is.

Richard

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post #1873 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 08:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary218 View Post
Anybody recommend a wall mount for my UN48JS9000? Not sure what kind to buy and how it will look due to the curve of the tv. Looking I guess for a "full motion" due to how bad the picture gets off center. Tv will be mounted in the bedroom and I have a chair located to the side where I sometimes watch tv. And it looks pretty bad to the side right now that I feel I might need full motion. Appreciate any advice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmdrdredd View Post
I've had a Sanus Full Motion mount in the living room for years now. It can extend 14 inches off the wall and can swivel and tilt very easily with no tools. Very happy with it. http://www.amazon.com/Sanus-Motion-A...nt+full+motion

I also have a Sanus Full Motion wall mount but a different one than the one "cmdrdredd" has.

Here's the one I have:

Premium Series Full-Motion Mount for 51" - 70" flat-panel TVs

I love it.

It is very easy to install. Very sturdy and solidly built.

Swivels 90 degrees, tilts 15 degrees, and extends up to 25"

However, it is for 51" to 70" TVs (up to 125lbs)

Even if it did fit your 48" TV, it probably would be "overkill".

But I definitely would look at other Sanus models though.

Richard
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post #1874 of 4125 Old 12-16-2015, 09:06 PM
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I have found the $20 battery powered Samsung glasses work great and you can buy a ton of batteries for the price difference. Uses CR1620.

Those are the ones I use as well (they are $30 in Canada though).

I have 3 pairs (and several spare batteries).

I also have 2 pairs of Sony 3D glasses that I got free from someone who was not using them.

(They do work with the Samsung TV. I like the Samsung ones better though.)

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post #1875 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 12:36 AM
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Received 1440 update . No change in picture. Tizen is a bit slower and new multi link interface.
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post #1876 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 01:05 AM
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Received 1440 update . No change in picture. Tizen is a bit slower and new multi link interface.

I just received update 1440.4 as well.

Weird, I went directly from update 1422 to 1440.4 (never got 1432).

I don't know if anything changed yet.

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post #1877 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 05:12 AM
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Quote:
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I haven't received the 1432 firmware update yet (still on 1422) but my OCB has always been "whisper quiet".

I hope it doesn't start making noise after the 1432 update.

I'm sorry to hear that yours is.

Richard
I think it's quieted down after a couple restarts, OCB has been silent the last 3 firmware updates and now the fan noise is there. OCB is in it's original position on the back of the TV so there's now chance of location causing the noise. Who knows maybe Samsung up'd the performance or changed the speed of the fan?
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post #1878 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 08:45 AM
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***OFFICIAL** 2015 Samsung 4K SUHD JS9000 Series Curved Smart TV Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by TriTon464 View Post
Everyone's settings are nice to try but they are hearsay. Get a Spyder and it is done right. You all bought a 2+ grand TV do it justice.


Calibrated I find it over all better than OLED and JS9500. I extensively tried all three in my home. I have no back light issues or anything else wrong. The picture is stunning but messing with the settings can mess it up bad.


Solely calibrated I find this the best overall TV of 2015. Messing with the settings may be many peoples issue. You need to properly calibrate any display. You will need a hardware tool for that. It is not too expensive and you should be very thankful you did so.

Yeah but most people will never calibrate a tv. They will find some settings that look good to their eyes and they will call it a day. After all they are the ones watching it, not the ISF guy who is doing the calibration. What is "correct" isn't always what is preferred.

I took the settings from rtings.com and adjusted a few things to preference and it looked good enough to me and anyone else who has watched the tv. It's more than most people buying the set would do, they will probably set it to standard and maybe turn off the Eco settings.

Samsung 55JS9000, Denon AVR-X2200w 5.1.2, PS4 Pro, Gaming PC(SLI 970s), Philips BDP7501 UHD Player, Nvidia Shield TV
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post #1879 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 11:12 AM
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You guys are right but I find it unfortunate. I don't know why people buy things and do not get the most of them. Other than breaking the law most people that buy a Porsche never drive it like it could be used. Or even get a Gaming computer and do not max it out. Just my feelings. Everyone can do as they please of course.
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post #1880 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
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Yeah but most people will never calibrate a tv. They will find some settings that look good to their eyes and they will call it a day. After all they are the ones watching it, not the ISF guy who is doing the calibration. What is "correct" isn't always what is preferred.
Here is why we should adjust our own TVs and not feel that we're settling for something 2nd rate. Suppose the TV is showing some scene which actually has a range of brightnesses from 0 to 1000 nits. The 709 standard requires that be reduced to a range from 0 to 100, regardless what the TV camera can record, so camera and colorists reduce that 0-1000 range to 0-100. If you have a TV that can only display 0-100 nits, that's exactly what you want. The signal has a dynamic range of 0-100 nits and you want your TV calibrated to correctly display that signal.

But suppose you have an HDR-ready TV that can display 0-1000 nits. There are two things you can do:

(1) Pay for an ISF calibrator to come adjust your TV so that it has a dynamic range of 0-100 nits to match the 709 standard and, presumably, the dynamic range in the 709 signal you want to display.

(2) Adjust it yourself, by eye, to approximate the peak brightness of 1000 nits that was in the original scene.

Well, it's obvious, isn't it? Why hobble your TV to an outdated standard when this makes it reproduce scenes less faithfully?

Actually, calibrators usually don't set up your TV for a peak white value of 100 nits, because that doesn't look very good. They'll choose a slightly higher value, perhaps 120 nits, but they probably feel rather guilty doing that, because it's not the "standard".

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post #1881 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 08:54 PM
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GreggLee I am not sure if you are for or against it? brightness has a little wiggle room. Color related adjustment should be per the standards. I bet if someone watched a calibrated display for a few movies they will prefer it to what they did no the fly. I had flash lighting and ghosting too. I cannot see the backlight at 18 inches. A TV of this caliber should not do that even though it is edge lit. I still find it better than the FALD 9500 as does Rtings.


The JS9000 is a high end set. That is why I think the Spyder is a fair investment. You could always put it your way and return it. You really have nothing to lose. I am just banking anyone without a calibration ends up happier with it. If you like it and keep it, it is less money than a pro. I have nothing to do with that company. I don't even use one. I have an expensive puck for my Eizo displays. The Spyder is all that is needed for this application though. I am just trying to help you guys have the best experience possible.
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post #1882 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 09:54 PM
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Sorry if this is a duplicate question but any new JS9000 owner here experienced the infamous light bleed at the lower corners that the sibling JS8500 have recently?
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post #1883 of 4125 Old 12-17-2015, 11:47 PM
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Wow, Another Software update in less than a week. (1440)

I can see it on the TV, but it won't let me update.
Hopefully it's added to Sumsung.com soon.
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post #1884 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 02:24 AM
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Quote:
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Sorry if this is a duplicate question but any new JS9000 owner here experienced the infamous light bleed at the lower corners that the sibling JS8500 have recently?

None that I've seen or heard about.

Mine doesn't have any.

Richard
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post #1885 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 04:32 AM
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Another firmware update last night (1440), 4 firmware updates in 2 months of owning the JS9000, this is scary.
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post #1886 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TriTon464 View Post
GreggLee I am not sure if you are for or against it? brightness has a little wiggle room. Color related adjustment should be per the standards.
By "it" you mean the Spyder? I think instruments are a very nice thing, in general, provided you do the right things with them. If adjustment to a standard increases the fidelity of the picture to the original scenes, that's great. But if a standard keeps you from exploiting your TV's capabilities for showing you a life-like picture, that standard is not useful. That's all I'm saying. I don't know much about adjusting white balance or color gamut, and I haven't said anything about that.

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post #1887 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 07:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinmscs View Post
Sorry if this is a duplicate question but any new JS9000 owner here experienced the infamous light bleed at the lower corners that the sibling JS8500 have recently?
Not a new owner but, I have seen blue light bleed on a BB floor model. I have a feeling its much less common though.
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post #1888 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by digitalprosf View Post
Another firmware update last night (1440), 4 firmware updates in 2 months of owning the JS9000, this is scary.
why is it scary? would you prefer no updates at all?
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post #1889 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 07:59 AM
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Hi all, I am new and I own the 65" 9000 from just one and half month.
I have an issue with the clouding and I am not happy at all. I have a cloud near the upper left corner and near the bottom right corner. It's possibile that the clouding starts to show now? I can see these with all the possible picture settings and, more annoying, I can see this during dark scenes of the movies.
I can try to fix this or try to return the tv?
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post #1890 of 4125 Old 12-18-2015, 08:01 AM
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why is it scary? would you prefer no updates at all?
Not all firmware updates are adding new features, it's just patching what they screwed up from the previous release.

Last edited by digitalprosf; 12-22-2015 at 04:55 AM.
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