Samsung One Connect Cable Splicing? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 15 Old 01-20-2017, 08:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Samsung One Connect Cable Splicing?

Hello,

I recently purchased a Samsung UN55KS8000F, and mounted it on the wall. This unit comes with the Samsung One Connect Box (OCB), which is Part # BN91-17814W, and connects to the TV with the Samsung One Connect Cable.

I have the TV mounted on the wall, with a hole directly behind it leading to a conduit that runs down to the floor, inside the wall, which allows for a completely hidden, in-the-wall cable. The conduit running inside the wall is about 3/4" in diameter, which makes it plenty big enough for the cable itself, but not the connector at the ends, which are large and flat, and measure over 1 1/4" across. So, there is no way to pass one of the ends down through the wall.

I was thinking that I could cut off one of the ends, feed the cable down, then splice the connector back on once it's through. But I wanted to ask the community here, before I go ruining a $100 cable with an experiment that might not even work.

Thoughts?
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post #2 of 15 Old 01-20-2017, 09:33 PM
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Here's a link to splicing HDMI cables. How to make your own HDMI Cables. It looks like there are 19 conductors in an HDMI cable and a nosebleed to do. I would think the One Connect cable is probably harder to splice.
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post #3 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 01:47 AM
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Do these expensive HDMI cables really make a difference
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post #4 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 01:49 AM
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And if so, is there any proven ones the people can recommend.

Thanks
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post #5 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DW2 View Post
Hello,

I recently purchased a Samsung UN55KS8000F, and mounted it on the wall. This unit comes with the Samsung One Connect Box (OCB), which is Part # BN91-17814W, and connects to the TV with the Samsung One Connect Cable.

I have the TV mounted on the wall, with a hole directly behind it leading to a conduit that runs down to the floor, inside the wall, which allows for a completely hidden, in-the-wall cable. The conduit running inside the wall is about 3/4" in diameter, which makes it plenty big enough for the cable itself, but not the connector at the ends, which are large and flat, and measure over 1 1/4" across. So, there is no way to pass one of the ends down through the wall.

I was thinking that I could cut off one of the ends, feed the cable down, then splice the connector back on once it's through. But I wanted to ask the community here, before I go ruining a $100 cable with an experiment that might not even work.

Thoughts?
I wouldn't attempt to splice an HDMI cable. It can be done but it's a real pain. And given the issues that folks are having running the higher video standards (4:4:4 @60Hz), there is no room at all for error. It's too bad that you already installed your conduit. 1.5" - 2.0" is what is recommended.

How long is your run? I don't have a Samsung tv with the OCB so I'm not familiar with the OCB cable. Is it "regular" HDMI cable (RJ-45 connectors on both ends)? If so, you could fish a solid core, 24AWG, CAT-6a cable (non-CCS and NOT a CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) down the conduit and then connect either end with keystone jack that you could then attach a regular CAT-6a ethernet patch cable to your devices. I would certainly lay all of that out on the floor first and thoroughly test it before fishing down the conduit.
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post #6 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 09:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi all,
Thanks for the responses.

Peja--
thanks for the link. Yes, it does seem complicated, but maybe not as complicated as that link? I'm just separating and then putting back together, not trying to make the cable/connector from scratch. Maybe this wouldn't be as painful?

fern010--
This is not an HDMI cable. It's a proprietary Samsung cable that only works/connects the TV set to the One Connect Box (which has various inputs). So far, I have not seen any difference other than the OCB allows for only 1 cable hanging down from a wall-mounted TV, as opposed to several.

Otto Pylot--
Thanks for the response. It's not an HDMI cable only, I guess it's just a kind of "all-in-one" data cable. The run is not long (maybe 5 feet max) and the standard One Connect cable that comes with the TV is plenty long enough. It's really just a matter of the connector (and yes, the conduit had to be small, and unfortunately I didn't know what TV I was getting when the wall was built).
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post #7 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 01:51 PM
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Hmmm, without widening the conduit, which would be the best solution and obviously the most difficult, I can't think of another way to do that other than purchasing another OCB cable or two and experiment with splicing. Could you build a little shelf in the wall behind the tv that you could mount the OCB box in? Not necessarily flat but maybe upright, just a tad bit deeper than the OCB is tall. Is there a way to mount the OCB flat against the wall behind the tv or on the back of the panel itself? Anyway to attach it to the tv mount?

This issue with wall mounted Samsung's and the OCBs have come up before. It's one of the reason that I'm not a fan of wall mounting tv's.
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post #8 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 02:31 PM
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With a 3/4" conduit you're not going to get much through it from either direction. Is the wall behind the TV an interior wall? Is "the hole in the wall" behind the tv actually a hole or a box in the wall with a conduit coming out of it? What kind of opening in the wall at the bottom? Was the conduit installed during construction/remodel? Interior walls generally don't have fire blocks inside and are open floor to ceiling if no plumbing/gas exists from the other side of wall. It's pretty simple to "fish" wires down a wall. Exterior walls are not easy and usually require some repair skills.
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post #9 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peja View Post
With a 3/4" conduit you're not going to get much through it from either direction. Is the wall behind the TV an interior wall? Is "the hole in the wall" behind the tv actually a hole or a box in the wall with a conduit coming out of it? What kind of opening in the wall at the bottom? Was the conduit installed during construction/remodel? Interior walls generally don't have fire blocks inside and are open floor to ceiling if no plumbing/gas exists from the other side of wall. It's pretty simple to "fish" wires down a wall. Exterior walls are not easy and usually require some repair skills.
A conduit can be installed in an inside wall with only a hole cut for the junction box by a qualified electrician or someone who knows what they are doing. We did exactly that when I wanted to run solid core CAT-6 from my router in one room to the family room so I could hardwire the HTS without having to depend on WiFi. If you add a pull string you can easily add other cables as your needs change. The run is about 75' (up one wall, across the attic space, and down another wall). Works perfectly. You just need to be mindful of bend radius and pulling the OCB cable thru because you don't want to put too much pulling pressure on the connector ends. You could safely add a little weight to one end of the cable to help it drop straighter and faster down the conduit. I'm not a fan of installing HDMI cables in-wall for that very reason.
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post #10 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
A conduit can be installed in an inside wall with only a hole cut for the junction box by a qualified electrician or someone who knows what they are doing. We did exactly that when I wanted to run solid core CAT-6 from my router in one room to the family room so I could hardwire the HTS without having to depend on WiFi. If you add a pull string you can easily add other cables as your needs change. The run is about 75' (up one wall, across the attic space, and down another wall). Works perfectly. You just need to be mindful of bend radius and pulling the OCB cable thru because you don't want to put too much pulling pressure on the connector ends. You could safely add a little weight to one end of the cable to help it drop straighter and faster down the conduit. I'm not a fan of installing HDMI cables in-wall for that very reason.
+1. His install is only from TV viewing height to the floor. I'd be surprised if it's six feet in the wall, probably less. On an interior wall it's really simple to pull (really just drop) the OCB cable that far. Total cost $0. A botched cable splice is $$. IMO in this case KISS prevails.
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post #11 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 06:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Yeah, I'm not too worried about getting the cable through, I'm more concerned with how to get the huge connector off and back on (well, I guess the off part is pretty easy.... )

Maybe a place like this would have a solution?
https://www.cables.com/Custom-Cables.aspx

(and as for the wall, it's a solid -- concrete/plaster -- interior wall in an apartment in NYC, pre-war building. so yes, very brick-and-morter. the conduit itself was installed during construction, yes, and is finished with wall plates just as a standard outlet is)

(edit: oh, and as for botched cable splices, it seems they go for about $100. I remember seing one retailer selling it for $76, but that place looked sketchy...)
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post #12 of 15 Old 01-21-2017, 09:44 PM
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Concrete/plaster walls are no fun. You're stuck there. How much of the OCB cable would be exposed on the wall between the bottom of the TV and any cabinet or rack below? Obviously not optimal but if the only cable is the OCB a small length of narrow trim painted the wall color might work. I wouldn't like to settle for it but it might better than chopping up $100 cables. I have a pretty good dose of OCD so I feel for you.
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post #13 of 15 Old 01-22-2017, 04:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Haha, thanks for feeling my pain, Peja!
Yes, the whole point is to have no cables or anything on the exterior of the wall. But it seems like a careful cutting and then re-attaching job is the only way......
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post #14 of 15 Old 01-27-2017, 08:28 AM
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I share Peja's OCD on the OCB and have almost the exact same problem (even posted unaware of your thread, DW2) needing to run the OC through an interior wall to above-fireplace niche from cabinet at floor level to the side. You are running through the exact same thought process as me - why wouldn't this be like pinning out an old-school data cable to a connector assembly. I planned for running HDMI cables to TV in my remodel... but not these bonkers One Connect cables. I'm also of the "buy a short cable and see if you can splice it longer successfully" mindset, unless I get some other epiphany (mine or anybody's!). I need less than 15' but more than 10'. There's a slight chance I could cut a corner and bypass the splice need, but in that case I might want to wrap the cable in some kind of fire-rated sleeve.
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post #15 of 15 Old Today, 11:15 AM
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I have a similar situation but the conduit I have in my wall is about 1.25" maybe 1.5" wide so the cable should fit. However since the conduit is one of those orange plastic tubes is that sufficient enough to run the one connect cable through there? Meaning will that cover the whole in-wall fire rating issue?
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