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post #1 of 62 Old 05-24-2006, 02:44 PM - Thread Starter
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This thread is for news about technological advancements in LCD TVs and LCD technology in general. It will be regularly updated with relevant news about leading-edge advancements in such areas as:
▪ Backlighting
▪ Contrast Ratio / Black Level
▪ Resolution
▪ Size
▪ Response Speed
▪ Chipset & I/O Design
In particular, this thread is intended to become an ongoing record of the state of the art in LCD technology.

Other threads in this group on the AVS Forum:
LCD TVs: Fab News Thread
LCD TVs: Market Price Stats Thread

Plasma TVs: Market Decline Thread

OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread
TDEL TVs: Technology Advancements Thread --------------------------------------

SAMSUNG Launches Largest LCD On The Market; Lights The Way For Next-Gen Displays With First-Ever LCD HDTV With An LED Back Light
6 January 2005




57 LNR570D is Largest Built-in HDTV LCD Available Today; CES Innovations Awards Honor LNR460D Widescreen HDTV LCD with LED Back Light and LNR409D Widescreen HDTV LCD with Flat Fluorescent Lamp

Las Vegas, NV - Samsung Electronics America, Inc., a world leader in display technology and innovation, launches the LCD market to the next level with its most ambitious LCD TV line ever. Anchored by the world's largest high-definition LCD TV, the 1080p 57 LNR570D Widescreen LCD HDTV, the new line also features two CES Innovations Award-winning products: the 46 LNR460D, which employs the very first LCD HDTV LED backlight, and the 40 LNR409D, the first LCD to feature a Flat Fluorescent Lamp. Samsung's not-to-be-missed LCD TV line will be on display during CES 2005 in the Samsung booth, #11024 in the Central Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center from January 6th - 9th.

Samsung is known for it's LCD innovation, and the advanced production techniques at our world's-first Generation 7 LCD fabrication facility have produced a line of LCDs that are unparalleled in performance, said Jonas Tanenbaum, Senior Marketing Manager of Flat Panel and Direct View Products for Samsung Electronics America. Samsung is taking a lead in not only making large LCD screens more affordable, but in pushing the size and technology envelopes to give consumers to the best performing, most enhanced picture solutions available today.

The 57 LNR570D Widescreen LCD HDTV reinforces Samsung's technology leadership with a host of features that make the set a must-have for the A/V elite. The largest consumer LCD HDTV on the market, the LNR570D features a built-in ATSC Tuner, Cable CARD and state-of-the-art video reproduction capabilities. True high resolution with 1920 x 1080 progressive scanning displays today's digital video in stunning 6.2-million pixel clarity. With high brightness (600cd), a high response time (faster than 8ms) and a contrast ratio greater than 1000:1, the top-of-the-line LCD HDTV offers matchless color precision and video playback that is smooth without blurring.

The outstanding 176 degree H/V viewing angle ensures picture perfect entertainment from anywhere in the room. For added performance and convenience, the LNR570D features Samsung's patented, proprietary DNIe technology for superior picture and Samsung AnyNet for home networking. A sleek, modern design makes the set the ideal centerpiece in any setting requiring ultra-high resolution, from the living room to the boardroom. The LNR570D Widescreen LCD HDTV will be available in June 2005 for an MSRP of $15,999.

The 46 LNR460D Widescreen LCD HDTV with LED Back Light cements Samsung's status at the forefront of the high-end home theater market. An Innovations Award Honoree, the LNR460D is the world's first LCD HDTV to feature the LED back light unit. This innovation provides outstanding color reproduction beyond that of a conventional LCD panel. Samsung's new screen technology results in a significantly increased NTSC color gamut (105%, compared with 72% for typical fluorescent backlit LCD TVs.) This expanded color range along with high brightness (500cd), a high contrast ratio (greater than 1000:1) and the ultimate resolution (1920 x 1080p) provide show-stopping image vividness and stunning detail. A large 170-degree H/V viewing angle makes the LNR460D a true home-theater masterpiece. The LNR460D Widescreen LCD HDTV with LED Back Light will be available in May 2005 for an MSRP of $12,999.

Samsung's 40 LNR409D Widescreen LCD HDTV, also an Innovations Award Honoree, makes history as the first LCD to feature a Flat Fluorescent Lamp (FFL) Back Light Unit. Developed in a joint effort between Samsung and Corning Ltd., the FFL enhances brightness and light uniformity. Featuring a new 40 S-PVA (Super Patterned Vertical Alignment) panel, the LNR409D provides a best-in-class 3000:1 contrast ratio and the widest gradation of colors available in an LCD (3.2 billion) to deliver a breathtaking picture over a wide color range. A built-in ATSC digital TV tuner and a cable card slot render along with Samsung's AnyNetä technology provides convenient home theater networking. The LNR409D Widescreen LCD HDTV with Flat Fluorescent Lamp will be available in May 2005 for an MSRP of $5,999.

Samsung completes its line of high-end LCD televisions with the 40 LNR408D LCD HDTV and the 32 LNR328W Widescreen LCD HDTV Monitor. Both models feature 3000:1 dynamic contrast ratios (the highest available in an LCD) and a fast response time (12ms) for superb picture playback and color vibrancy on a 16:9 screen. The LNR408D Widescreen LCD HDTV will be available in July 2005 for an MSRP of $5,499. The LNR328W Widescreen LCD HDTV Monitor will be available in May 2005 for an MSRP of $2,999.

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Top LCD maker bets research on LED backlights
21 September 2005

AU Optronics, the world's third largest maker of LCD (liquid crystal display) screens, is aiming most of its research dollars at LED (light emitting diode) technology for its sharper contrasts and brighter colors, an executive at the company said Tuesday.

The Taiwanese company is already providing 23-inch LCD screens with LED backlights to a major Japanese customer for the LCD-TV market. Backlighting helps create contrast on LCD screens by illuminating the background so that the foreground appears sharper.

We have worked very diligently with LED makers on these television displays, said Po-Yen Lu, an executive vice president at AU, during a meeting with news media.

Although LED backlighting costs a bit more than mainstream backlighting, Lu said its better contrast and motion picture color quality has won it a following among some customers. The backlight technology probably won't become widespread until the company is able to double its production capacity and slash the price per screen by half, he said.

The company is also working with OLED (organic LED) screens for smaller devices, mainly mobile phones and digital cameras. The company is already marketing 2-inch and 2.4-inch OLED screens for mobile phones, as well as a 2-inch screen for digital still cameras.

AU has no current plans to research carbon nanotubes because it will take a long time for the technology to become commercialized, Lu said.

OLED technology competes with LCD technology in many markets, but mainly in smaller devices since OLED screens use less power, enabling batteries to last longer.

During the second quarter, shipments of OLED panels grew 82 percent compared to last year to 14.2 million units and revenue hit US$124.8 million, according to market researcher DisplaySearch. The popularity of MP3 players is boosting OLEDs the most, the company said.

By contrast, LCD maintained its huge lead on other display technologies in the second quarter, as LCD monitor revenue alone rose to US$7.7 billion in the second quarter, DisplaySearch said.

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Westinghouse Digital Showcases First Ultra High Resolution 56-inch LCD at CES 2006
5 January 2006




CES 2006, LVCC South Hall, Booth #26430 - Westinghouse Digital Electronics, one of the top five LCD TV manufacturers in the U.S.*, will demonstrate the world's largest ultra high resolution LCD, a 56-inch LCD featuring eight million pixels with a resolution of 3840x2160four times the highest HDTV resolution currently availableas well as showcase its latest product innovations in the Las Vegas Convention Center, South Hall, booth #26430, Jan. 5-8, 2006.
The 56-inch panel features:
? 3840x2160 resolution, four times 1080pthe highest resolution currently available for HDTVor eight million pixels.

? Industry-leading 8-millisecond response time delivers clear images for fast action in motion video games, movies and sports.

? Ultra-bright 600-nit display and 1000:1 contrast ratio deliver vivid colors and bright images even in harsh lighting conditions.

? Advanced color gamut to display the broadest possible range of color.
Westinghouse Digital will be the first to commercially introduce an LCD with this resolution in the U.S. It will enable high-end applications in fields including government, military, aerospace, medical and digital content creation. Other high-end applications include multifunction home entertainment systems, connection to high quality digital still and video cameras, and high-end specialty uses for high-resolution graphic displays such as medical video cameras or satellite picture displays.

This is the world's highest resolution LCD and demonstrates Westinghouse Digital's leadership in bringing technological innovations to market, said Richard Houng, CEO of Westinghouse Digital Electronics. We will be the first to commercialize an LCD display with this resolution.

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SAMSUNG Electronics Shines A New Light On LCD - Unveils World's First 82" LCD TV With LED Backlight
5 January 2006




LAS VEGAS - January 5, 2006 - Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the leading producer of televisions worldwide, today unveils a 82" LCD TV with LED backlight - the world's largest of its kind - here at CES 2006. This new model offers dramatically improved performance and viewing angle while decreasing thickness and power usage.

The 82" LCD TV with LED backlight (model LN-S8297DE) enlarges the color reproduction area by more than 33 percent compared to conventional LCD TVs. Dynamic Contrast technology, Samsung's proprietary contrast enhancement technology, allows for a high contrast ratio of 7000:1. In addition, the LN-S8297DE is a next-generation, environment-friendly product that does not use mercury.

This new model provides TV viewers with a clear view from virtually every viewing angle, solving a long-running problem with LCD screens. At the same time, it is thinner and consumes less power than other conventional LCD TVs with LED backlight. Moreover, Samsung's exclusive LCD TV circuit technology eliminates the need for a cooling fan, which can pull dust into the TV and creates noise.

"Samsung's LCD leadership goes beyond our ability to offer the world's largest display panels - we constantly strive to improve every aspect of the home entertainment experience," said Sang-heung Shin, VP of Marketing for Samsung's Visual Display division. "This advanced LCD technology with LED backlight improves viewing angle and color reproduction area, while simultaneously decreasing thickness and power usage. These innovations will help Samsung to strengthen its position as a leader in digital TVs."

Providing the highest visual quality, Samsung's 82" LCD TV with LED backlight supports full HD (1920x1080p) is equipped with Samsung's DNIe chip, which enhances picture quality for the best performance in the industry. This new Samsung LCD TV also has a fast response time of 8ms.

The audio quality of the Samsung 82" LCD TV with LED backlight is unsurpassed. The TV comes with SRS Trusurround XT, reproducing 6.1 channel sound and Dolby Digital.

In addition, the built-in HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) ensures that images and sounds from digital set-top boxes are reproduced without picture quality loss.

Price and availability are not yet determined

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The world's most advanced LCD TV - 56-inch and 3840 x 2160 pixels
24 February 2006




Taiwanese Chi Mei Optoelectronics is a name you may not know, despite the company being the third largest LCD TV panel supplier in the world. At CEBIT in Hannover in mid-March, the company will display the world's first 56-inch LCD TV panel. Perhaps more startling than the size of the mega-telly is the definition which is known as Quad Full High Definition (QFHD) with a resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels and an astonishing 8.29 million pixels.

The new panel features resolution that is four times that of currently available products (1920 x 1080), and the highest ever achieved. The new panel consists of over 24.8 million units of transistors, with a data transmission speed of over 1.4 gigabytes per second.

To achieve this breakthrough result, the Chi Mei Optoelectronics research and development team overcame a number of significant technical challenges, including the development of special new driver methods and scanning procedures and solving massive heat generation problems caused by the alignment of so many transistors.

The company points out that the technical challenges were not only in developing a larger sized LCD panel, but also in developing the 4x increase in screen resolution.

In the future, LCD screen size alone will no longer be the technical threshold nor the development focus of display panel makers, said Chi Mei Optoelectronics President Mr. Jau-Yang Ho. From now on, all LCD manufacturers must shift to increasing the consumer experience on LCD display by using greater screen resolution and more advanced technology, he said.

Chi Mei Optoelectronics believes that display data load will increase exponentially, due both to technology development and the continuing convergence of 3C (computer, communication and consumer electronics) trends. As a result, demand for displays with high-speed data processing capabilities will also increase dramatically.

Chi Mei Optoelectronics' new flagship 56-inch LCD panels can be applied in a number of high-end applications. They will be perfect for ultra high-end multi-functional home entertainment systems, in which they can provide consumers the superior performance of digital TV and to connect with high quality digital still and video cameras, to provide consumers with luxurious home theater experience. Alternately, the 56-inch QFHD displays can be applied in high-end specialty uses for high-resolution graphic display such as in medical video camera or satellite picture displays.

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SAMSUNG Develops World's Largest (82) Full HDTV TFT-LCD
7 March 2005




Samsung Electronics, the leading provider of TFT-LCD display panels, announced that it has developed the world's largest 82-inch TFT-LCD. This full HD image quality TFT-LCD panel was developed at the company's new production complex in Tangjeong, Korea. The soon-to-be operational 7th-generation production facility uses glass substrates that measure 1.87m x 2.20m.

Samsung has made a series of breakthroughs in TFT-LCD technology ahead of the competition over the years. The company developed the first 40-inch model in August 2001, the first 46-inch panel in October 2002, the first 57-inch model in December 2003 and now the first 82-inch panel.

At its 7th-generation Line 7-1, Samsung can produce two 82-inch panels from a single substrate. Previously, technological limitations prevented the development of LCDs of this size and competitive technologies, such as PDP and DLP technologies, were used to produce such large-sized panels.

Samsung's latest large-screen TFT-LCD offers a variety of features. The company applied its patented Super Patterned-ITO Vertical Alignment (S-PVA) technology to achieve extra-wide viewing angles. In addition, the product boasts a low-dispersion color filter and ultra high aperture ratio, achieving a contrast ratio of at least 1200:1 and brightness of 600nit (cd/m2). Response times are at 8ms or faster, providing clear moving picture images. A high-color-saturation backlight raises color saturation to 92% to produce a premium image quality.

Sang Soo Kim, Senior Vice President and Head of the LCD Development Center, states, Our 82-inch LCD panel proves Samsung Electronics' technological leadership. It uses our proprietary S-PVA technology, eliminating distortion from all angles and offers a 180-degree viewing angle. With this panel, we have achieved the world's best performance in terms of contrast ratio, viewing angle and color saturation.

Samsung is set to begin operations at the world's first 7th-generation TFT-LCD production line at Tangjeong, Korea. This facility can be used to produce the company's full line-up of LCD modules for TV: from 23-inch (24 per substrate), 26-inch (18 per substrate) and 32-inch (12 per substrate) to 40-inch (8 per substrate) and 46-inch (6 per substrate).

Samsung Electronics is at least one year ahead of the competition in terms of using 7 th -generation production technology to make modules of 40 inches, 46 inches and 57 inches. It is therefore in a position to take an early lead in the fast-growing market for large-screen, wall-hanging TVs.

The development of the 82-inch TFT-LCD marks the smooth launch of Samsung's and Sony's joint venture in S-LCD. The 7th-generation line will begin mass production at the end of March.

Samsung Electronics will unveil its 82-inch TFT-LCD at CeBIT 2005, which opens in Hannover, Germany on March 10.

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LG.Philips Develops 100-Inch LCD
8 March 2006



Models demonstrate the world's largest 100-inch liquid crystal display panel made by
LG.Philips LCD at an unveiling ceremony at the firm's plant in Paju, Kyonggi Province, Wednesday.


LG.Philips LCD Wednesday took the wraps off a 100-inch thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panel, which the company claims is the largest in the world.

The model developed by the world's runner-up LCD producer is about 1.5 times bigger than the previously largest 82-inch product of Samsung Electronics, the global top player.

Our development of the 100-inch LCD panel reaffirms LG.Philips LCD is the global leader in large-area LCD technology,'' the firm's vice president Yeo Sang-deog said.

Technological advances for large-area LCD TVs, such as the 100-inch LCD, will act as a catalyst that accelerates demands for high-quality and large screens,'' he added.

Developed at the company's seventh-generation production lines at Paju, Kyonggi Province, the high-feature panel is a wide screen (16:9) with its width and height amounting to 2.2 meters and 1.2 meters, respectively.

The high-definition model, which offers 6.22 million pixels and can produce 1.07 billion colors, boasts a response speed faster than 5 milliseconds.

That means the amount of time it takes for the LCD TV's liquid crystal cell to go from black to white is 5 milliseconds, lower than previous norm of double-digit milliseconds.

Lower numbers represent faster transitions and therefore less visible image artifacts. Monitors will not create a smear or blur pattern around moving objects.

The LCD panel of LG.Philips LCD, the joint venture between LG Electronics and Royal Philips Electronics of the Netherlands, also has a maximum 3,000:1 contrast ratio and 180-degree viewing angle.

The contrast ratio means that the brightest color on the screen is 3,000 times brighter than the darkest color that the panel is capable of displaying simultaneously. The higher the ratio is, the better the display is.

In addition, the wide viewing angle shows that the images on the monitor will be vivid to watchers at any angle.

The 100-inch model is expected to maintain the summit place for the time being because Samsung Electronics, the cross-town rival of LG.Philips LCD, has no scheme to challenge the product.

Samsung, which developed the previously biggest 82-inch LCD panel last year, has been touted as arguably the only candidate posing a threat to LG.Philips for biggest LCD.

We are not researching any LCD panel larger than 82 inches diagonally and have no plan to develop at the moment,'' Samsung spokesman Shin Young-jun said.

The remark sharply contrasts to that of Samsung's executive vice president, Kim Sang-soo, who expressed confidence in producing mega-sized LCD at an unveiling event of the 82-inch item in March 2005.

Making a 97-inch model is just a matter of time. There is virtually no technical limitation for producing LCD larger than 82 inches,'' Kim said at the time.

Battle for Biggest LCD

LG.Philips originally took the driver's seat in the battle for the biggest LCD by creating a 52-inch panel in December 2002 and a 55-inch one in October 2003 for the first time in history.

Samsung then surprised the world with a 57-inch LCD in December 2003 and a 82-inch product in March 2005.

LG.Philips took the upper hand once again with the 100-inch item, previously regarded as impossible for relatively small size-specific LCD in comparison to the plasma display panel (PDP).

LCD is the first offspring of the flat-screen family, which eroded the long-time dominance of the bulky cube-based monitor that causes eye strain and consumes a lot of power.

As the technology opened the door to flat-panel displays with outstanding advantages, another high-end screen PDP was also brought into the game.

Unlike the fat cube-based TVs, both LCD and PDP are of sleek appearance as they show images via liquid crystal or plasma, which are sandwiched between two thin glass plates.

Technologically, PDP is suitable for large-sized screens since it is difficult to trap plasma between two small plates. By contrast, LCD does not go well with large monitors due to the properties of liquid crystal.

As a result, experts have expected LCD would be the mainstream product for the small screen while PDP would be predominant in the market for screens larger than 40-inches.

However, the uphill battle between Korea's dynamic duo _ LG.Philips and Samsung _ has worked in the favor of LCD by trimming its price and adding seamless technological advances.

The 100-inch LCD is merely three inches shy of the biggest 103-inch PDP monitor, unveiled by Japan's Panasonic earlier this year.

LCD prices halved last year to the level of LCD thanks to technological progresses and rivalry in the 40-plus inch LCD panels market, the major battlefield between the two flat-panel products,.

The prices of large-area LCD panels are likely to drop rapidly this year and beyond, while PDP prices will most probably fall at a snail's pace.

Market observers predict LCD will maintain its competitiveness in even 50-inch display markets, which they initially thought would be flatly dominated by PDP.

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Delta Accelerating LED and FFL BLU Development
22 May 2006

Delta Electronics, Taiwan's CCFL manufacturer, has set up an R&D team to develop LED backlight technology and has already delivered some samples to customers, according to company chairman Bruce Cheng.

LEDs may continue to face difficulty in replacing CCFLs as a major backlight source for general LCD displays for the coming four to five years, Cheng commented. However, as LEDs are seen as the future technology for mainstream backlights, Delta considers its initial investments in the area as a first step in a long-term investment, Cheng noted.

Delta currently reaches a CCFL capacity of about 500,000 units per month, according to Cheng. By the end of 2006, when its capacity expansion plan is fulfilled, monthly capacity will extend to 19.5 million CCFL units, said Cheng.

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New Concept LCD Drive Chip Developed
23 May 2006

The Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy announced yesterday that a domestic venture company has developed a new-concept LCD driver IC (LDI) allowing a reduction of 30% in costs.

The new concept LDI of TLI Inc., a semiconductor design specialist, improves processing speed significantly through higher transmission efficiency, and also allows direct attachment to a panel.

By adopting ternary lines differential signaling (TLDS) technology, which transmits signals through three lines, the LDI delivers significantly improved processing speed with almost 1.7 times higher efficiency per line than the conventional series transmission method using two lines, and this means added value in technology and economy.

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Samung Electronics may use LEDs in LCD monitor
23 May 2006

Samsung Electronics may introduce LCD monitors that features LED backlighting, according to industry sources. In addition, ViewSonic is also considering marketing LED monitors, the sources added.

However, Taiwan-based backlight units (BLU) makers are still conservative about the prospects of using LED backlighting in LCD monitors, as the production costs are still too high compared with conventional CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamp) backlighting, the makers commented.

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LED backlighting for TVs coming faster than anticipated, says Insight Media
26 May 2006




Conventional wisdom sees LED based backlights not making significant inroads into large screen LCD TVs until 2009 or so. But based on analysis done by Insight Media, LED backlighting will be adopted much faster than previously thought.

Driving this conclusion are several factors. First, development of high-brightness LEDs is occurring even faster than earlier aggressive forecasts. These developments promise brighter, more compact LEDs. This will in turn, enable the use of edge-illuminated backlight methods - even for large area LCD TVs. Many developers are focused on direct LED backlights, which will become price-performance competitive any time soon. Edge-illuminated backlights require fewer LEDs, and if forecasts for performance improvements hold true, they will become cost competitive with CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamps) sooner rather than later.

A third factor is the groundswell of backlight innovation currently underway to replace films and other light management structures. The combination of these three factors is now likely to lead to cost-competitive LED backlight units by 2007 in 32-inch LCD TVs, with larger sizes competitive in the following years. Couple this with the possibility of a company making a strategic decision to convert to LED backlights, and the factors are all in place to enable a rapid transition away from CCFL to LED-based backlight units (BLUs) beginning in 2008.

Intelligent backlights, particularly dimmable versions, will also make faster in-roads than commonly expected. Additionally, industry growth and technology changes will create headaches for CCFL BLU makers. CCFL shortages are likely to develop in 2007 because CCFL makers will be reluctant to invest in capacity that won't be needed after the transition to LEDs.

The following graph shows the backlight shipments forecast for the 40-44-inch segment by backlight technology through 2010, with the expected penetration of LEDs into the market. While CCFL will continue to be an important and substantial backlight technology, the bulk of the growth after 2009 will be in LED based backlights.

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Osram: Efficiency of LED-BLUs to approach that of CCFL starting in 2007
26 May 2006

Osram anticipates the growing adoption of LEDs as a blacklight unit (BLU) light source due to an anticipated increase in LED efficiency, according to Ludwig Ploetz, application engineering manager (OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH) at Osram, on a May 25 2006 Taiwan FPD International Conference event.

Ploetz expects the efficiency of LED-based BLUs to approach that of cold cathode fluorescent lamp- (CCFL-) BLUs starting in 2007. The battery life of a LED-based BLU panel notebook could be extended by 2.5 times, he pointed out. Costs of LED-based products should also decrease with the adoption of high performance LED chips, he said.

LED-based BLUs meet RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment) requirements, Ploetz pointed out. Heat dissipation and color gamut, however, could be still improved, he said.

According to statistics from Insight Media, LED-based BLUs will be used in only 40- to 44-inch LCD TVs from 2007.
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post #2 of 62 Old 06-07-2006, 12:28 PM
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The Samsung 57" is now reality. MSRP of $10k.

http://www.samsung.com/Products/TV/L...S5797DXXAA.asp

Reports of it being seen Magnolia Stores in Calif the past week with amazing PQ.

Samsung 65F8000, 60D8000, 40HU6350, Panasonic 50E60 LCD's
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post #3 of 62 Old 06-14-2006, 12:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Proton highlights large-size LED backlit LCD TV at Computex 2006
6 June 2006


Proton's 42-inch LCD TV with LED backlighting technology.



Proton debuts 32-inch LCD TV featuring LED backlighting source at Computex.


Proton Electronic Industrial is debuting its 32-and 42-inch LCD TVs using LED as backlighting sources at the ongoing Computex 2006 show in June 6-10, according to the company.

Proton plans to volume produce the two models in the third quarter of this year, the company stated. The company has not detailed suggested prices.

Featuring a 6.5ms response time, the 42-inch LCD TV has resolution of 1,920x1,080, contrast ratio of 1,200:1 and brightness of 500 nits. The 32-inch model features resolution of 1,366x768, brightness of 550 nits, contrast ratio of 1,000:1. The 32-inch TV also has response time of 8ms and viewing angle of 176 degree (vertical/ horizontal), noted Proton.

LED backlighting has become more and more popular in the LCD TV market as opposed to its alternative cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs). Sony recently also showcased a prototype of 82-inch TV using LED backlighting, which Sony also uses in some of its 40- and 46-inch models.

In late 2005, Opto-Electronics & Systems (OES) Laboratories under the government-sponsored Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) demonstrated a 42-inch LCD TV that used LED backlighting, with each LED delivering 25 lumen per watt. Mass production of the backlight unit (BLU) for 42-inch LCD TVs will commence in 2007, the research institute said.

During Computex Taiepi 2006, Proton will also highlight 55-inch HD (high-definition) LCD TV which it debuted at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) (January 5-8) in Las Vegas. The full line of Proton's LCD TVs will be presented at booth G526,G528,G625,G627 in Hall 3.

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AUO promises CRT quality from an LCD
13 June 2006




AUO is showing off their new LCD technology this week at the FPD Taiwan 2006 show. They already improved conventional CCFL backlighting, but their new HiColor Technology with RGB LED backlight ups the available NTSC color gamut from 72% to 105%, eliminating one of the major complaints about LCDs. Their new Simulated Pulse Driving technology improves gray-to-gray refresh rates to 4ms, giving what they claim is CRT-level image quality. Advanced MVA technology provides a 1200:1 contrast ratio that will also improve the color washout typical of LCD screens, and improved image processing for better detail. Better yet, all this technology is ready for the 1366x768 and 1920x1080 panels of the future.

It all sounds great, now we just need to find out who will be slapping their sticker on all this shiny new technology when it hits the shelf and how much it will cost. Hopefully we can get a picture or two once the show starts tomorrow.

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Panels with fast response times come up winners at FPD Taiwan
14 June 2006



AUO 19-inch panel with 2ms response time



CMO eco TV technology



CPT 1ms-response-time LCD TV panel


With FPD Taiwan 2006 officially beginning on July 14 and awards for display products and technologies presented to major panel makers in Taiwan, fast response times are a common theme among the award-winning products.

AU Optronics (AUO) won an award for a 19-inch monitor panel with a 2ms response time. The panel (M190EG02) was launched last year, with the company claiming it was the world's first 19-inch panel for monitor applications with a 2ms response time (gray to gray), a 160-degree viewing angle and an 800:1 contrast ratio. The company stated it was also the world's first panel that applies overdrive technology on TN panels and is a lead-free product that conforms to Restrictions on Hazardous Substances (RoHS) and green product requirements.

Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) won an award for a 56-inch Quad Full High Definition (QFHD, 3,840×2,160) LCD TV panel with a 5ms response time. The panel, first introduced in September, 2005, features 8.29 million pixels, with the company claiming it has the highest resolution among all panels. The panel also has a 1,200:1 contrast ratio and a 75% NTSC color gamut.

In April, company president Chao-yang Ho said CMO has sent samples of the panels to customers, with volume production to commence in the third quarter of 2006 and shipments to Japan, Europe and the US to each exceed 100 units per month. The panel is produced from CMO's 5.5-generation (5.5G) plant; a 5.5G glass substrate can be cut into two 56-inch TV panels.

In addition, CMO's "eco TV" won a Best Technology Award. The technology helps achieves higher contrast ratios and lower power consumption by integrating an optimally controlled mechanism for a backlight unit (BLU) with high-transmittance liquid crystal (LC) cells. As a result, power consumption can be cut by 25%, light efficiency can be lowered by 10-15% while contrast can be improved by four times.

In addition, Chunghwa Picture Tubes (CPT)'s 32-inch optical compensation bend (OCB) LCD TV panel also landed a product award. The panel has a 1ms response time (moving picture response time is 8ms), 1,200:1 contrast and a viewing angle of 170/170 degrees. The OCB LCD TV panel is already produced at CPT's 6G plant. Each of the CPT's 6G substrate can but cut in eight 32-inch panels.

FPD Taiwan 2006, the largest flat-panel display (FPD) show in Taiwan, is held at the Taipei World Trade Center from June 14 to 16.
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FPD Taiwan 2006: Panel makers accelerate development of LED-backlit TV panel
16 June 2006



AUO's 37-inch HDTV-LED backlit panel



AUO will begin mass production of its 12.1-inch LCD panel
that features white LED backlighting in the second half of this year.
The 12.1-inch panel uses glass that is only 0.3mm thick.


CMO's 32-inch LCD TV with slim LED backlight units (BLU)
will arrive in the the third quarter of 2006



CPT's high color gamut LCD TV panel with CCFL backlighting.
Its color gamut is similar to panels that use LED backlighting



CPT is showcasing RGB LED backlit LCD TV panels at FPD Taiwan 2006


With Samsung Electronics and LG.Philips LCD set to commence volume production of LED-backlit TV panels in the second half of this year, Taiwan panel makers including AU Optronics (AUO), Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) and Chunghwa Picture Tubes (CPT) are also looking to introduce similar panels.

At FPD Taiwan 2006, AUO is highlighting a 37-inch LCD TV panel that features HiColor technology with RGB LED backlighting. The HiColor Technology enables the 37-inch panel to reach a 105% NTSC color gamut, whereas conventional CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamp) backlighting achieves a color gamut of only 72%, according to the company. AUO has not yet issued a volume production schedule for the TV panel though. Last year at FPD International 2005 (October 19-21) in Yokohama, Japan, the panel maker showcased a 46-inch LCD TV panel that used LED backlighting and had a contrast ratio of 10,000:1.

CMO is presenting a 32-inch TV panel featuring slim LED backlighting at FPD Taiwan. The thickness of the panel is only 30mm, and the company claims it is the slimmest TV panel in the world. The panel also features a brightness of 500 nits, a response time of 6.5ms, a contrast ratio of 1,200:1, and almost 100% coverage of the NTSC color gamut. CMO stated it will begin volume production of the panel next quarter.

CPT's 37-inch LED-backlit TV panel also drew attention at the show. The 37-inch model has a resolution of 1366x768, a contrast ratio of 8,000,000:1 and a brightness of 700nits. The company's Area Control & APC technology allows the power consumption of the panel to drop below 200W, CPT stressed. The company has sent sample to customers and plans to mass produce the panel in the first quarter of 2007, CPT said.

In addition to LED backlighting, CPT showcased high color gamut (NTSC>100%) panels that use conventional CCFL backlighting. The company has scheduled mass production of the panels for the fourth quarter of this year, CPT pointed out.

FPD Taiwan is the largest flat-panel display (FPD) show in Taiwan and it is being held at the Taipei World Trade Center from June 14 to 16.

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Wellypower showcases CCFL for use in 57-inch LCD TV at FPD Taiwan 2006
19 June 2006



Wellypower showcases CCFL for use in 57-inch LCD TV at FPD Taiwan 2006, Jun 19, 2006


CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamp) specialist Wellypower Optronics is showcased Taiwan's longest CCFL at the FPD Taiwan 2006 (June 14-16).

The CCFL maker has sent a sample to panel maker AU Optronics (AUO). However, Wellypower has not yet issued a volume production schedule for the 57-inch LCD TV-use CCFL.

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Wellypower to ship U-shaped CCFLs for LCD TVs in 3Q
20 June 2006

Wellypower Optronics, Taiwan's largest CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamp) maker, expects to begin shipping U-shaped CCFLs for use in 26-and 32-inch LCD TVs in the third quarter, according to the company.

Shipments of the U-shaped CCFLs will be only in limited volume initially, added Wellypower.

To further reduce production costs, CCFL makers are now developing alternative methods, said industry sources. Conventionally, a 32-inch LCD TV will need 16 straight CCFLs which can be replaced by only eight U-shaped CCFLs, said the CCFL maker.

Wellypower currently produces straight-type CCFLs for LCD TVs with a focus on the 32- and 37-inch segments. The company will begin mass production of 42-inch CCFLs for LCD TVs in the second half of this year, Wellypower said.

Delta Electronics, another major CCFL maker, recently has begun shipping U-shaped CCFLs for 26-inch and 32-inch LCD TVs, industry sources said.

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Heat concerns slow high-power LED adoption
26 June 2006




Osram touting slogan of "Any size you want" at
OPTO Taiwan 2006, but stays clear of the heat behind





Everlight showcasing LED streetlamp, which consists of 84 LEDs
delivering 37.4lm/W and consuming 4.85A in current





LED and CCFL comparison in notebook applications:
Expectation or current fact?


Adoption of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in high brightness panel backlighting applications, such as notebooks and LCD TVs, has been delayed due to overheating issues, according to sources in the Taiwan LED industry. In order to minimize the temperature that comes from the back of panel backlight modules, LED packaging firms are vying for various solutions that can reduce heat as much as possible, but material costs inevitably increase as heat management improves, indicated the sources.

Due to technology requirements and cost concerns, LED adoption will not penetrate the notebook market until the fourth quarter of 2006, while adoption in the large-size LCD TV segment will phenomenally increase after the second quarter of 2007, according to the sources. The speculation was offered in response to a June 15 article, which cited the chairman of Taiwan's largest LED packaging firm Everlight Electronics, Robert Yeh, as indicating that the company's scheduled shipments of white LEDs used in notebooks and larger-size LCD TVs will be pushed back to the second half of 2007.

Processor Ching-Cherng Sun, in the Chinese-language Micro-Electronics Magazine, commented that high-power LEDs, considered as a future lighting source to replace CCFLs, are progressively developing with higher and higher efficiency. For example, companies in Japan now have the ability to produce high-power LEDs that deliver 70 lumen per watt (70lm/W), whereas domestic LED packaging and testing firms are only able to manufacture high-power LEDs with 40lm/W. However, the heat dissipation issue has become a major hiccup in LED development for lighting objects, according to Sun. Using ceramics or heat pipes is an effective way to prevent heating, but heat management solutions drive material costs up, said Sun. The purpose of heat management designs for high-power LEDs is to efficiently lower the thermal resistance between the chips' heat generation to end products, dubbed "R junction-to-case," Sun mentioned. One of the solutions is to utilize materials that provide low thermal-resistance but high conductivity, through the die attach and heat slug methods that enable transmission of the heat directly from chips to the outer space of the packaged case, Sun said.

Everlight showcased an LED streetlamp, which consisted of 84 LEDs delivering 37.4lm/W and consuming 4.85A of power at the LED Lighting Taiwan 2006 exhibition that took place at the Taipei World Trade Center (TWTC) June 14-17. According to the company, the LED streetlamp incorporates a "U-shaped" circuit design to minimize heat problems. Everlight declined to further comment on the solution, but said that the circuit design of thermal management had been co-developed with an unspecified company and was recently patented.

Lite-On Technology responded to the concern about heat by saying that copper is their current heat-sink material, as copper is cheaper in price, but is efficient enough in heat dissipation.

Despite giving a more conservative outlook for the notebook- and TV-use LED markets, sources at Taiwan LED manufacturers expressed optimism about demand from seven-inch panel backlighting applications. As an example of the narrowing price gap between traditional and LED-based lighting solutions, sources said that, for a backlight module used in seven-inch panel applications, a cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) plus an inverter cost about NT$150 (US$4.58), while an LED-based backlight module that consists of 30 white LEDs plus a converter costs about NT$180.

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Panel makers target high-end and niche applications with LED-backlit panels
29 June 2006

Taiwan-based panel makers are focusing on high-end and niche applications for LED-backlit LCD panels, because it will still take some time for the price difference between LED and CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamp) backlighting to narrow as CCFLs see continued performance improvements, according to panel makers.

Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) plans to introduce 32- and 37-inch LED-backlit panels with a 90% NTSC color gamut as early as the fourth quarter of 2006, with 42-inch models to follow in the fourth quarter, the company said. The 32-inch panels will mostly be sold in Europe, the company added.

Chunghwa Picture Tubes (CPT) should mass produce 37-inch RGB LED-backlit panels with a greater-than-105% NTSC color gamut some time in 2007, sources said.

AU Optronics (AUO) introduced a 32-inch LED-backlit panel with 450-nit brightness, 1,200:1 contrast ratio and 90% NTSC color gamut in the second quarter. The company will focus mainly on developing monitor panels with its LED-backlit models this year. AUO has delivered LED-backlit monitor panels to Sony and has rolled out 20.1-inch panels with 250-nit brightness, 1,000:1 contrast ratio and 100% NTSC color gamut, sources said. In addition, the company will introduce 24-inch widescreen LED-backlit panels in the fourth quarter of 2006, with the panels featuring a response time of 6ms, brightness of 1,000:1 and NTSC color gamut of over 100%. Possible clients include Sony and Samsung Electronics, the sources added.

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LEDs in notebook applications not to come until 2Q 2007
3 July 2006

Taiwan LED packaging firms Everlight Electronics and Unity Opto Technology project that LEDs for notebook backlighting won't be see serious adoption until the second quarter of 2007 due to the current higher costs of production.

A 12.1-inch LED-based notebook display needs 44 white LEDs, which deliver a brightness of up to 200 nits and has a thickness of only 0.8mm, much better than what a 12.1-inch CCFL notebook display can produce, sources at Taiwan LED makers indicated.

However, as higher-efficiency LED chips produce more heat, LED packaging firms prefer to use low-efficiency chips in larger quantities to avoid heat problems, according to the sources. A lack of effective heat management designs in the industry has inevitably slowed down the adoption of LEDs, noted the sources. Ineffective heat management has necessarily resulted in more procurement of heat-sink materials, the sources noted.

The expected time frame for the penetration of LED backlights into notebook applications has therefore been pushed back from an original forecast of the second quarter of this year to the second quarter of 2007, the sources noted.

Everlight chairman Robert Yeh earlier stated that the price gap between an LED-based notebook and a CCFL one will be narrowed to less than NT$200 (US$6.20) in the fourth quarter of 2006, when Everlight will officially enter volume shipments for the application. The company has not received any actual orders from notebook vendors, but will be ready as soon as market acceptance and cost allows, according to the company.

Unity Opto said it is in talks with three to four notebook vendors and is currently in the trial-production phase in partnership with Formosa Epitaxy and Global Lighting Technologies (GLT). The company expects the technology and price to become more mature in the second quarter of 2007, when Unity Opto is able to expand the production volume significantly, the company noted.

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Samsung to unveil 40-inch backlit LCD TV in September
7 August 2006

Samsung Electronics plans to launch in September a 40-inch LCD TV that features an LED backlight, according to a recent report from research firm Displaybank. The 40-inch LED TV targets the European market with a price tag of US$3,000, noted the report, which added that the new TV will source panels from S-LCD, a joint venture between Samsung Electronics and Sony.

The release of the LCD TV with LED backlighting is mainly to strengthen Samsung's brand image, the report indicated.

Sony launched 40-and 46-inch LCD TVs with LED backlighting in November 2004. The company offered the 40-and 46-inch models for 1.1025 million yen (US$9,629) and 840,000 yen (US$7,334), respectively, according to Sony. However, sales of the two TVs did not meet expectations due to unfriendly pricing and the immature technology of LED backlighting, sources indicated.

According to DigiTimes Research, prices for a 40-inch LED backlight unit (BLU) are standing at about US$610 this year, compared to US$210 for a BLU featuring conventional cold-cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs). By 2009, the price for a 40-inch LED BLU is expected to fall to US$315, DigiTimes Research predicts.

Shipments for LED backlighting used in TVs will outpace that for CCFL technology in 2010, according to a forecast by Insight Media.
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post #5 of 62 Old 08-08-2006, 09:25 AM
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I'll assume VPs will be covered under chip set. Could you include motion adaptation (120Hz, etc?)

HD-DVD is dead, so now I'm a Gary McCoy fanboy.
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post #6 of 62 Old 08-22-2006, 03:03 PM
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120 Hz is very interesting. If anyone get this panel (someone with DEEP pockets) I'd be interested to see if it can really take a 1080p120 signal over HDMI. Or if it's just a mode that you can upscale anything to easily (5:5 pull up for movies and 2:2 for video, even mixed mode should be easy with PiP on the same screen with no weird issues). I guess PAL folks are SOL though without dual mode 100Hz support.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orogogus View Post

120 Hz is very interesting. If anyone get this panel (someone with DEEP pockets) I'd be interested to see if it can really take a 1080p120 signal over HDMI. Or if it's just a mode that you can upscale anything to easily (5:5 pull up for movies and 2:2 for video, even mixed mode should be easy with PiP on the same screen with no weird issues). I guess PAL folks are SOL though without dual mode 100Hz support.

i'm pretty sure 1080p120 isn't one of the current HDMI supported modes - that'd be a lot of bandwidth.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikea28 View Post

i'm pretty sure 1080p120 isn't one of the current HDMI supported modes - that'd be a lot of bandwidth.

Should be doable with 1.3 and the increase there. I'd have to check the spec, but it really doesn't matter about an external signal anyway. This is 120Hz internal display rate anyway (5:5 pull up on film and 2:2/4:4 on video sources). Then you have the best of all possible worlds in terms of cadence errors.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orogogus View Post

Should be doable with 1.3 and the increase there. I'd have to check the spec, but it really doesn't matter about an external signal anyway. This is 120Hz internal display rate anyway (5:5 pull up on film and 2:2/4:4 on video sources). Then you have the best of all possible worlds in terms of cadence errors.

oh i agree for pulling up 24/30/60 fps inputs, 120hz is perfect and absolutely the ideal refresh rate for the future. i'm just saying that 1080p120 ain't happening any time soon.

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Hello,

Extended color gamut models are now appearing on the market, and I'm questioning wether this is something really useful, or just a marketing gimmick.

The way I understand thing, there are really only 2 color gamuts we really care about:

1-) HDTV (ITU-R 709) which defines the proper color gamut for HDTV.
2-) SMPTE-C, which defines the proper color gamut for standard definition television, including DVDs.

According to review results where the RGB primaries are measured, it seems that these two color gamuts are already covered by common equipment with standard backlights.

From the graphs that are displayed, it seems that the NTSC color gamut referred to by marketeers is the old 1953 standard that nobody uses anymore.

So the question is, what's the point of trying to cover a now useless color gamut?
Doesn't that makes it even more difficult to properly render accurate colors in the two colorspaces of interest?

Thanks!
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Higher efficacy of LEDs should solve a whole lot of LED BLU power consumption issues. Here's the latest big news from Cree.



Quote:


Cree unveils 160-lumen XLamp LED
10 Oct 2006

Cree's new XLamp LED can produce up to 160 lumens at 700 mA, and has a typical output of 80 lm at 350 mA.

XLamp 7090 XR-E LED

US LED manufacturer Cree has opened up a whole new field of general lighting applications with its latest generation of XLamp power LEDs. The company describes the XR-E series as a "new class of lighting LED".

The headline figures show a luminous flux of up to 95 lumens at 350 mA, equivalent to a luminous efficacy of 85 lm/W. At a current of 700 mA, the output is as high as 160 lumens for the top bin.

These are highly impressive numbers, but the most useful comparison is given by the typical values at the center of the production distribution. For the XR-E, these numbers are 80 lumens at 350 mA, with 70 lm/W. Many low-power LEDs operating at 20 mA would struggle to achieve this efficacy value.

Mark McClear, Cree's director of marketing for solid-state lighting, emphasized that LEDs typically producing 80 lm are already in volume production. "We've already shipped more than one-quarter million devices," he told LEDs Magazine.

Comparison of power LEDs

Cree's current-generation XLamp 7090 XR yields "only" 57 lm at 350 mA, equivalent to 47 lm/W. Osram's new Platinum Dragon device, launched last week, produces 70 lm at 700 mA, and has an efficacy of 30 lm/W.

Cree says that its new LEDs are designed to enable general lighting applications, such as street lighting, retail high-bay lighting and parking-garage low-bay lighting, as well as to improve light quality in consumer applications such as flashlights.

In McClear's view, the leap in performance demonstrated by Cree will now make LEDs a cost-effective alternative to traditional lighting technologies in many general lighting applications.

The increased performance of the XR-E is due to several improvements in chip and phosphor technology, says McClear. The new LED retains the same package as its predecessor.

The XR-E is the first power LED based on Cree's EZBright 1000 LED chip, unveiled last month. The device has a very low forward voltage, around 3.3 V at 350 mA, contributing to lower power consumption. The XR-E also has vastly improved color uniformity now that Cree has started to use a different phosphor process to deposit a thin, uniform layer of material directly onto the chip surface.

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Great thead!
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Samsung announces biggest consumer LCD available: 70-inch, 1080p
20 August 2006






Just when we found the perfect spot to put the Sharp 65-inch LC-65D90U LCD, Samsung has announced their 70-inch LCD will be available to consumers during the first half of 2007. Sporting a full 1080p resolution, 2000:1 contrast ratio, sub-8ms reponse time and 120hz refresh rate, Samsung thinks it will compete with similar large plasma HDTVs. While LG still has the crown of the biggest LCD we've heard about, this will be the biggest one actually available. It will be shown publicly for the first time on the 23rd at the International Meeting on Information Displays (IMID) 2006 in Korea, which is exactly far off enough to get a plane ticket, fly across the Pacific and check it out before you order one.

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SAMSUNG releases innovative LED LCD TV and Full HD LCD TVs
1 September 2006



< l_led_full_tvs.jpg >

Berlin, Germany - 1st September, 2006: Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., a market leader in consumer electronics, maked another breakthrough in LCD TV technology, with the release of a number of premium LCD TVs that boast high picture quality, advanced features and elegant design.

Samsung announced the release of a 40" LCD TV with high powered LED Backlight technology, which received Europe's prestigious "Innovation Award" from the EISA (European Image and Sound Association) for its superb features including LED light source, 146% wide colour gamut and industry leading contrast ratio (10,000:1).

At the same time, 40" and 46" LCD models that support full HD resolution (1920x1080p) - double the previous best HD performance (1366x768, 1080i) - and provide high contrast (6000:1) are also introduced.

The new 40" with LED light source realises far richer colour reproduction, based on a wide colour gamut that is 46% improved from previous models and enables unprecedented sound volume. High Dynamic Contrast Ratio, Samsung's proprietary technology, provides deeper and more refined images with the highest contrast in the industry.

The LED LCD TV also brings a new level to the clarity of moving images, based on Samsung's exclusive LCD 100 Hz video quality enhancement technology. A TV screen displays about 50 frames per second, which can create drag in fast-moving videos. Samsung's LCD 100 Hz inserts a frame between each two frames, considerably reducing motion blur. The inserted frame maintains the detailed motion characteristic of the video, and goes through motion estimation and compensation processing. Therefore, compared to a mere duplication and insertion of frames, more natural motion can be realised without undermining other characteristics such as clarity, brightness and colour.

The LED light source helps increase the panel life two fold compared to previous CCFL panels. The light source is also environmentally friendly because it uses no Mercury.

Samsung also released 40" and 46" LCD TVs that realise the best picture quality and perfectly complement the Blu-ray disc player by supporting full HD resolution (1920x1080p), double the previous best HD resolution (1366x768, 1080i). It is expected that various multimedia devices based on full HD, as well as full HD multimedia content created by world-leading movie content producers will increase rapidly. In this regard, Samsung's new 40" and 46" models will play a crucial role in the new era of full HD LCD TV.

Besides picture quality, the new LCD TVs are elegant ornaments for any environment, with a high gloss finish, transparent bottom plate, hidden bar speaker, and swivel stand. The stylish ocean blue LED indicator light illuminates the transparent bottom plate with the colour of the ocean at sunset.

Furthermore, Samsung's new LCD TV provides advanced connectivity, exceptional gaming images, surround sound, viewing flexibility, and low energy consumption.

The unparalleled picture quality of Samsung's new LCD TVs can be optimised for gaming at the touch of a button. In addition, it delivers dark area enhancement, H-sharpness control, and surround sound effects to produce an exciting, magical environment.

For more powerful connectivity, Samsung's new LCD TVs has WiseLink™ which offers extended "10 in 3" compatibility, connecting into: Multi Memory Slot (MMS), USB, and Printer Port, 2HDMI which simultaneously connect two devices with full signal transmission.

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Sharp's very, very sharp experimental screen
4 October 2006




MAKUHARI, Japan--Anyway you look at it, 8.84 million pixels is a lot of points of light.

Sharp has produced a 64-inch LCD monitor that provides screen resolution four times that of normal high-definition screens. Normal HD screens have 2 million pixel points. The new Sharp monitor, which is on display at the Ceatec technology trade show here this week, sports 4,096-by-2,160 pixel-line resolution--double the number of vertical and horizontal pixel lines offered by a normal HD screen. This comes out to nearly 9 million pixel points.

Small details, like plumes of smoke over an aerial shot of a rural village, can be picked out. The monitor can also be divided into quarters and display four high-definition videos at once.

The screen, still in the development phase, will be targeted at film and television producers as well as medical researchers, a Sharp representative said. The exhibit is one of the more popular at the weeklong trade show taking place outside Tokyo. But eventually, these technologies trickle down to the consumer market.

The company is using the show to emphasize its role in the screen world. In August, Sharp formally began producing LCD panels out of its second Kameyama plant. The plant processes eighth-generation glass sheets, which measure just over 7 feet by 8 feet. Six 52-inch LCDs can be popped out of a single sheet. The smaller glass sheets processed in sixth- and seventh-generation plants can only produce two and three 52-inch panels, respectively, out of a single piece of glass.

Other prototypes being shown include a screen with a technology Sharp calls Mega Contrast. The screen has a 1 million-to-1 contrast ratio. Typical HD LCD screens sport a 1,200-to-1 contrast ratio.

On other notes, Sharp also showed off its Japanese-English electronic translator, which will come to the Japanese market later this year. If you speak a Japanese phrase into it, the handheld translates it into spoken English text--and vice versa.

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JVC LED-Backlight LCD TV













GadgetManiac
5 October 2006

JVC has come out with new model of LCD TV that ditches the usual cold cathode fluorescent lamp used to light up LCD display panels, in favor of LEDs. The advantage provided by the LED backlighting is in the nicer/cleaner/more colors for your viewing pleasure.

As seen at CEATEC JAPAN 2006. Not many details available except that it appears to have a nice contrast ratio of 12000:1.

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Engadget: JVC's LED backlit LCD at CEATEC 2006
5 October 2006

LCD TVs using LEDs for backlighting aren't exactly new -- Sony's high-end Qualia line has had this feature for a while -- but getting them down to a price affordable for most consumers has still proven to be an unattainable goal. Samsung had a 40-inch 10,000:1 contrast ratio beauty on display at IFA 2006 last month, and now the good folks at JVC are showing the model pictured above at CEATEC 2006. No deets on pricing, specs or even size are available yet, but if plasma isn't a good fit for your wall or budget -- and waiting around for SED is too much of a bore -- LED backlighting is the best bet for improved color reproduction and black levels in LCDs.

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Displayblog: JVC LCD TV with LED Backlight at CEATEC 2006
5 October 2006

LED backlights will be the lighting technology of the future, and for some, now. JVC showcased a LCD TV using a LED backlight at CEATEC 2006. There are many advantages to having LEDs instead of CCFLs.

1. Better color gamut. LED: ~100% NTSC. CCFL: 72% –> 92% NTSC

2. Longer life. LED light output decreases extremely slower over 50,000 hours. CCFL brightness comes down quite a bit through 50,000 hours.

3. Instant on. LED chips do not need time to warm up. CCFLs do.

But there are downsides…

1. LEDs pump out a lot of heat and need inactive and active thermal management. CCFLs are generally pretty darn cool.

2. Hundreds if not thousands of LED chips are required on large LCD TVs. Only a couple of dozen for CCFL.

3. LED backlights are expensive. CCFLs are pretty cheap in comparison.

There is much R&D toward pumping out more light from LED chips, making them smaller in size and keeping them cool. We’re at an inflection point and LED will take off real soon.

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CMO to go quad high-definition with new 47-inch LCD TV panels
16 October 2006

Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) has announced plans for a consumer-grade, high-resolution 47-inch Quad High Definition (QHD, 2560×1440) LCD TV panel slated for mass production in the second quarter of 2007.

Continuing on the success of its 56-inch Quad Full High Definition (QFHD) panel (3840×2160), which the company claims has the highest resolution of any LCD TV panel in the world, CMO said it is now starting a new global trend in flat panel LCDs with its new 47-inch panel featuring a 16:9 aspect ratio and a 3.68 million pixel display (2560×1440).

CMO said its 47-inch QHD LCD TV panel is 1.78 times bigger than the highest pixel count available for digital TV panel with 2.07 million pixels (FHD, 1920×1080), and is four times bigger than the 920,000 pixel count for 1280×720 HD panels.

CMO said the 47-inch QHD panel has a brightness of 450 nits, contrast ratio of 1500:1, color saturation rate of 90% (NTSC) and a response time of 6.5ms.

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LG.Philips LCD Demonstrates Cutting-Edge Suite of TFT-LCDs at FPD International 2006
16 October 2006



LG.Philips LCD is highlighting a 32-inch backlight unit (BLU) prototype using
low-power external electrode fluorescent lamp (EEFL) technology, which is
claimed to feature 10% less power consumption than its previous EEFL BLUs



LG.Philips LCD is showing a variety of large-size panels at
FPD International 2006 in Japan, including a 30-inch notebook panel,
claimed to be the largest among its peers


SEOUL, South Korea--(BUSINESS WIRE)--LG.Philips LCD (NYSE:LPL)(KRX:034220), a leading manufacturer of thin-film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) technology, announced today that it will showcase its cutting-edge suite of TFT-LCD panels for HDTVs, desktop monitors, notebook PCs and mobile phones at booth #380 during FPD International 2006 in Yokohama, Japan.

A sampling of the company’s show highlights include:

Full HD LCDs for True HDTVs

LG.Philips LCD will demonstrate its line-up of full high definition (1920 x 1080, two megapixels) TFT-LCD panels for HDTVs, including 37-, 42- and 47-inch widescreen displays. These panels all feature a viewing angle of 178 degrees, a 1600:1 dynamic contrast ratio, a maximum brightness of 600 cd/m2, a gray-to-gray response time of 8 ms and a high color gamut of 92 percent for natural image display. The company will also present its 100-inch widescreen, a full HD LCD panel, which was recently listed in the 2007 Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s largest LCD panel.

Budiman Sastra, LG.Philips LCD’s Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer said, “This year, we have unveiled a number of products that mark significant milestones in the history of the display industry, including a 100-inch LCD panel and a 14.1-inch flexible e-book display, both of which are the largest of their kind. We believe these product developments, as well as other innovations across our product portfolio, highlight LG.Philips LCD’s technology leadership and underscore our ability to effectively meet our customers’ current and future needs and satisfy consumer demand.”

Superior LCDs for Premium Desktop Monitors and Notebook PCs

In addition, LG.Philips LCD will show its fleet of TFT-LCD panels for premium desktop monitors, including the world’s largest and highest resolution 30-inch wide QXGA+ (2560 x 1600) LCD panel, and a 26-inch wide UXGA (1920 x 1200) LCD panel. The latest in TFT-LCD technology for notebook PCs will also be featured, including an ultra slim LCD panel which is just 6.7mm thick and the world’s largest 20.1-inch wide LCD panel.

--- Cut ---

Next-generation Displays

In addition to the aforementioned demonstrations, LG.Philips LCD will highlight the following prototypes for new technologies during FPD International 2006:

▪ 42-inch LCD panel for TVs with an impressive motion picture response time
▪ 32-inch LCD panel for TVs featuring a low power external electrode fluorescent lamp (EEFL) (68W)
▪ 32-inch LCD panel for full HDTVs incorporating LED Backlight Unit (BLU) with local dimming function for enhanced picture quality and contrast ratio
▪ 15-inch monitor LCD panel that features two viewing angles (178 and 80 degrees)

FPD International will be held at the Pacifico Yokohama from October 18 through 20 in Yokohama, Japan.

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AUO and CMO to show display technology advances at FPD International
17 October 2006

Both AU Optronics (AUO) and Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) will show a variety of display technology advances at FPD International 2006 in Yokohama, Japan, including new developments in viewing angle, contrast and color saturation.

AUO will be showcasing its latest TFT LCD innovations, including advanced MVA (AMVA) technology with low color washout and high contrast ratio of 2,500:1; HiColor technology with the achievement of high color saturation; AUO simulated pulsed driving (ASPD) technology with a blurred motion solution; and AUO picture enhancer (APE) technology featuring natural color images and clear depth of view.

Prototypes of the new display technologies from AUO include a 37-inch TV panel with a contrast ratio of more than 10,000:1, with the panel able to save up to 50% in power consumption by utilizing LED backlighting to control luminance depth and range.

A 4-inch LTPS (low temperature polysilicon) panel with sunlight readability and wide viewing angle will be shown for mobile device applications. A 2.2-inch handset panel with a contrast ratio of 14,000:1 will be shown, with the panel able to save up to 45% in power consumption. In addition, AUO will introduce a new 1.9-inch handset panel with a 1.3mm-thin module.

Furthermore, AUO will highlight a 180g, 12.1-inch notebook panel, which features 0.2mm thin glass substrate technology and white-LED backlight. Additionally, the maker will show a 19-inch panel 92% NTSC color gamut (using CCFL cold cathode fluorescent lamp) and a 20.1-inch panel with 105% NTSC color gamut (using white LED).

CMO, on the other hand, will exhibit a series of 17-inch widescreen notebook panels using RGB LED backlight technology, with the panels featuring wide UXGA resolution (1,920×1,200) and color saturation of at least 100% NTSC.

In addition, CMO will be exhibiting a 22-inch RGB LED backlight widescreen panel offering no mercury, power-saving features, and high color saturation. This panel offers WSXGA+ resolution (1,680×1,050), a 16:10 widescreen ratio and 800:1 contrast output. CMO will also show its adaptive insertion (AI) technology with a 24-inch monitor panel that has an 8ms response time.

For the TV segment, CMO will highlight a 47-inch panel with a RGB BLU and contrast of 50,000:1 between different black and white pictures, and 40,000:1 for the same frame. Other specifications of the panel include a 160% NTSC color gamut. Compared with conventional LED backlighting, this feature can provide a 45% wider gamut with the same illumination. The panel also reduces power consumption to only 60-70% of that of a conventional 47-inch LED-based panel, while allowing up 50% of the screen to be used.

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Samsung sees printing as key to lowering TFT LCD costs
19 October 2006

Samsung Electronics aims to reduced the cost of TFT LCD production to US$100 per square meter, down from the current US$1,500, by adopting printing techniques, according to Souk Jun-hyung, senior vice president of the Samsung Electronics LCD Business.

Using procedures such as rollable substrates, imprint and ink jet printing techniques, an extremely low-cost display can be created and will coexist will new products such as electronic-books (e-books) and flexible displays by 2010, Souk said.

Due to early operation of seventh-generation (7G) TFT LCD production, Samsung was able to push 40-inch panels (the main product at its 7G plants) to the mainstream and it is confident the 40-inch LCD TV segment will take 53% of the 40-inch-and-above TV market in 2006, Souk indicated.

A new 8G plant will start operations in October 2007, producing mainly 46- and 52-inch panels, with monthly capacity at 50,000 glass substrates, about 3.6 million 52-inch panels per year, Souk said.

Souk was speaking at FPD International 2006 in Yokohama Japan, which runs from October 18-20.

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CPT shows large panels and new LED backlighting technologies at FPD International
20 October 2006

Chunghwa Picture Tubes (CPT) is showing a variety of new panel applications and technologies at FPD International in Yokohama, Japan (October 18-20), including a 47-inch TV panel (to be rolled out in the first quarter of 2007), 80:000:1-contrast LED technology, and its first color filter (CF)-less LED backlighting technology.

Production of the new 47-inch panel will be cost efficient, as each of the glass substrates at CPT's sixth-generation (6G) plant can be cut into three 47-inch panels, compared to only two at 6G plants from other makers, CPT indicated. In addition, the full high-definition (HD) panel feature double frame rate and EMVA, which allows high contrast and quick response, while posessing wide viewing angles and keeping the color shift to a minimum.

In addition, CPT is showing an LED backlighting technology with area control, which can help improve the contrast ratio of a panel to 80:000:1. However, CPT said it currently has no mass production plan for the technology, as the present costs for LED backlighting are still high.

Furthermore, CPT is highlighting a 32-inch LED-backlit LCD panel using no CFs. Kuang-Lang Chen, vice president of CPT's TFT business R&D center, said the panel's power consumption is only 56W while brightness is as high as 350 nits, compared to average power consumption of 110W and brightness of only 150 nits.

CPT is also exhibiting a car-use panel that supports a wide range of temperatures, from 95 degree Celsius to minus 20 degree Celsius, along with a 32-inch panel with a 1ms response time (5.9ms motion picture response time, MPRT).

Car-use display makers from Europe have showed interest in the wide-temperature-range car-use panel while CPT is shipping samples of the 1ms panel to Japan.

In related news, CPT said it will develop 7- and 9-inch widescreen panels at its 4.5G plant.

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Japan and S. Korea panel makers competing at FPD international
20 October 2006

>>see original story for images

Panel makers from Japan and South Korea are competing for attention at FPD International 2006 in Yokohama, Japan (October 18-20) with panels that are attempting to stake claims on industry records.

Sharp is showing a 64-inch super-high resolution TFT LCD with a pixel counts of over eight million, but the company does not allow photographs to be taken of the panel.

LG.Philips LCD (LPL) is showing a variety of large-size panels, including a 20.1-inch notebook panel and a 30-inch monitor panel, with the company claiming that both panels are the industry's largest for their segment.

The South Korea-based maker is also highlighting a 32-inch backlight unit (BLU) prototype using low-power external electrode fluorescent lamp (EEFL) technology, which LPL claims features 10% less power consumption than its previous EEFL BLUs.

Seiko Epson is displaying a 7.1-inch QXGA flexible panel, which weights only 8.4 grams.

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[FPD International 2006] Philips Introduces World's First 120Hz Scanning HCFL BLU
20 October 2006

Philips is unveiling its proprietary BLU manufacturing technology, Aptura, in a booth designed to highlight the strengths of their technology. The world's first 42-inch 120Hz Scanning HCFL BLU is being demonstrated and its faster response time than plasma displays is being highlighted. The company also stressed that the new model is a BLU technology suitable for the upcoming full HD era because of its high contrast ratio, perfect motion handling and crisp colors. In addition, a 47-inch wide color gamut (WCG) model, incorporating Aptura technology, is also being showcased at the booth. This model, adopting a long-lifespan HCFL, delivers a NTSC color gamut of 94%, fast response time, and high efficiency. In addition, Philips is also attracting attention by displaying a 26-inch wide model achieving low power consumption, high luminance, high contrast ratio, and WCG through LED BLUs.

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[FPD International 2006] AUO Unveils Diverse Product Lineup with LED BLUs
20 October 2006

Taiwan's AU Optronics Corp. (AUO) unveiled a wide range of lineups boasting improved functionality through LED BLUs at the FPD International 2006. AUO claims that its 37-inch full HD LCD TV module features improved brightness and contrast ratio. Notably, the backlight brightness is adjustable for each spot of screen according to the image brightness, which is called 'high dynamic contrast display'; therefore, power consumption of LED BLUs could have been improved further, according to the company. In addition, its 20.1-inch WXGA and 22-inch WSXGA+ monitor modules have achieved the brightness of 220nit, up about 10% from products adopting CCFLs, and the depth of 2.9mm, the world's slimmest, by employing LED BLUs.

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All Samsung LCD monitors to be LED backlit by 2008, report says
27 October 2006

All LCD monitors produced by Samsung Electronics will be LED-based by 2008, according to a report from the Korean-language Digital Times.

Samsung recently introduced an LED-based 20.1-inch LCD monitor (SyncMaster XL20) in South Korea with a price tag of 1,780,000 won (US$1,878). The new model is set to hit Europe and the US in November and December, respectively, the report noted. The company also plans to launch a 24-inch LED-based LCD monitor in 2007, added the report.

The SyncMaster XL20 features a contrast ratio of 1,000:1, brightness of 250 cd/m2, response time of 8ms, viewing angle of 178 degrees and has a color gamut of 114%, according to a Japanese press release from Samsung in late September. Samsung will start offering the 20.1-inch LED-based monitor in Japan in the second half of November at a price tag of 158,000 yen (US$1,333), the press pointed out.

In addition to LCD monitor, Samsung is also using LED technology in LCD TVs. Last month, the company released a 40-inch LCD TV, which features a 146% color gamut and a 10,000:1 contrast ratio.

Last August, NEC announced a 21.3-inch (MuultiSync 2180) LCD monitor using LED as the light source. The monitor achieves over 100% of Adobe RGB and NTSC color scales, according to the company.

Worldwide shipments of LCD monitors will reach 129 million units in 2006, 3% of which will be LED-backlit devices, sources at LED makers estimated.
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http://www.digitimes.com/displays/a20061020A8037.html

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Chunghwa Picture Tubes (CPT) is showing a variety of new panel applications and technologies at FPD International in Yokohama, Japan (October 18-20), including a 47-inch TV panel (to be rolled out in the first quarter of 2007), 80:000:1-contrast LED technology, and its first color filter (CF)-less LED backlighting technology.

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http://www.behardware.com/articles/6...afterglow.html

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Partially unveiled at CeBIT 2006, 100 Hz technology is coming for LCDs. The idea is that monitors will no longer display 50 or 60 images per second but 100. Finally, LCD technology is considerably improving much more than going from 16 to 2ms. Under certain circumstances, the first 100 Hz LCD is as good as a CRT.

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I hope this article is just for PAL TVs. NTSC TVs should be 120Hz, not 100Hz.
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LCDs RULE !

CFL (Color Filter-Less) 120 hz HCG (High Color Gamut) Dynamic LED-BackLit Contrast Enhancement.

Look out Plasma & SED , the smart money is on LCD.
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What about number of colours produceable? This has been another weakness of LCDs, typically 8 bits each of RGB which means not quite enough to avoid false contouring in some scenes. Also it won't do much good to have a lower level of absolute black if there aren't enough low-end gradations available to make out the detail and avoid crushed blacks.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmcmahon View Post

What about number of colours produceable? This has been another weakness of LCDs, typically 8 bits each of RGB which means not quite enough to avoid false contouring in some scenes. Also it won't do much good to have a lower level of absolute black if there aren't enough low-end gradations available to make out the detail and avoid crushed blacks.

http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=2860
So the technology for much improved grayscale exists. Hopefully and soon it will become standard in LCDs.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmcmahon View Post

What about number of colours produceable? This has been another weakness of LCDs, typically 8 bits each of RGB which means not quite enough to avoid false contouring in some scenes. Also it won't do much good to have a lower level of absolute black if there aren't enough low-end gradations available to make out the detail and avoid crushed blacks.

Do you have any examples of 24 bit color being inadequate that you can positively attribute this assertion about colorspace? On computers, 24 bit (32 bit with alpha) has been standard for years for image work (16+ million colors).

I have seen constant banding on HDTVs (especially images with lots of sky or water) but have been chalking it up to the rampant overcompression for OTA, Satellite and cable signals. I have never seen banding on any "good" source (e.g. digital camera shots, scans, etc.) on any of my computers in the last 30 years. The only banding I have ever seen on a computer is when the video is set to 15 or 16 bit color (i.e. 5 bits for each of the three primaries), which is many orders of magnitude less colors -- 32-65k vs. 16 million.

I looked this up on Wikipedia, and it seems as if it might be more important on grey-scale images (256 discrete shades), but it seems a stretch for the average person to tell a difference on a static image, let alone a moving one. Anyway, just curious...
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Well, 24 bit colour has been the standard for years in computers, as it's "good enough" for most applications e.g. office apps, games, etc. I was into computer graphics and image processing in the late 80s, and it was "well known" that 8 bit colour was not quite good enough. I believe CGI is all processed using 10 or even 12-bit colour today for this very reason.

The only source I can cite is Poynton, who gives 460 intensity levels as being necessary to exceed human vision along a 100:1 contrast ratio. This is computed from the basis that humans can distinguish a 1% difference between two shades of gray side-by-side. 9-bit colour would be sufficient.

http://www.poynton.com/notes/colour_.../GammaFAQ.html

Poynton has his detractors:

http://www.aim-dtp.net/aim/calibrati...chapter_15.htm

However the main point of the detractor seems to be that Poynton's scaling is unnecessarily fine in the dark end, and not good enough at the light end of the scale. He also seems to be saying that the 100:1 contrast ratio isn't good enough. That seems to imply that more bits would likely be needed.

Note that we are talking about precision and not colour gamut here. FWIW I can see banding occassionally on my TV, especially in gray-scale images. You can also do a test yourself, just display an image that shows smooth transitions between all possible colours and you will probably be able to see bands. If you don't have such an image handy use mine:

http://www.sharemation.com/~dmcmahon/wheel.png

Look at the grayscale wedges near the bottom. I can see horizontal bands on the wedge on the left in the darker portion of it, and vertical bands on the right wedge in the lighter portion. I can also see horizontal or vertical banding in most of the other wedges, too. The banding is faint and would not bother me on a TV, but there's no denying it's there. I will accept your point that most of the banding I've seen is due to compression artifacts etc. as I have never seen them in a moving image from a a clean source such as DVD. My TV is a CRT.
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Thanks for the very detailed response. As you point out, it is hard to miss the banding on the grey scale blends/gradients. I still feel the majority of banding we see on broadcast HDTV images is due to the overcompression, however. One note -- often sound and video processing is done with more bits (i.e. 10, 12 instead of 8) to minimize the inevitable rounding errors during processing. Also, to your point -- I believe medical imaging is now often using 10bits per pixel (especially on monochrome images such as X-rays, etc.).
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LGE to mass produce 100-inch LCD TV soon
2 November 2006




LG Electronics (LGE) is scheduling the time for mass production in overseas market, the Korea-based company noted. Production cost for the 100-inch LCD TV is over US$150,000, said LGE in a company press release.

Nevertheless, prices for the 100-inch LCD TV have not yet been determined, the release said.

LGE recently developed the 100-inch LCD TV and the model will enter 2007 Guinness Book as the world's largest LCD TV, according to the release.

The 100-inch LCD TV, with panel from LG.Philips LCD, features a maximum 3,000:1 contrast ratio, color reproduction of 92%, viewing angle of 180 degrees and response time of 5ms, said the company. The TV is offering a 6.22 million-pixel picture quality with resolution of 1,920x1,080, said the company.

LG.Philips LCD debuted its 100-inch LCD TV panel in March 2006.

In ultra large flat-panel TV competition, PDP (plasma display panel) technology is so far the winner. In July, Panasonic (the brand name of Matsushita Electric Industrial) said it will start offering 103-inch PDP TVs, the world's largest, with a retail selling price (RSP) of US$69,999.95, in Christmas 2006.

The TH-103PZ600U features resolution of 1,920×1,080 and a contrast ratio of 4,000:1, with panel size equivalent to four 50-inch PDPs, according to Panasonic.

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AUO may roll out 65-inch TV panels in 1H 2007
20 November 2006

AU Optronics (AUO) will introduce 65-inch LCD TV panels perhaps as early as the second quarter of 2007, as it rolls out its first panels over 50 inches, according to market sources.

Although AUO has started mass production at its 7.5G plant ahead of Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO), AUO still lags its major Taiwan competitor in production of 50-inch and larger panels. CMO recently launched 52- and 56-inch panels, while AUO's largest TV panels are 47 inches.

But the market sources claimed that AUO will launch 65-inch panels in June 2007, skipping the 50- to 59-inch segment. AUO's first 52-inch panels may not hit the market until the second half of 2007, the sources added.

The sources pointed out that 52-inch panels are not the best cuts for 7.5G substrates. And the chief reasons for AUO to roll out 65-inch panels first are that an economic cut for a 6G substrate is two 65-inch panels, and the company wants to show its technological prowess, the sources speculated.

AUO will also resume production of 46-inch panels in the first quarter of next year. While production of 46-inch panels stopped in the second quarter of this year, AUO plans to start making them at its new 7.5G plant with the aim to vie for orders from Samsung Electronics, the sources said.

The sources added that AUO 7.5G plant's capacity will reach 60,000 substrates per month by the end of 2007, up from 10,000 substrates monthly in the fourth quarter this year. Its 6G facilities' capacity will have a monthly capacity of 210,000 substrates by the end of 2007, compared to 120,000 substrates currently. For its 5G facilities, the total capacity will be 315,000-325,000 substrates each month by the end of 2007.

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LED to narrow price gap with CCFL in 2007
6 December 2006

The price gap between LCD panels using LEDs as a backlight source and those using cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs) is likely to narrow to 1.5-2 times by the end of 2007 at the soonest, compare to three times in 2006, according to Vincent Hsiao, CEO of LED maker UPEC Electronics, an affiliate of Highlink Technology, which is under the UMC (United Microelectronics Corporation) group.

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CMO lights up first 7.5G-made 42-inch panel, paper says
12 December 2006

Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) successfully turned on its first 42-inch panel made from its 7.5-generation (7.5G) plant at the beginning of this month, with volume production to commence next March to meet peak season demand in the second half of 2007, according to the Chinese-language Commercial Times.

The panel maker started equipment installation at the plant this October and the turn-on schedule was earlier than expected, the paper said.

CMO was unavailable for comment by the time of publication.

The 7.5G plant was originally expected to enter first-phase volume production at the end of the second quarter of next year, processing 50,000 1,950×2,250 glass substrates per month, the company said earlier. The company has delayed the second-phase expansion of the plant to 2008. Each glass substrate at the plant can be cut into eight 42-inch panels or six 46-inch panels, with 47-inch panels also being among potential products at the plant, the maker was quoted by the Commercial Times as saying.

Before the production of 42-inch panels from the 7.5G plant, CMO already started providing 42-inch panels from its 5G plant.

CMO currently is supplying its 42-inch panels to Sharp and Westinghouse, the paper noted.

In July, the Chinese-language Economic Daily News (EDN) reported Sharp added CMO as a 42-inch panel supplier and noted that each substrate at CMO's 5G plant can be cut into two 42-inch panels.

Last November, sources said CMO is the main panel supplier for Westinghouse, while affiliate Nexgen Mediatech assembles most of the LCD TVs for Westinghouse.

AU Optronics (AUO) is the first among Taiwan-based panel makers to start using a 7.5G plant to produce 42-inch panels. The maker successfully turned on its first 42-inch panel at its 7.5G TFT LCD and color filter (CF) production facility in August, according to the company.

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Sharp's AQUOS LC-32GS is "world's first" 1080p 32-inch LCD: why?
12 December 2006




We've seen more than our share of 32-inch panels pushing a 1366x768 pixel resolution. Fine, that works. However, just as pixel-count sells digital cameras, it unfortunately also sells HDTVs to the uninitiated. So, along comes Sharp with their grand hopes of re-directing your fat wad into their coffers with this, the "Full HD" LC-32GS from the AQUOS G series. According to Sharp, this is the industry's first (to ship) 32-inch 1920x1080 LCD TV. That's right, 1080p which most will find a waste of pixel density (and almighty dollars) at that screen size and typical viewing distance.

No doubt, this set does bring the specs: that "world's highest" 2000:1 contrast ratio we've seen on other ASV panels, 450cd/m2 brightness, 176-degree visibility, 6-ms response, integrated digital/analog terrestrial tuners, and a sweet bevy of jacks including 2x HDMI with Familink support, 2x Japanese D4, 2x S-Video, 4x composite, and a much appreciated DVI-I input for digitally tethering your computer and making use of those extra pixels.

Ships December 22nd in Japan with either a pair of side mounted, or single under-bezel speaker for -- get this -- a 32-inch premium price of ¥280,000 (about $2,395). Expect to hear rest-of-world dates and prices any day now.

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CES 2007: Westinghouse to show Quad HDTV
3 January 2007

Pre CES 2007 coverage - Las Vegas (LV) - Don't say we didn't warn you. If you just exchanged your savings account for a shiny new 1080p LCD TV and you are showing it off to your neighbors, be aware that your bragging rights may be fading away by the middle of the year.

Quad HDTVs have been on display here and there in Asia in 2006 and finally will be making it across the Pacific now. Westinghouse is the first company to announce that it will have such a TV on display at its booth. It will be based on LCD technology and come with a 56" panel. According to the company, the TV will use 2160p resolution (3840 x 2160 progessive) and offer "stunning, never-before seen picture reproduction."

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CES 2007: Samsung exhibits next-generation LCD displays
7 January 2007

Samsung Electronics is exhibiting next-generation LCD panels at the 2007 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas (January 8-11).

Particularly noteworthy are new Samsung panels, including a double-sided 2.22-inch widescreen LCD that shows different images on both sides of the same screen for mobile applications, a 70-inch full high-definition (HD) LCD TV panel for the home and an 82-inch digital information display (DID) for public settings.

Samsung's new 2.22-inch double-sided LCD – being exhibited for the first time at CES 2007 – is the first product to display two different images back to back in an ultra-thin mechanical package. It is 1mm slimmer than typical display modules (3.85mm) used in mobile phones, enabling truly differentiated multimedia handset designs. Other commercially available double-sided LCDs simply consist of two panels placed one on top of the other that can only display the reverse image of identical screen content.

Meanwhile, Samsung is introducing "the largest" (70-inch) full high-definition (HD) LCD for TV use. At CES 2007, Samsung is supplementing its 40- and 46-inch standards by exhibiting a new 52-inch size standard that reproduces full HD video images at 120Hz with enhanced motion picture response time (MPRT). The 52-inch panel will be produced later this year on the company's eighth-generation (8G) LCD manufacturing line.

For the DID market, the company is demonstrating several products that enable system designers to mount LCD panels adjacent to each other with minimal distance separating the display's active viewing area. These include a 46-inch touch-screen DID, a 40-inch model with narrow bezels left and right, a 46-inch panel also for use with narrow bezel designs, as well as 57- and 82-inch DIDs.

Finally, Samsung is displaying a wide portfolio of LCD panels for monitors including a 30-inch widescreen model, which it claims is the industry's largest LCD panel of its type. A variety of graphically-rich, ultra-slim high-resolution notebook panels are being shown that are suited to enhance the viewing experience when used in conjunction with the new Windows Vista operating system (OS).

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CES 2007: Makers highlight ultra large-size 1080p TVs
8 January 2007

Leading display vendors such as Sharp, Sony and Samsung Electronics are pushing large-size full high-definition TVs (HDTVs) at the ongoing CES show in Las Vegas (January 8-11).

Sharp's 108in LCD takes record at a price



< 070108_Sharp_108in_LCD.jpg >









Later this year, anyone with $20,000 to spare and a really big wall at home might want to consider Sharp's new claimant to the world's-biggest-TV crown, the newly unveiled 108in Aquos LCD it was pimping at CES on Sunday.

Sharp reckons that it's significant that the new telly takes LCDs to a size no plasma has ever reached but we all know this is really about bragging rights.

More interesting is the reason for the stratospheric cost — the glass substrate panels screens are cut from at Sharp's factory are large enough to accommodate just one of the 108-inchers. By contrast, eight 46in LCDs can be made from the same panel.


Sony displays 70-inch Bravia LCD TV




Sony recently introduced a 70-inch LCD TV, the world's largest TV compliant with x.v.Color technology here at the CES show in Las Vegas.

The new Bravia KDL-70XBR3 model will be available spring 2007 for about US$33,000, according to the company.

Image quality is enhanced further with the new xvYCC technology, which Sony has branded x.v.Color. This technology was established as an industry standard by the CES 2006, according to Sony. (Note: xvYCC technology refers to the international standard for wide color space within moving images).

The 70-inch model is currently the largest screen size in Sony's Braiva LCD line. The TV features resolution of 1,920×1,080 and Motionflow 120 Hz technology with motion compensation, Triluminos LED backlight, as well as a 10-bit panel, which allows for an increase in the TV's gradation level by 64 times from 8-bit panels. The TV also has viewing angle of 178-degree and delivers a dynamic contrast ratio of 7,000:1.

The set includes three HDMI inputs and a PC input which are 1080p compatible, as well as two HD component inputs.

Sony's Bravia LCD TV lineup includes screen size of 52, 46, 40, 32, 26 and 23 inches.

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CES 2007: Westinghouse shows off the Quad HDTV - update
8 January 2007



The super-resolution 2160p Quad HDTV was showing off a graphic-intensive
tech demo showing what oil companies can do with the display.


Westinghouse has a fairly modest booth at this year's CES, but there were some things that really stood out, most notably the Quad HDTV that was announced a few days before the show. That, along with a handful of new 1080p TVs and high-definition computer monitors are headlining the first batch of new 2007 releases, underscoring the future trend for the digital division of Westinghouse.

Of course, the Quad HDTV was our first target at the Westinghouse booth. The 52" TV runs a super high-resolution of 2160p (3840 x 2160 pixels). In absolute numbers, the device is running a stunning 8.3 megapixels - four times more than 1080p TVs (1920x1080p) and more than twice the resolution of Dell's, HP's and Apple's 30" desktop LCDs. So, what do you get from this resolution, especially if HD DVD and Blu-ray are running only 1080p anyway?

According to Westinghouse, the TV does not really target the consumer market, but high-end industrial applications. What we saw was an animation of an oil company viewing a digital version of a mining site. And even at this very specialized application, the difference to the best 1080p we saw at CES appeared to be marginal, at least to our eyes. However, of course you do see a much clearer picture when compared to some lower-priced 1080p TVs. Westinghouse said that it has begun taking orders for the 2160p. However, the TV will not come to the consumer market anytime soon. We heard that the TV is selling for around $50,000 at this time.

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Bigger & biggest HDTVs: Sharp's 108 vs. Samsung's 102
9 January 2007



Samsung 102" Plasma



Sharp 108" LCD


It's hard to decide. We're seeing so many great HDTVs every day like these two giants -- and some not so giant -- but still, which one of these screens would we rather take home? On the left we've got Samsung's old school 102-inch plasma, on the right Sharp's new 108-inch 1080p Aquos LCD. Some people could be content with a mere 102-inch or even 103-inch screen and prefer plasma to LCD, but with 120Hz motion and other advancements coming off of Sharp's 8th-generation manufacturing line its impossible to say no to the new size king in town. Check out the gallery for a couple more pictures of both.
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post #25 of 62 Old 11-02-2006, 01:54 PM
 
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LGE to mass produce 100-inch LCD TV soon
2 November 2006




LG Electronics (LGE) is scheduling the time for mass production in overseas market, the Korea-based company noted. Production cost for the 100-inch LCD TV is over US$150,000, said LGE in a company press release.

Nevertheless, prices for the 100-inch LCD TV have not yet been determined, the release said.

LGE recently developed the 100-inch LCD TV and the model will enter 2007 Guinness Book as the world's largest LCD TV, according to the release.

The 100-inch LCD TV, with panel from LG.Philips LCD, features a maximum 3,000:1 contrast ratio, color reproduction of 92%, viewing angle of 180 degrees and response time of 5ms, said the company. The TV is offering a 6.22 million-pixel picture quality with resolution of 1,920x1,080, said the company.

LG.Philips LCD debuted its 100-inch LCD TV panel in March 2006.

In ultra large flat-panel TV competition, PDP (plasma display panel) technology is so far the winner. In July, Panasonic (the brand name of Matsushita Electric Industrial) said it will start offering 103-inch PDP TVs, the world's largest, with a retail selling price (RSP) of US$69,999.95, in Christmas 2006.

The TH-103PZ600U features resolution of 1,920×1,080 and a contrast ratio of 4,000:1, with panel size equivalent to four 50-inch PDPs, according to Panasonic.

I'm not excited about this at all, 3000-1 CR is a step backwards.
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post #26 of 62 Old 11-03-2006, 08:25 AM
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I'm not excited about this at all, 3000-1 CR is a step backwards.

Iso,

Keep up the good work.

Who let the SED Kool Aid drinker in here?
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post #27 of 62 Old 11-06-2006, 03:49 PM
 
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Iso,

Keep up the good work.

Who let the SED Kool Aid drinker in here?

I'll be drinking the bubbly by 2008!!
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post #28 of 62 Old 12-06-2006, 12:26 PM
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http://www.brightsidetech.com/products/dr37p.php

Note the 16-bit per color, not 16-bit color -- that's essentially 48-bit color.

Besides their own displays, I believe they are also licensing the technology so that other LCD makers will also be able to take advantage of it. Very cool stuff -- this is the future.
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post #29 of 62 Old 12-06-2006, 05:50 PM
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Also 1680W maximum power usage.
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post #30 of 62 Old 01-04-2007, 11:43 PM
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Thread Update:

3 January 2007: CES 2007: Westinghouse to show Quad HDTV

Presumably the same as the Chi Mei panel in the article above. - DR
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