Wall Mounting. Don't put power cord in the wall - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 112 Old 07-30-2007, 05:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Ok, I have been reading several threads on this site, current and past. I've noticed a number of folks are mounting their flat screen TV's on the wall and asking about how and what cables to run. Well, many of the posts also have questions and replies regarding the power cord. I read many post that some thought or could make it work with running the cord in the wall. I'm concerned when I read those with the danger in doing that is actually high. The number 1 cause for most household fires is old or faulty extension cords that dry out over time and short out.
The reason for this thread is to alert others of the danger in doing so, be safe not cheap and stupid.

For the record, the NEC National Electric Code does not allow flexible cords that carry electricity to be in or through a wall.

Here's the CODE:
NEC ARTICLE 400 Flexible Cords and Cables
I. General 400.1 Scope.
This article covers general requirements, applications, and construction specifications for flexible cords and flexible cables.
400.8 Uses Not Permitted.
Flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following:

(1)As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure

(2)Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors

(3)Where run through doorways, windows, or similar openings

(4)Where attached to building surfaces
Exception: Flexible cord and cable shall be permitted to be attached to building surfaces in accordance with the provisions of 368.8.

(5)Where concealed by walls, floors, or ceilings or located above suspended or dropped ceilings

(6)Where installed in raceways, outside of the wall, floor, ceiling except as otherwise permitted in this Code
So, I'm posting this to hopefully keep you and others safe.
There are two products on the market designed specifically for in-wall electrical wiring and outlets to meet NEC CODE.

One is made by Panamax it's $299.95
http://www.panamax.com/products.cfm?...il&id=221&ly=h

The other is PowerBridge it's $49.00
http://powerbridgesolution.com/aboutpowerbridge.html

They both provide the solution needed to meet CODE. I have the PowerBridge myself and they offer different wall plate colors and cheaper.

Look at these products, they meet CODE and protect your TV and your home from potential damage.

FYI note, if you do decide to run your power cord or an extension cord in the wall and it causes a fire, your home/renter insurance will probably NOT pay any damage claim as their investigators will determine a code violation.

Before you all hit me with the question regarding your A/V cables... They are LOW voltage and not under the NEC code. However, I will stress that some areas local building codes may require CL2/3 rated inwall low voltage cables, especially if you are building new and the home is due for an inspection.

Ok all that said, the other point to all this is to have your expensive TV protected by a real surge protector/conditioner, and both of these products will allow that too, so, extra bonus!

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #2 of 112 Old 07-30-2007, 11:56 PM
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Thanks for posting the link to PowerBridge. I had no idea such a product existed that solves my LCD mounting dilemma perfectly. Will def pick up a set soon. Thanks again.

Now if I can only find a wall plate that accommodates one HDMI and two banana connectors on one plate, I'm set. I mean, am I the only one who wants to mount their LCD on the wall and mount the center channel right below while at the same time wishes to hide all the cables and wires? How do most people mount their center channel and then hide the wiring?
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post #3 of 112 Old 07-31-2007, 08:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerdave View Post

Now if I can only find a wall plate that accommodates one HDMI and two banana connectors on one plate, I'm set. I mean, am I the only one who wants to mount their LCD on the wall and mount the center channel right below while at the same time wishes to hide all the cables and wires? How do most people mount their center channel and then hide the wiring?


Do a search for "keystone" at monoprice or google.
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post #4 of 112 Old 07-31-2007, 09:43 AM
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Not quite the only way to meet code.

You could also use cheap wiremold-like products you see in classrooms or simply do it right by tapping the closest outlet (in-wall) and running flex, conduit, or typical "romex" to a new outlet.

Your point about not sinking extension cords into walls is a good one, though... but the fire risk is typically due to devices that draw more juice like heaters, blowdryers, and window A/Cs.

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post #5 of 112 Old 07-31-2007, 10:07 AM
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Wow. Thanks. I never even thought..I just figured I dig out a hole in the wall behind the TV and stuff cables through it, cut another hole and pull them out & plug them in the nearest wall outlet.
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post #6 of 112 Old 07-31-2007, 10:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonDotCom View Post

Huh? Those solutions are slightlymisleading and are not the only way to meet code.

You could also use cheap wiremold-like products you see in classrooms or simply do it right by tapping the closest outlet (in-wall) and running flex, conduit, or typical "romex" to a new outlet.

Your point about not sinking extension cords into walls is a good one, though... but the fire risk is typically due to devices that draw more juice like heaters, blowdryers, and window A/Cs.

Sorry if you feel these solutions are misleading in anyway. My intention was to alert people to NOT put the TV power cord in the wall first place and these products solve that concern if they don't want to see any wires, like I did when I installed my LCD on the wall.

The best part of these two products is they are the ONLY SAFE SOLUTION that is a REAL solution that isn't some "rigged" together dangerous plug connected to romex sticking out the wall or a dual male plug into standard recepticals, I've read the post from a few months back that suggested that! YIKES!

The other HUGE benefit, is these 2 products are the ONLY SOLUTION that will allow connection of the expensive flat screen TV to a surge protector/conditioner/UPS that many people already have with their main AV equipment.

Cheap wiremold-like products solves the problem of OUTSIDE the wall, yes, but the purpose of this is for those who want their wires hidden inside the wall.
Tapping from the nearest outlet will NOT provide any protection to the TV.
These 2 products are the BEST solution to do that for wall mounted HDTV's. I've actually installed one and it is the BEST way to go.

Large flat panel TV's draw plenty of juice and the power cord does and can get warmed up, especially inside of an insulated wall. No licensed eletrician in his/her right mind would ever install a flexible power/extension cord in a wall.

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #7 of 112 Old 07-31-2007, 12:34 PM
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Yes, agreed.

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post #8 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 08:13 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerdave View Post

Thanks for posting the link to PowerBridge. I had no idea such a product existed that solves my LCD mounting dilemma perfectly. Will def pick up a set soon. Thanks again.

Now if I can only find a wall plate that accommodates one HDMI and two banana connectors on one plate, I'm set. I mean, am I the only one who wants to mount their LCD on the wall and mount the center channel right below while at the same time wishes to hide all the cables and wires? How do most people mount their center channel and then hide the wiring?

Hey Dave,

Your welcome for the info about Powerbridge. Glad to know others need it too and see the purpose of doing it right and safe.
I didn't know of the product either until I did some research and it solved my problem of wanting to have my TV protected and to safely have electricity in the wall.

Dave, guess what I found for you....

You want a wall plate for HDMI and speaker wire??

Check this site out, they custom make what ever you want, another great find by the HDTVlover!
http://www.supercellaudio.com/HDMI%20wall%20plates.htm

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #9 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 08:29 AM
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Great Find!!!! Thanks, I don't need the in wall power as I just have a cut-out but for my bedroom ( where I am moving my other current living room TV ).

Can't thank you enough.

Sidenote - as someone who has seen what an inproper/jury-rigged wiring job can do, I strongly urge people who just "fish it behind a while" to rethink it.

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post #10 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 11:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgreenpc View Post

Great Find!!!! Thanks, I don't need the in wall power as I just have a cut-out but for my bedroom ( where I am moving my other current living room TV ).

Can't thank you enough.

Sidenote - as someone who has seen what an inproper/jury-rigged wiring job can do, I strongly urge people who just "fish it behind a while" to rethink it.

You're welcome rgreenpc.. Thanks for adding to the cause to alert people NOT to put the TV power cord in the wall and "rigging romex" It's such a bad idea and unsafe, but some think it's ok... makes no sense to me...

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #11 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 03:24 PM
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OMFG...people actually run appliance power cords behind walls? That's a disaster waiting to happen. No licensed electrician who wanted to stay a licensed electrician for long would do anything as stupid as that.
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post #12 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 06:07 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MitsuDude View Post

OMFG...people actually run appliance power cords behind walls? That's a disaster waiting to happen. No licensed electrician who wanted to stay a licensed electrician for long would do anything as stupid as that.

I know, I don't understand it either, that's why I started this thread in the first place, thanks for your comment MitsuDude, hopefully we can help others from burning their homes down or injuring somebody.

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #13 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 06:37 PM
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Good info, never ceases to amaze me how people will find more and more creative ways to burn down thier houses. If your going to spend the money on a nice hdtv then spend a few extra bucks and wire it correctley. It will save you trouble in the long run !!

Ive seen good TV's and Ive seen bad TV's the only thing im sure of is that Ive seen them !!
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post #14 of 112 Old 08-01-2007, 10:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jmaximus View Post

Good info, never ceases to amaze me how people will find more and more creative ways to burn down thier houses. If your going to spend the money on a nice hdtv then spend a few extra bucks and wire it correctley. It will save you trouble in the long run !!

Thanks for your comment, hopefully this important info will change some peoples minds as to the seriousness of not playing with "fire" by installing the TV powercord inside the wall and there are safe products available to keep them safe, without costing an arm and leg, or their home.

I think maybe some folks just don't know about the NEC Code, and some think they can save a buck on something allot more important then what cables they should use for the best picture.

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #15 of 112 Old 08-02-2007, 04:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVlover45 View Post

The best part of these two products is they are the ONLY SAFE SOLUTION that is a REAL solution that isn't some "rigged" together dangerous plug connected to romex sticking out the wall or a dual male plug into standard recepticals, I've read the post from a few months back that suggested that! YIKES!

The other HUGE benefit, is these 2 products are the ONLY SOLUTION that will allow connection of the expensive flat screen TV to a surge protector/conditioner/UPS that many people already have with their main AV equipment.

HDTVlover,

I really like that Powerbridge solution, but these two are not the "ONLY" solutions. You could (or have a electrician) add a repectacle behind the TV. Leviton makes surge suppressing receptacles that would add protection (hospitals use them a lot, I think). The Leviton receptacle costs about $40, so it's in the same ball park as the Powerbridge.

Where I see the Powerbridge having an advantage over a new receptacle is in situations where an existing receptacle is not in the same wall chase, you may have to cross drill through some studs. With the Powerbridge, you run the IN/OUT plates in the same chase, then the extra power cord can run to your UPS/surge suppressor/etc.

With that said, I will give the Powerbridge a good look when I get around to wall mounting my TV. I never realized how many "projects" just pop up when you become a home owner.

ft
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post #16 of 112 Old 08-02-2007, 08:47 AM
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Thanks for all of the great info!

I have a few questions regarding my installation:

My flat panel display is mounted onto a brick wall (was once an external wall but is now covered in a room.) Before I mounted I simply removed a brick behind where the mount is and another brick about 3.5 feet down near the floor where the components are. This leaves two brick-sized holes (both completely hidden by the devices) through which to run cable.

I'm simply running the power cable through the holes and actually would prefer not to have any kind of terminals or connectors (everything is nice and open now). Since the PowerBridge cable is somehow approved to be behind the wall could I just use that and not the boxes (i.e. as an extension cord?) Better yet, since most of the power cables for the devices are standard is it possible to get a special version of a power cable that would meet code and could be put behind the wall?

-Aaron
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post #17 of 112 Old 08-02-2007, 12:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OreoJoe View Post

Where I live, it is standard practice to use non-metallic sheath cable, aka NM cable. You should check the National Electrical Code (NEC) that specifies the minimum acceptable level of safety. Some areas have their own building codes (NYC, Chicago, ...).

http://www.nfpa.org/freecodes/free_a....asp?id=7005SB

Awesome OreoJoe! I recall the instructions for the Powerbridge said that same thing, they reccomend checking with the local code regarding what type of romex wire can be installed in the wall. Probably why they don't include regular romex, however, I think few places require NM cable, I thought that was mostly for commercial application and not so much residential.

Thanks for the info!

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post #18 of 112 Old 08-02-2007, 02:23 PM
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This is interesting, can someone explain the concern here. Why is Romex less dangerous than the typical heavy duty power cord which is normally supplied with a LCD TV?

Thanks Bob
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post #19 of 112 Old 08-02-2007, 07:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ftaok View Post

HDTVlover,

I really like that Powerbridge solution, but these two are not the "ONLY" solutions. You could (or have a electrician) add a repectacle behind the TV. Leviton makes surge suppressing receptacles that would add protection (hospitals use them a lot, I think). The Leviton receptacle costs about $40, so it's in the same ball park as the Powerbridge.

Where I see the Powerbridge having an advantage over a new receptacle is in situations where an existing receptacle is not in the same wall chase, you may have to cross drill through some studs. With the Powerbridge, you run the IN/OUT plates in the same chase, then the extra power cord can run to your UPS/surge suppressor/etc.

With that said, I will give the Powerbridge a good look when I get around to wall mounting my TV. I never realized how many "projects" just pop up when you become a home owner.

ft

Hey ft..

Some how I've been wrong in my original post that there are only two solutions.. I meant to make the point there are only two that I found that allow full protection to the TV that meet code. I guess I need to edit the original post.

I'm finding some post recently on other threads that the built-in outlet with surge protection outlet you mention is a good way to go. Not so sure...
First, I finally got to see what that unit from leviton is. It's not much really. Here's what I found.
The leviton website has no spec as to what level of surge protection it has. It's very small so anyone can assume it can't have much protection. I wouldn't trust it to protect my $2600.00 LCD TV. (I bought it last year, of course before the big price drops!)
Second, having that leviton "branched" from another outlet will have no return protection to that other outlet either, not that is a big deal, but I read several posts that thought maybe it would.
Third, even though that leviton is in the same "ballpark" price, it's not a complete solution as far as it's just one connection outlet, no power inlet, or cord to plug into a real surge protector, so $40 for the leviton by itself vs. $50 for a Powerbridge complete kit? To me that's a no brainer. I'm very happy that I found and installed powerbridge after reading all the other solutions people have tried, that don't seem very safe or quality.

Also, not sure that the Powerbridge will only work within the same wall chase as you stated. You could install the powerbridge inlet anywhere you can run the romex, just as you would need to run your AV cables to your AV equipment, that's what I did and my TV is not located at the same chase as my equipment, infact it's off centered in the next chase.

Hey good luck with all those new home projects,,, thankfully I'm over that phase...

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #20 of 112 Old 08-02-2007, 08:34 PM
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ok, these are both very good pieces of equipment for those of you who don't want to do it "correctly" as in have an electrician, or follow the electricians advice and add a actual outlet from the closest circuit or on a dedicated circuit.

The only reason I see using one of these items is if you bought one of those insanely expensive Power conditioner/surge protector thingies and want to plug the TV into that but don't want to mount it on the wall behind the TV.

My "
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post #21 of 112 Old 08-03-2007, 04:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVlover45 View Post

I'm finding some post recently on other threads that the built-in outlet with surge protection outlet you mention is a good way to go. Not so sure...
First, I finally got to see what that unit from leviton is. It's not much really. Here's what I found.
The leviton website has no spec as to what level of surge protection it has. It's very small so anyone can assume it can't have much protection. I wouldn't trust it to protect my $2600.00 LCD TV. (I bought it last year, of course before the big price drops!)
Second, having that leviton "branched" from another outlet will have no return protection to that other outlet either, not that is a big deal, but I read several posts that thought maybe it would.

HDTVlover, I fully understand that the Leviton device would only protect the items plugged into it, namely the TV. I would have a separate surge suppressor for all of the other components.
Quote:


Third, even though that leviton is in the same "ballpark" price, it's not a complete solution as far as it's just one connection outlet, no power inlet, or cord to plug into a real surge protector, so $40 for the leviton by itself vs. $50 for a Powerbridge complete kit? To me that's a no brainer. I'm very happy that I found and installed powerbridge after reading all the other solutions people have tried, that don't seem very safe or quality.

I respectfully disagree about the Leviton not being a complete system. As long as you are confident in the Leviton's ability to protect devices, then it's complete. No need for any additional cords, etc.

Quote:


Also, not sure that the Powerbridge will only work within the same wall chase as you stated. You could install the powerbridge inlet anywhere you can run the romex, just as you would need to run your AV cables to your AV equipment, that's what I did and my TV is not located at the same chase as my equipment, infact it's off centered in the next chase.

I think you misunderstood me on this one, or maybe my reply was too confusing (I do have a tendency to do that). What I was saying is that the Powerbridge has a big advantage over the Leviton in situations where the the powered receptacle and the use point behind the TV are not in the same chase. For DIYers like me, the less you have to cross drill into studs, the better.

For example, if you want the Leviton receptacle behind the TV in a certain chase and the powered receptacle is in another, you would have to cross drill at least one stud, cut an extra hole (or two) in the drywall, fish some romex ... That can be quite a job for a weekend project.

With the Powerbridge, you just put the INLET and OUTLET boxes within the same chase, then run the second extension power cord to the powered receptacle (or surge suppressor). For most installations, I would suspect that there would be no need to run the INLET and OUTLET in different chases. NOTE - this would work best if there is a media stand (or similar) to cover the OUTLET box and subsequent power cords.

I am seriously considering the Powerbridge as my solution. One other advantage that I see is that you can do the complete installation without turning off the power to the receptacles, since all of the install work is non-powered. I'll probably turn off the power anyway since I am very afraid of electricity ... who knows, I might cut into a power line with my drywall saw ...

Seriously, thanks for the link to this product. It will be a very clean solution for my gear.

ft
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post #22 of 112 Old 08-03-2007, 09:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by realred2 View Post

ok, these are both very good pieces of equipment for those of you who don't want to do it "correctly" as in have an electrician, or follow the electricians advice and add a actual outlet from the closest circuit or on a dedicated circuit.

The only reason I see using one of these items is if you bought one of those insanely expensive Power conditioner/surge protector thingies and want to plug the TV into that but don't want to mount it on the wall behind the TV.

Thanks realred2 for your comments.

But in response, how are the Powerbridge and the panamax not doing correctly? They are UL approved, meet NEC compliance and the primary advantage over just having an electrician install a unprotected outlet receptacle behind the TV having a full surge protecting "thingy" plugged in to these products to protect the most expensive part of the system, the TV.

So, i appriciate your comment, but I have to go with these products as the BEST solution for having power in the wall for wall mounted TV's.

By the way, if someone isn't "skilled" in installing these products, which I did myself, because there was not any direct wiring to any "live" electricity, they could have an electrician install them.

Thanks again!

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post #23 of 112 Old 08-03-2007, 03:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob_m10 View Post

This is interesting, can someone explain the concern here. Why is Romex less dangerous than the typical heavy duty power cord which is normally supplied with a LCD TV?

Thanks Bob


Hi Bob,
I missed your post from yesterday, but I see oreojoe answered somewhat to you.

I know at first I didn't understand the difference until I aksed.


I wanted to add to oreojoe's posts, the reason for ROMEX inside you walls now connecting all your electrical outlets/switches/light...ect... is because ROMEX is solid wire that doesn't flex or could wear out and having SOLID wire with the proper guage usually 12 or 14 is designed to carry electricty.

OK, so does a power cord right...??? well, a TV power cord and extension cords are NOT solid wire and are flexible and are not HARDWIRED to the device, thus if having a flexible cord sticking through the wall were to be pulled or yanked or whatever, it could cause a short and because it's stranded wire and not solid, a fire could start and burn your whole house down... The #1 cause for household fires in the US is due to power extension cords that over time dry out and short.

So, why risk it by running the TV cord in the wall..
Your current home and for all that matter ALL buildings in the US are wired with ROMEX for many reasons not just listed here.

So, DON'T RUN THE POWERCORD or an extension cord in the wall, it's against NEC and fire codes.

Good luck Bob...

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #24 of 112 Old 08-03-2007, 09:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by as6o View Post

Thanks for all of the great info!

I have a few questions regarding my installation:

My flat panel display is mounted onto a brick wall (was once an external wall but is now covered in a room.) Before I mounted I simply removed a brick behind where the mount is and another brick about 3.5 feet down near the floor where the components are. This leaves two brick-sized holes (both completely hidden by the devices) through which to run cable.

I'm simply running the power cable through the holes and actually would prefer not to have any kind of terminals or connectors (everything is nice and open now). Since the PowerBridge cable is somehow approved to be behind the wall could I just use that and not the boxes (i.e. as an extension cord?) Better yet, since most of the power cables for the devices are standard is it possible to get a special version of a power cable that would meet code and could be put behind the wall?

-Aaron


Hey Aaron, sorry I missed your post from earlier.

First, running your power cord in the wall, even through brick, is still against CODE.
The Powerbridge is not actually a special cable for running in the wall, its a special in-wall electrical outlet receptacle power inlet kit to connect ROMEX directly to each other and running ROMEX inside the wall that is NEC CODE compliant.

There is NOT any special power cord you can buy from anyone that is designed to run in the wall, only ROMEX. The ROMEX is required to be connected (hardwired) to a receptacle outlet or inlet only, like what the Powerbridge kit includes.

If you want to be CODE compliant and insure you won't have any future possible problems, with a fire and or a insurance claim that won't be honored if you have any problems, then you will need to install ROMEX and outlet/inlets to meet CODE.

Good luck..

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #25 of 112 Old 08-06-2007, 05:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Reviving this important thread, to read regarding NOT putting your TV POWER CORD inside the wall. It's dangerous and against CODE. Please read this thread for all the great ideas everyone has made regarding this issue. Thanks..

Be safe, do it right, or don't do it..

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #26 of 112 Old 08-07-2007, 07:37 AM
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thanks HDTV, makes sense.


Something does not seem right with the PowerBridge pics. It would seem to me the power cable should be a male to male for connection into the Non-energized outlet.

In any event, I should be able to make something like this <$20. Two Outlets, 2 wall boxs, romex and a male to male extension cord. That way I can plug my tv into the same surge protection device.

Bob
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post #27 of 112 Old 08-07-2007, 09:34 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by bob_m10 View Post

thanks HDTV, makes sense.


Something does not seem right with the PowerBridge pics. It would seem to me the power cable should be a male to male for connection into the Non-energized outlet.

In any event, I should be able to make something like this <$20. Two Outlets, 2 wall boxs, romex and a male to male extension cord. That way I can plug my tv into the same surge protection device.

Bob

Bob, your idea of a MALE-MALE plug cord is so dangerous!! That's why you can't buy one and the UL would never allow any company to market one. That is absolutely NOT Code compliant and actually more dangerous than running the TV cord in the wall..!!!

Here's why::: If anyone were to unplug the cord going into the outlet, they would be fully exposed to live electricity.

The Powerbridge has a MALE-FEMALE cord, just like a appliance cord and with the recessed power inlet, there is no HOT connections if someone unplugs it.

$50 for a complete and SAFE electrical system is so worth it, why would you take a short cut and save $20-30 bucks? You spend that renting or buying movies in amonth probably.

If you install the items you're saying,,, GOOD luck!

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post #28 of 112 Old 08-07-2007, 11:17 AM
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>Here's why::: If anyone were to unplug the cord going into the outlet, they would be fully exposed to live electricity. <<br /> Very good point, was not thinking.

How does the Powerbridge work, the male end plugs into a live outlet, the female end plugs into the recessed power inlet? If the recessed power inlet is female as well, I don't see how they fit. It sure looks female from the pic on the web site. I must be missing something.

Thanks

Bob
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post #29 of 112 Old 08-07-2007, 11:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by bob_m10 View Post

>Here's why::: If anyone were to unplug the cord going into the outlet, they would be fully exposed to live electricity. <<br /> Very good point, was not thinking.

How does the Powerbridge work, the male end plugs into a live outlet, the female end plugs into the Non-energized outlet? If the Non-energized outlet is female as well, I don't see how they fit. I must be missing something.

Thanks

Bob

Your welcome Bob, glad I pointed the problem out... whew...

Ok, I installed my Powerbridge, so I can explain it..
Ok, the kit comes with 1 recessed receptacle/outlet that is FEMALE, like any other outlet, texcept that it is recessed so the TV cord-end plug doesn't stick out, messing up your TV flat against the wall. That recessed outlet installs in the wall behind your TV.

Now with ROMEX screwed to the back of that outlet, run the ROMEX to the MALE power INLET that you install where you have your surge protector or near an existing a/c outlet and screw the romex to the back of the INLET.
The INLET is a MALE recessed plug, not a female receptacle, so that's where you PLUG the extension cord FEMALE end into the power INLET.
Then you plug the MALE end of the extension cord into your surge protector or existing outlet.

That's how power gets safely to the TV outlet and if you have a surge protector, then even better!

Did that make any sense?

Here's the link to the Powerbridge instruction page and you can request a detailed set sent to you via email.

I hope I helped you better understand how it works, it's really pretty simple after you see the instructions. Let me know if I can help you any more.

And so it is.... Do it right, or go home...
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post #30 of 112 Old 08-07-2007, 11:55 AM
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The INLET sure looks Female from the pic, but I got it now.


Thanks Bob
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