Do you have you're plasma power cable in your wall? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 09-29-2008, 11:45 AM - Thread Starter
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I just want to get a good idea of how many of you Plasma owners actually have your TV's power cord running in your wall. (not the power-bar)

If so, have you had any issues?

Did you insulate the power cord or not?

I understand that it's not the greatest idea and that it does not conform to building code, but I do know that many people still do it. How many of you do?

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post #2 of 10 Old 09-29-2008, 11:57 AM
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My understanding is that you risk voiding your house insurance. So why gamble your house on it?
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post #3 of 10 Old 09-29-2008, 12:02 PM - Thread Starter
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I personaly don't have it run through the wall, just curious to see how many still do....

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post #4 of 10 Old 09-29-2008, 03:44 PM
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I have a closet on the other side of my living room wall. So I was thinking that I can make 2 holes. One behind the Plasma TV that goes into the closet and another one that brings the power cord back into the living room (close to a plug)

Question: Is this also against the building code?
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post #5 of 10 Old 09-29-2008, 04:00 PM
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Call your insurance company and let them tell you the truth.
Even it you do something stupid- they pay. If you hire someone and somthing goes wrong then the two insurance co. talk to each other.

** Please note we have been talking about-- EQ's Power Cord-- Not an extention cord.
But call you Insurance company...
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post #6 of 10 Old 09-29-2008, 10:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxbat121 View Post

My understanding is that you risk voiding your house insurance. So why gamble your house on it?


Exactly. Just not worth the risk.
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post #7 of 10 Old 09-30-2008, 06:33 AM
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I have, because frankly I didn't think twice about it. I actually read an article somewhere showing that very thing with no mention of building codes. I am looking for other options now, for no other reason than I found out it is probably against code.

I just don't see a good quality cord running through an empty uninsulated wall as being all that hazardous. I did see Monoprice has a solution that looks OK.

Does anybody know if this is a national building code thing or just certain states?
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post #8 of 10 Old 09-30-2008, 06:46 AM
 
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Its a National Electric code not a building code. Search the forum for, I think its called this, "power bridge". Thats an easy and proper way to do it.
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post #9 of 10 Old 09-30-2008, 06:56 AM
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FAQ

Why can't the TV power cord or an extension cord be run inside the wall?
Extension cords should never be used as a substitute for permanent wiring.
Cords need ventilation to prevent heat buildup, which could cause a fire.
If a fire would result, don't count on home/renters insurance to cover damage.
Never use extension cords on a continuous basis, they are only temporary solutions for A/C power distribution.
National Electric Code, local building and fire codes restrict the use of extension cords as permanent use.

The National Electric Code (NEC) states:
NEC ARTICLE 400 Flexible Cords and Cables General 400.1 Scope.
This article covers general requirements, applications, and construction specifications for flexible cords and flexible cables.
400.8 Uses Not Permitted.
Flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following:
(1)As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure
(2)Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors
(3)Where run through doorways, windows, or similar openings
(4)Where attached to building surfaces
Exception: Flexible cord and cable shall be permitted to be attached to building surfaces in accordance with the provisions of 368.8.
(5)Where concealed by walls, floors, or ceilings or located above suspended or dropped ceilings


If I just install a regular outlet behind my TV, isn't that the same as having the PowerBridge®?
Yes and No... Having a regular A/C outlet/receptacle installed behind your expensive wall mounted HDTV, will provide A/C power. However, one of the primary benefits of installing PowerBridge® In-Wall Power Solution, is the ability to connect an external Power Surge Protector | Power Conditioner | UPS device to provide a complete safe protected Power Solution to the HDTV, Home Theater equipment.
Unless you have a whole-house, main panel protection system installed, all outlets and switches in your home are un-protected from surge power and "dirty", noisy power which can reduce the life of electronics and power supplies.


How does PowerBridge® protect my HDTV and how is it installed?
PowerBridge® is part of a A/C Protection and Power Filtering Solution. The complete system allows for the wiring connection points, as a code compliant in-wall electrical power extension, of external Power Surge Protector/Conditioner/UPS devices.
PowerBridge® design allows A/C 125v power out from the protection device through the supplied power cord that is plugged into the PowerBridge® POWER-INLET. The back of the POWER-INLET is connected with in-wall building electrical type UL approved wire*, (Known as ROMEX®, well known brand of a NM [Nonmetallic] wire manufacturer) approved for in-wall, permanent building wiring. (Check with your Local Building Jurisdiction regarding any specific requirements for type of electrical building wire, such as BX, MC may be required for your area)
The building electrical wire, is run to the backside of the POWER-OUTLET installed where the HDTV or other home theater component you want to protect. The POWER-OUTLET receptacle is recessed, so the usually large plug end of the TV power cord will not interfere with the TV mounted flush on the wall.

*In-Wall building electrical type wire is not included with the PowerBridge System. Building electrical wire can be purchased at most hardware or home supply stores, by the foot or in boxes 12', 25', 50' and up.

Can I install this myself or do I need a professional?
PowerBridge® is easy and safe to install, as there is no direct wiring connection to the electrical panel or circuit or directly hardwired branch connection from the back of another existing outlet.
Installation instructions are included.

We recommended professional installation if you are not comfortable cutting holes and running wiring within the walls.

We also recommend checking with your local building jurisdiction regarding any requirements for running building electrical wire within a wall/ceiling.
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post #10 of 10 Old 11-17-2008, 01:59 PM
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Although it is a code violation, there is no greater chance of the wire heating up in the wall, anymore then it would heat up outside the wall. For the power cable on that tv to heat up to the point of fire, it would require an amperage that would have tripped the homes breaker, and additionally the surge protectors breaker long before the heat became an issue.

You should do it right, but lets not make things up.

If by freak chance the power cord did somehow catch fire (equivlent to the chance of you walking under a tree and a branch falling off it and killing you) it would have the same chance of burning the house down on the outside of the wall, wouldnt it?

The main thing here is that the cord simply is not to code, and could help spread fire, but lets be serious, if the wall is already burning down, what's the difference.

I'm not saying dont run a branched outlet, because that is the correct, safest way to do it. I am just saying you should'nt loose sleep over it. If you do, you need your head checked.

I do have the power cord run behind two interior walls, between two 16" spaced apart wooden studs. It makes a 4ft run vertically with the AV cables.

The code is there for a good reason. If some moron plans to start sending extension cords down the walls and up the attic to get additional power all over the place, then it really could be dangerous. But in this situation, let's be serious.

Even a few electricians I spoke to, gave me the "technically" answer.

The power bridge really provides NO additional protection besides easing peoples minds. The power cord is still in play, and the romex or in wall wiring is still dangling in the same area, with the ability to be piereced by a nail or whatever bother's these guys.

You can't really argue that the romex has the ground wire between the hot and neutral, because in a modern home electrical system, the neutral wire trips the breaker as well, so piercing a piece of romex, or a tv power cord has the same effect.

When push comes to shove, if you have the means to put a branched outlet where you need it, you should.

But i see people all over the forums spreading mis-information about how this stuff works.
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