Do I need a battery backup or surge protector? Any recommendations? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 07-09-2012, 08:58 AM - Thread Starter
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I am about to purchase a 50" Panasonic UT50 Plasma. Will I need a battery backup for this or will a surge protector work? Please suggest any that you think would be sufficient in supporting my tv. I will probably also plug my PS3 into it as well, but nothing further.
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post #2 of 13 Old 07-09-2012, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpbuen23 View Post

I am about to purchase a 50" Panasonic UT50 Plasma. Will I need a battery backup for this or will a surge protector work? Please suggest any that you think would be sufficient in supporting my tv. I will probably also plug my PS3 into it as well, but nothing further.


Our area is prone to numerous Brief Power Outages, particularly during Challenging Weather Conditions (high winds; heavy rain / snow; extended heat....).
Have therefore grown fond of UPS (battery back-up systems) with AVR circuits, and have roughly a half-dozen scattered around the house - mostly attached to computer stations, but also our main "HT" components.

If you are more concerned about Fluctuations in your power supply, as opposed to Power Outages, an AVR unit should suffice (power regulation without battery backup). Our eldest son has a nice unit from APC connected to his primary HT equipment & swears by it.

Note that UPS systems have a finite life span: generally 2 to 3 years. And that their batteries CAN run down to the point that they will fail to provide ANY run time, even though the "Replace Battery" signal has not been activated! frown.gif

Of course, you will NOT get a significant amount of run time for HT equipment from any consumer UPS unit - even with most computer stations you are simply talking about enough time to "Gracefully Shut Down."

However, you may find that a good UPS will keep things running for the type of "mini-outages" that we often experience - sometimes literally Just Long Enough to reset the electronic clocks!

For a possible bargain, check out the new units CostCo has picked up from CyberPower: our local store is selling these for around $90, and their Published specs are better than the TrippLite units they formerly carried.
Also offer a 3-year warranty, which seems encouraging.

Otherwise, would look at APC - and you should be able to find a discussions about their products (and competitors) by searching about....
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post #3 of 13 Old 07-10-2012, 12:11 PM
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I don't think there is any advantage to having battery backup on a plasma (unlike a projector for instance), except for the obvious luxury of uninterrupted usage. Personally, I won't use a UPS beause it's just another thing that will fail on you eventually (and I have relatively stable power). Of course, there are plenty of unseen power "gremlins" that can and do erode many types of electronics (based on my research), shortening their life span. High power appliances, seasonal brownouts and blackouts are commonly cited sources, and for these it's a not a bad idea to employ some kind of POU surge suppression. Of course, a whole-house system should also be implemented as a first line of defense (but remember, none of this provides any guarantee of lightning protection).

For my significant investment in AV equipment, I wanted surge supression that will not degrade over time (scratch most common consumer grade units) and that will not choke my system when it demands more power (not a concern in your application). That's why I went with series mode units (mine are from Torus, specially designed to be non-current limiting). The most current and claimed "best" technology comes from the inventor, Zero Surge. But there are also prefectly good units available from Surgex and Brickwall (and you can buy used with confidence from places like eBay, since these things never wear out!).
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post #4 of 13 Old 07-11-2012, 08:21 AM
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UPS will do nothing for you, since you really won't have any significant up time in case of a power failure. Those "power strip" solutions are useless and deteriorate over time. I use line conditioners on all my equipment (around $44) to protect against brownouts, spikes, and surges.

Tony
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post #5 of 13 Old 07-11-2012, 08:38 AM
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Howdy,
the posters above have no clue what you are asking. eek.gif

Yes, a UPS is a good choice. Just make sure its not the lowest style model. You will want a UPS which has AVR. Yes, the Costco ups unit will work nicely, and the pricing is good.

The problem is the power never goes off cleanly. The power surges, browns, goes off for 2 seconds and then is on, then off and so forth. The UPS attached was never meant to sit and watch TV. It meant to do its job, and protect the equipment from these power glitches. cool.gif

Yes, remember a UPS battery needs to be replaced. It is a battery. So, with a limited lifespan of about 3-4 years.

~~Later Mike
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post #6 of 13 Old 07-11-2012, 09:46 AM
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Well well well, we have an expert! mflagg, please point me to some documented cases of a power failure or brownout cusing harm to a plasma TV. rolleyes.gif

Now, if you're in another country where the grid is unstable, they make more sense, but I doubt they provide much protection as you claim. If you have a projector, then damage can be done during a blackout as the cooling fans required for proper shutdown will not operate.
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post #7 of 13 Old 07-11-2012, 09:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adone36 View Post

UPS will do nothing for you, since you really won't have any significant up time in case of a power failure. Those "power strip" solutions are useless and deteriorate over time. I use line conditioners on all my equipment (around $44) to protect against brownouts, spikes, and surges.

I know what you're saying, but for those very brief outages that are common in some areas, a higher end UPS will allow you to continue watching TV. APC has units popular with the AV crowd:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=465418&Q=&is=REG&A=details
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post #8 of 13 Old 07-12-2012, 03:03 PM
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I don't know about plasmas being affected, but I have lost a 200w power amp and a satellite receiver.

I picked up a Monster unit from a shop that was going out of business for half-price. Wouldn't pay that much otherwise. It is now backing up my satellite DVR as well as protecting some other equipment. I have a Tripp 1500VA unit that I'm going to use for the TV, AVR and associated network equipment. Its only problem is the internal fan is loud as heck. I've replaced it twice to find something quieter without much success.
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post #9 of 13 Old 07-13-2012, 03:29 AM
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I use the newer cyberpower 1500VA for my plasma/router/modem/ps3/led lights on the battery side and the receiver and chargers on the other side. Mine also has 2 USB ports for charging phones/communicating with the unit. Now that being said, those of you who run ANYTHING with a hard drive (PS3, Xbox, HTPC) should have a power conditioner in line somewhere. Dirty power is a known culprit to failed HDDs.

That being said, I did not buy the unit to power my tv, but rather to let me power it down, protect the ps3 and have uninterrupted internet. The led lights(behind the tv)/router/modem use almost no power and per the readings should last about 2 hours. This is enough time for me to find flashlights and give me another avenue to the internet in case cell towers go down etc. With the tv and ps3 on i will get about 18 minutes of run time.

Another advantage is some have logging software and settings that can be set up etc. Its like having a beefed up kill-a-watt. You will be amazed how much a plasma will use energy wise on a bright screen vs a dim one (I had to upgrade from an 850 when i got my old plasma cause the reciver, ps3 and tv will max out the UPS) wink.gif

Hope this information helps
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post #10 of 13 Old 07-13-2012, 07:10 AM
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Guess I could have been clearer - AFAIK, there is no potential for damage by suddenly cutting power from a plasma TV, which I believe was the concern of the OP. Surges can sometimes occur during power failures, so good protection is warranted. However, I am not aware of any additional protection offered by UPS-type systems in this case.
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post #11 of 13 Old 07-13-2012, 02:53 PM
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post #12 of 13 Old 07-16-2012, 08:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mflagg View Post

Howdy,
the posters above have no clue what you are asking. eek.gif
Yes, a UPS is a good choice. Just make sure its not the lowest style model. You will want a UPS which has AVR. Yes, the Costco ups unit will work nicely, and the pricing is good.
The problem is the power never goes off cleanly. The power surges, browns, goes off for 2 seconds and then is on, then off and so forth. The UPS attached was never meant to sit and watch TV. It meant to do its job, and protect the equipment from these power glitches. cool.gif
Yes, remember a UPS battery needs to be replaced. It is a battery. So, with a limited lifespan of about 3-4 years.

A line conditioner maintains voltage and current. When the "power goes off" UNCLEANLY, it's the same thing as hitting the power switch on the TV.
Since you can only watch a few minutes with a UPS (or have to spend $$$$ for a v high capacity UPS) spending $150-1000 for a UPS is silly when Line conditioners are $45.

Tony
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post #13 of 13 Old 06-08-2013, 04:18 PM
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All surge protectors connected to a socket will still let threw voltage up to 330 volts or even more depending on the specifications of the surge power bar. Anything connected to a surge protector still uses 250%+ of the power requirement when there`s power surges.

Appliances and electronics not connected to a surge protector have no protection against any surges.

New technology high quality whole house surge suppressors can now clamp voltage at 130 volts. Improving life expectancy by up to 32% of all electronics including appliances, electronics with microprocessors and anything with a motor.

Research and detailed information about power surges, surge protectors and lightning strikes can be found on this page:

http://armur.webs.com/surge-suppression

According to industry standards, power line surges inside a building can be up to 6,000 volts, and 3,000 amperes, and deliver up to 90 joules of energy. Including surges from external sources.

Any surge protector offering protection over those specifications is extra for nothing, a gimmick.

Typically destructive surges are hundreds of thousands of joules. Lightning and other high-energy transient voltage surges can only be suppressed with a whole house surge protector.

Surge protectors can offer no protection against indirect or direct lightning and other high-energy transient voltage surges.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surge_protector
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