My manual doesn't say anything about "break-in", important? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 12:39 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
tealboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I saw someone reference a comment about "break-in" of new plasmas, which i was unfamilar with. My owners manual does not say anything about the need to break in the tv. When i looked on this site, i saw a thread going back to 2004 and an updated version in 2007 with pages and pages of threads so I'm hoping to get a simple answer to this question with this post...Is it really necessary for me to go through any special break in process and what are the consequences if i simply start watching movies w/o the special break in? I'm wondering if these guidelines are for older plasmas and less applicable today
tealboy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 01:15 PM
mnc
AVS Special Member
 
mnc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Dallas, GA
Posts: 1,617
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked: 52
Break in is really just the fact that the panel will stabilize during the first couple hundred hours or so. The picture will get better during this time. It can be more susceptible to uneven phosphor wear during this time so the only thing to worry about is watching a lot of 4:3 or letterbox images. Stick with full screen and you will be fine. Enjoy!

Indecision may or may not be my problem.
mnc is online now  
post #3 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 01:23 PM
Advanced Member
 
dmaul1114's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Only reasons to run break in slides are:

1. Age the panel evenly so it stabilizes and you can get it calibrated sooner. If you're not doing a professional calibration, this isn't a huge deal. Just wait a month or two before fiddling too much with adjusting yourself with a disc like Disney WoW (or be do it again after a couple months).

2. To blow through the first 100+ hours faster as the sets more prone to IR during that time. After 100 hours the set isn't more IR resistant than if you just used it normally for 100 hours and avoided static logos and black bars. But running slides while asleep and away from home just gets you through that period faster so you can get to using the TV normally and not worry so much about static logos, black bars etc. sooner.
dmaul1114 is offline  
post #4 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 01:31 PM
Senior Member
 
xwilliam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Boston, MA - USA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmaul1114 View Post

Only reasons to run break in slides are:

1. Age the panel evenly so it stabilizes and you can get it calibrated sooner. If you're not doing a professional calibration, this isn't a huge deal. Just wait a month or two before fiddling too much with adjusting yourself with a disc like Disney WoW (or be do it again after a couple months).

2. To blow through the first 100+ hours faster as the sets more prone to IR during that time. After 100 hours the set isn't more IR resistant than if you just used it normally for 100 hours and avoided static logos and black bars. But running slides while asleep and away from home just gets you through that period faster so you can get to using the TV normally and not worry so much about static logos, black bars etc. sooner.
And 3) If you want to use D-Nice's settings on a Panny 2012 plasma, then using his slides for exactly 100 hours will get some very good results with his custom settings (apparently--I don't yet speak from experience, but I'm running the slides now.) Confused? I was too. Register at this site and read the first few pages of this thread:
http://www.**************.com/showthread.php?t=13397
I'm running the slides more to blow through the first 100 hours rather than for D-Nice settings. My 100 hours will be about 85% slides and 15% regular viewing so D-Nice settings will not be exact, but I'll see what they do anyway. What plasma did you buy?
xwilliam is offline  
post #5 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 03:33 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
rogo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Sequoia, CA
Posts: 30,061
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked: 382
Quote:
My manual doesn't say anything about "break-in", important?

Nope.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
rogo is offline  
post #6 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 03:52 PM
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Irrelevent these days. More of a waste of time, or people use the slides to find out if the set is faulty or not.
gregzoll is offline  
post #7 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 04:02 PM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1002
^Time, and energy, though if you're in a rush to get your panel calibrator/calibration ready, I can see the appeal. I can also say that I use my Kuro almost exclusively to watch cinema and, as a result, the top and bottom edges are noticeably less "worn" than the center (where the black levels are actually lower). I used break-in slides for the first 100 hours, so obviously a break-in is not going to save a panel from this type of "abuse."

The only consumer product that is really recommended to be broken in anymore (that I can think of) is the automobile, and even then it a pretty tame procedure (don't gun the engine, no sudden stopping, and avoid cruising at the same speed for extended periods, which would only be a concern if the only areas you drive are slopeless and with no inclination or declination wink.gif).
vinnie97 is offline  
post #8 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 06:24 PM
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Actually Vinnie, vehicles are designed to be more efficient to run at a stable speed, than decelerating & accelerating, which puts more wear and tear on the mechanical components. As for electronics, yes there are some that should be broken in over a period of time, but stuff like tv sets, are designed at a certain spec, so that consumers for the majority do not have to worry about this stuff.

Yes, if you are really particular and notice differences in tones, etc., then I am all for having a second party look at it to make sure the factory did their job in making sure it meets the proper criteria, otherwise, it becomes a null point for the most that are purchasing, just to have a new set that replaces the old.

Now of course the one thing that torches my rear, is going someplace and watching something on a set, with the brightness so cranked up, along with Contrast, that it makes you want to go home and watch. Even worst are places like bars, that show SD programming, or even HD stuff on uncalibrated projectors, that just speak volumes of the ownership. Only place I have found in our town that the tv's & projectors are even close to being properly setup is our church, a local Methodist church in our town, and believe or not, the local B-dub's.
gregzoll is offline  
post #9 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 06:39 PM
AVS Special Member
 
JSpectre88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
I don't plan on breaking-in my TV using slides or anything like that, but how important is using a lower contrast? Is it strongly recommended to use a lower contrast to avoid IR or burn-in, or is it more of a precaution than anything else? I understand the TV is more susceptible to burn-in within the first 100-200 hours or so than at any other point, so I don't want to risk it. I took back my first plasma after 2-weeks, but I didn't exactly enjoy keeping the contrast at 50% for the first 100 hours or so. Do I need to keep the set fairly dim or can I turn it up a good amount, as long as I avoid it being overly bright?
JSpectre88 is offline  
post #10 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 06:41 PM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1002
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post

Actually Vinnie, vehicles are designed to be more efficient to run at a stable speed, than decelerating & accelerating, which puts more wear and tear on the mechanical components. As for electronics, yes there are some that should be broken in over a period of time, but stuff like tv sets, are designed at a certain spec, so that consumers for the majority do not have to worry about this stuff.

Yes, if you are really particular and notice differences in tones, etc., then I am all for having a second party look at it to make sure the factory did their job in making sure it meets the proper criteria, otherwise, it becomes a null point for the most that are purchasing, just to have a new set that replaces the old.

Now of course the one thing that torches my rear, is going someplace and watching something on a set, with the brightness so cranked up, along with Contrast, that it makes you want to go home and watch. Even worst are places like bars, that show SD programming, or even HD stuff on uncalibrated projectors, that just speak volumes of the ownership. Only place I have found in our town that the tv's & projectors are even close to being properly setup is our church, a local Methodist church in our town, and believe or not, the local B-dub's.
Right, that goes without saying about better gas mileage when driving conservatively. I was only referring to the break-in period for modern vehicles in the first 1000 miles where sudden acceleration/deceleration is specifically discouraged. As far as electronics, are you referring to audio items? In the analog realm, I am sure it is more frequently recommended.
vinnie97 is offline  
post #11 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 07:16 PM
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 32
Even now, car manufacturers do not really state about the break-in period, because of the fact, that they know that modern society just wants to hop in and drive. Why do you think that they have such stringent requirements regarding warranties, and and knowing that the tolerances are better these days, than in years gone pass. Same goes for electronics, that certain items do not need a break-in period.

If that was the case, the manufacturer would have it programmed into the device, to limit use for a X period of time, before the consumer can just leave it be and go.
gregzoll is offline  
post #12 of 29 Old 01-28-2013, 07:35 PM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1002
Well, I am aware of that to be the case for electronics (I just couldn't think of any electronic components aside from Plasmas where break-in is ever recommended).

Concerning vehicles, I can't speak for any other manufacturers beyond Toyota, but in the manual for my 2012 Toyota, it does state the following:
Quote:
Breaking in your new Toyota

To extend the life of the vehicle, observing the following precautions is recommended:

●For the first 200 miles (300 km):
Avoid sudden stops.

●For the first 1000 miles (1600 km):
• Do not drive at extremely high speeds.
• Avoid sudden acceleration.
• Do not drive at a constant speed for extended periods.

As to how long it will extend the vehicle's life (or if it will ultimately make any difference whatsoever), that's anybody's guess, but they must have had some kind of data supporting this recommendation.
vinnie97 is offline  
post #13 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 03:36 AM
AVS Special Member
 
s2mikey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate, NY
Posts: 2,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post

Even now, car manufacturers do not really state about the break-in period, because of the fact, that they know that modern society just wants to hop in and drive. Why do you think that they have such stringent requirements regarding warranties, and and knowing that the tolerances are better these days, than in years gone pass. Same goes for electronics, that certain items do not need a break-in period.

If that was the case, the manufacturer would have it programmed into the device, to limit use for a X period of time, before the consumer can just leave it be and go.

I agree. The car thing was a good example. Although, my 2012 Sentra did mention something in the manual about changing speeds frequently when possible for the 1,000 miles. Either way, just watch the TV and enjoy it.
s2mikey is offline  
post #14 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 04:04 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Browninggold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Depends on who's looking for me
Posts: 2,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 37
I didn't break in my Plasma 8-9 year old set. Finally died. Never had any burn in or anything. Used the XBox 360 regularly on the set. IMO a waste of time and a waste of hours on the set. Truth be known probably does more harm than good.

"We can complain because rose bushes have thorns or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses". - Abraham Lincoln
Browninggold is offline  
post #15 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 09:44 AM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1002
^Proof that it does any measurable harm or are you basing that on the fact that it ages the panel prematurely? It's a good stress tester in any case. Most panels that fail do so within shortly after being purchased, so this is also a good way to test the panel out of the box.
vinnie97 is offline  
post #16 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 09:51 AM
Advanced Member
 
dmaul1114's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Yeah, it does no harm. I mean yeah, it's 100 hours of non-active watching on the TV. But with half life brightness now estimated at 100,000 hours who cares?

As you note, even if it doesn't do a lot of direct good it is a good stress test to identify lemons early on. And it's a good way to blow past the first 100 hours or so when the the picture hasn't settled in yet, is more prone to IR etc. so that one has more time to make sure they like it while in the return period (especially if they buy somewhere with only a 14 day return period).
dmaul1114 is offline  
post #17 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 11:51 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
rogo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Sequoia, CA
Posts: 30,061
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked: 382
I don't see how it can do any harm.

But I also don't see how it can do much good.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
rogo is offline  
post #18 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 12:14 PM
Advanced Member
 
dmaul1114's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Really the only good is if one wants to apply D-Nices settings as they're based on the panel being evenly aged for 100 hours with the slides. Regular watching won't age each pixel evenly as it's not solid colors for equal amounts of time. But 99% of people are never going to notice any difference from just using those settings (or their own from a disc) from the get go.

Otherwise the only good is to blow through the first 100 hours when IR is more problematic and the picture less stable quickly so you can get it adjusted and test it out with normal usage and see if it's the right set for you before the return period is up.

But honestly, even that I don't think is needed. If you're not watching things with static images for long periods and regularly mixing types of content, then IR will never be an issue and plasma PQ is top notch. If you're like me and have lots of static images for hours on end from games and ESPN etc., then best to just ignore the plasma enthusiasts and go for LED/LCD as IR is still more problematic for those types of uses than some people let on. Permanent burn in largely a thing of the past, but stubborn and distracting IR still occurs. Especially if you watch a lot of brighter content (basketball with the light courts, hockey with the ice) where IR from game HUDs etc. really stand out.

Point being, if plasma is really right for your uses, then I don't think the break in period is necessary. If it's not, then it isn't going to help much as it doesn't make it more resistant to IR vs. just using it cautiously for 100 hours or so.
dmaul1114 is offline  
post #19 of 29 Old 01-30-2013, 01:14 PM
Senior Member
 
Trebor Pyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Austin,TX
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
1) Stress test the unit / check for any screen defects

2) Reduce the chance of early on IR (maybe)

3) The panel looks so much better after 100, 200, 300 hrs

4) I had to wait untill the weekend to hang it (got it on a Tuesday) so it was just sitting there in the foyer.
Trebor Pyn is offline  
post #20 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 12:35 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
rogo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Sequoia, CA
Posts: 30,061
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked: 382
Regular watching is all most people ever do. At some point, whatever "early effect" the TV has is gone and the TV can be calibrated "safely".

The idea behind the slides is that you can accelerate the point of passing the "early effect" date. But the reality is some arbitrary number of hours of regular watching is every single bit as valid a method of getting past it (if such a thing even exists).

You can ask your calibrator what the magic number of hours is, but the idea that the slides are some order of magnitude above regular viewing is wrong. They are perhaps a multiple of regular viewing hours.

I still don't see what the point is unless, as said above, you are applying settings from someone who expects a panel that has passed the "early effect" stage. And the value of those settings is often limited anyway by panel-to-panel variation.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
rogo is offline  
post #21 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 08:54 AM
Member
 
SHOWM3URBO0BYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
does image retention get less and less as the plasma ages, i played forza horizon for about an hour and a half and i faintly got the time tickers on the top right but went away within 1-2 minutes on fullscreen tv. i guess im being to picky, i should be at 100 hours tomorrow morning and just wanted to know if the panal will be able to deal with IR better as it ages.
SHOWM3URBO0BYZ is offline  
post #22 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 10:09 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
rogo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Sequoia, CA
Posts: 30,061
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked: 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHOWM3URBO0BYZ View Post

does image retention get less and less as the plasma ages, i played forza horizon for about an hour and a half and i faintly got the time tickers on the top right but went away within 1-2 minutes on fullscreen tv. i guess im being to picky, i should be at 100 hours tomorrow morning and just wanted to know if the panal will be able to deal with IR better as it ages.

It might get better.

But I'm confused why 1-2 minutes of "faint" time tickers that were then gone even constitutes a problem.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
rogo is offline  
post #23 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 01:20 PM
Advanced Member
 
dmaul1114's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

It might get better.

But I'm confused why 1-2 minutes of "faint" time tickers that were then gone even constitutes a problem.

I don't think he thought it was a problem.

Most just worry if you get mild IR from short uses like that, what happens if you play for 8 hours straight? Or play for several hours a night almost every night?

Of course the answer to that is one really shouldn't buy a plasma if they use the TV that way. But many may make a bad choice by saying IR isn't an issue at all. When it still very much is if you have any kind of uses that involve static images for long periods of time repeatedly. It's just that unless you're a gamer, or someone who leaves ESPN on all day every day or whatever it doesn't apply--and most people are using their sets primarily for Blu-rays and watching a variety of channels so they mix content and never have to worry.

But for those who don't, it is an issue and some people on sites like this could be a little more forth coming about steering such people to LCD/LED rather than just being fanboys for plasmas.
dmaul1114 is offline  
post #24 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 02:11 PM
AVS Special Member
 
JSpectre88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmaul1114 View Post

I don't think he thought it was a problem.

Most just worry if you get mild IR from short uses like that, what happens if you play for 8 hours straight? Or play for several hours a night almost every night?

Of course the answer to that is one really shouldn't buy a plasma if they use the TV that way. But many may make a bad choice by saying IR isn't an issue at all. When it still very much is if you have any kind of uses that involve static images for long periods of time repeatedly. It's just that unless you're a gamer, or someone who leaves ESPN on all day every day or whatever it doesn't apply--and most people are using their sets primarily for Blu-rays and watching a variety of channels so they mix content and never have to worry.

But for those who don't, it is an issue and some people on sites like this could be a little more forth coming about steering such people to LCD/LED rather than just being fanboys for plasmas.

I would have to agree. If I didn't play the majority of my games now on the PC, I would have a hard time choosing plasma. I can only imagine what my old BF/CoD marathons would do to that poor thing. I only really use the X360 for more casual games or streaming and the like now, so I think I will be fine in that regard. Granted, anything with static elements can be a detriment, I just don't use it for anywhere near as long as I have in the past.
JSpectre88 is offline  
post #25 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 02:32 PM
AVS Special Member
 
JSpectre88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
I suppose you brought up another question I had regarding burn-in. Is there a large distinction between repeated instances of IR and burn-in?. For instance, can I still get burn-in if I frequently were to get IR from the same source? Let's use a HUD on a video game for example. Say I were to play the same game for 2-4 hours a night, and it produces faint IR. Now this IR is gone by the next day through minimal TV usage, but it comes back after the next game session. If this process gets repeated would the IR become more severe, would prolonged IR exposure inevitably lead to burn-in? I just don't know what really causes burn-in, is it simply leaving a static image on for days on end with no reprieve, or can repeated instances of IR also cause it?
JSpectre88 is offline  
post #26 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 06:02 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
rogo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Sequoia, CA
Posts: 30,061
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked: 382
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmaul1114 View Post

I don't think he thought it was a problem.

Most just worry if you get mild IR from short uses like that, what happens if you play for 8 hours straight? Or play for several hours a night almost every night?

Of course the answer to that is one really shouldn't buy a plasma if they use the TV that way. But many may make a bad choice by saying IR isn't an issue at all. When it still very much is if you have any kind of uses that involve static images for long periods of time repeatedly. It's just that unless you're a gamer, or someone who leaves ESPN on all day every day or whatever it doesn't apply--and most people are using their sets primarily for Blu-rays and watching a variety of channels so they mix content and never have to worry.

But for those who don't, it is an issue and some people on sites like this could be a little more forth coming about steering such people to LCD/LED rather than just being fanboys for plasmas.

I was going to agree with you, but then I think you might have called me a fanboy, which I take offense at in this case.

Anyway, I always steer hardcore gamers to LCDs and away from plasmas the same way I'd steer anyone who wanted to regularly plug in a computer to an LCD. (Note, I bet I could game every day on my plasma without issue. But I'd never game for 6-8 hours at a time and wouldn't want to watch the HUD from a game even for 30-45 minutes afterward, if such a thing was temporarily "retained.")
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSpectre88 View Post

I would have to agree. If I didn't play the majority of my games now on the PC, I would have a hard time choosing plasma. I can only imagine what my old BF/CoD marathons would do to that poor thing. I only really use the X360 for more casual games or streaming and the like now, so I think I will be fine in that regard. Granted, anything with static elements can be a detriment, I just don't use it for anywhere near as long as I have in the past.

So I imagine my old WoW days on the plasma and I doubt I'd be happy if I had anything like the image after effects some report here. On my current plasma, however, I do use the consoles pretty often and never have a single issue of retention. Of course, nothing is up on screen for hours.

That said, ESPN is up on the screen for hours -- also without issue.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSpectre88 View Post

I suppose you brought up another question I had regarding burn-in. Is there a large distinction between repeated instances of IR and burn-in?. For instance, can I still get burn-in if I frequently were to get IR from the same source? Let's use a HUD on a video game for example. Say I were to play the same game for 2-4 hours a night, and it produces faint IR. Now this IR is gone by the next day through minimal TV usage, but it comes back after the next game session. If this process gets repeated would the IR become more severe, would prolonged IR exposure inevitably lead to burn-in? I just don't know what really causes burn-in, is it simply leaving a static image on for days on end with no reprieve, or can repeated instances of IR also cause it?

So, no, it won't lead to burn in actually. You'd need thousands and thousands of hours of gaming to do that.

But if you always played long gaming sessions, you might find that it always left some residual image for a while. And that might drive you a bit insane, especially if there wasn't enough regular viewing in between to get rid of it.

I would personally not buy a plasma if I was gaming like that. But I wouldn't hesitate to buy a plasma and game 10-15 hours per week. I'd just be playing different games in that hypothetical scenario, not the same version of Call of Duty every day. Even different games are the equivalent of watching regular TV and would "erase" any retention over time.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
rogo is offline  
post #27 of 29 Old 01-31-2013, 09:10 PM
AVS Special Member
 
JSpectre88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 54
That's pretty much how I expected it should work, thanks for confirming it.
JSpectre88 is offline  
post #28 of 29 Old 02-01-2013, 05:00 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Browninggold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Depends on who's looking for me
Posts: 2,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinnie97 View Post

^Proof that it does any measurable harm or are you basing that on the fact that it ages the panel prematurely? It's a good stress tester in any case. Most panels that fail do so within shortly after being purchased, so this is also a good way to test the panel out of the box.

Basing on me owning a Plasma. I never had any burn in. Played enough Xbox over the yrs. hours at a time etc...never had burn in or anything. I say why waste a 100 hours when you could be using the set. My plasma I purchased 8-9 years ago so I would imagine they have improved in quality over the yrs. IMO

"We can complain because rose bushes have thorns or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses". - Abraham Lincoln
Browninggold is offline  
post #29 of 29 Old 02-01-2013, 09:34 AM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1002
Personal anecdotes aside, I'm not referring specifically to burn-in; just any defects (some which might even be show-stopping). If anything, quality has dropped since 2008 and the implosion of the global economy. All I'm suggesting is there's no harm in stress-testing the TV right out of the box. It will serve to separate the chaff from the wheat, so to speak.
vinnie97 is offline  
Reply Plasma Flat Panel Displays

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off