COAXIAL SURGE PROTECTION - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 11-30-2013, 10:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Hey, I'm planning to buy a Panasonic Plasma for my first TV, very soon. I want to do everything I can do protect it and make it last. I've already bought a Tripp Lite surge protector (SM's too expensive ATM) http://www.tripplite.com/en/products/model.cfm?txtSeriesID=829&txtModelID=4137 . This one comes with coax jacks. I've been been reading for hours trying to find out about coaxial surge protection. There is no doubt a surge can travel though the coax lines. I know a surge protector with built in coax jacks can sometimes degrade the signal. There is three ways that I know of that you can protect the coaxial lines from surges. 1. grounding at the box outside, by your cable company. 2. using the built in coax on surge protectors. 3. using an in-line surge protector; box - in-line protector - TV. Protection at the box outside isn't an option. I need to know if it's better using an in-line coax surge protector OR using the built in coax jacks on a surge protector. Which one will actually work against surges better?? 

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post #2 of 24 Old 11-30-2013, 11:42 PM
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Surges are not always the same, so it's difficult to answer your question.

If you're particularly concerned, I would use both the gas discharge and MOV-based surge protectors. You might want to check for proper grounding, as well. You can buy an outlet tester for $8 at Home Depot that would help diagnose any wiring faults.
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post #3 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 08:01 AM - Thread Starter
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Anyone else care to tell me what is better between the two for coax? An in-line coax surge protector or the built in coax jacks on a surge protector??

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post #4 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 08:10 AM
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Did you buy an extended warranty? Mine covers anything from a Lightning strike to any kind of surge problem.

Just a thought.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #5 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 08:31 AM
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Not sure what specs indicate what but I'd be prepared to spend a lot on one if you want it to have decent image quality. Check individual reviews, and maybe even consider an inline one if you're concerned.
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post #6 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 08:39 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

Did you buy an extended warranty? Mine covers anything from a Lightning strike to any kind of surge problem.

Just a thought.

 

 

Obviously. But thats not the point. You dont even understand this topic. It's called PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT PAST WARRANTY.

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post #7 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 03:18 PM
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I don't know where you live but we've never had a tv or any electronics blow out even when we've blown fuses and I'm fifty years old. If I were you I'd move somewhere else.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #8 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 03:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

I don't know where you live but we've never had a tv or any electronics blow out even when we've blown fuses and I'm fifty years old. If I were you I'd move somewhere else.

 

I dont care. I just dont. Irrelevant to my post. 

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post #9 of 24 Old 12-01-2013, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr View Post

Hey, I'm planning to buy a Panasonic Plasma for my first TV, very soon. I want to do everything I can do protect it and make it last. I've already bought a Tripp Lite surge protector (SM's too expensive ATM) http://www.tripplite.com/en/products/model.cfm?txtSeriesID=829&txtModelID=4137 . This one comes with coax jacks. I've been been reading for hours trying to find out about coaxial surge protection. There is no doubt a surge can travel though the coax lines. I know a surge protector with built in coax jacks can sometimes degrade the signal. There is three ways that I know of that you can protect the coaxial lines from surges. 1. grounding at the box outside, by your cable company. 2. using the built in coax on surge protectors. 3. using an in-line surge protector; box - in-line protector - TV. Protection at the box outside isn't an option. I need to know if it's better using an in-line coax surge protector OR using the built in coax jacks on a surge protector. Which one will actually work against surges better?? 
Well at the risk of inciting another of your cleverly worded vitriolic responses dare I ask why it's not an option to properly bond the cable out at the box? That is truly the best place to apply protection, as most damaging currents travel on the shield and are easily shunted to ground by the ground block. If you aren't using an antenna then there is really extremely little likelihood of a surge current on the center conductor. With the imminent disappearance of Analog and Clear QAM CATV odds are you won't be connecting the coax directly to the TV anyway.

PS: If you really must know, neither of your mentioned options is good but connecting to the one in your outlet strip would at least ensure that all 'grounds' are at the same potential (assuming the F-61 connectors are connected to the ground lead of the power strip).


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post #10 of 24 Old 12-02-2013, 08:33 AM
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Let me break it down for you like this. I just bought a new plasma tv. I bought a three year warranty, which I can renew in three years. If something happens to it they fix it or give me a newer model. This can go on for twenty years or longer. I will keep getting new tv's. I don't have to worry about the coaxial connection, that's the cable companies problem. If your system is grounded properly your ok. If you are connecting the cables yourself it doesn't matter to the insurance policy, they Still pay up. Buy the warranty or start a post like this and hope for the best. Make any sense now? I hope so.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #11 of 24 Old 12-02-2013, 01:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Well at the risk of inciting another of your cleverly worded vitriolic responses dare I ask why it's not an option to properly bond the cable out at the box? That is truly the best place to apply protection, as most damaging currents travel on the shield and are easily shunted to ground by the ground block. If you aren't using an antenna then there is really extremely little likelihood of a surge current on the center conductor. With the imminent disappearance of Analog and Clear QAM CATV odds are you won't be connecting the coax directly to the TV anyway.

PS: If you really must know, neither of your mentioned options is good but connecting to the one in your outlet strip would at least ensure that all 'grounds' are at the same potential (assuming the F-61 connectors are connected to the ground lead of the power strip).

 

I cant protect at the box because I live in an apartment. Btw, I am connecting coax directly to the TV, from the wall. So you're saying that it would be better running my coax through an MOV surge protector (the one that I linked), than to run it through an in-line protector. My understanding is that MOV's work by shunting the surge to the ground in the protector, then the surge goes to the ground in the outlet?

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post #12 of 24 Old 12-02-2013, 01:26 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

Let me break it down for you like this. I just bought a new plasma tv. I bought a three year warranty, which I can renew in three years. If something happens to it they fix it or give me a newer model. This can go on for twenty years or longer. I will keep getting new tv's. I don't have to worry about the coaxial connection, that's the cable companies problem. If your system is grounded properly your ok. If you are connecting the cables yourself it doesn't matter to the insurance policy, they Still pay up. Buy the warranty or start a post like this and hope for the best. Make any sense now? I hope so.

 

 

I dont believe you can renew your warranty every three years which is about $200-$300, and repeat the process for 20 years. If that was the case, everyone would be taking advantage of that than buy a new $1200 tv. 

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post #13 of 24 Old 12-02-2013, 07:43 PM
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It doesn't cost $200, it's costs under $60 and yes it's renewable. Beware of BB's high priced warranty plans, or any other ripoff price. Yes people do what I did all the time, that's how I found out. It's a gamble I know but I keep winning.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #14 of 24 Old 12-03-2013, 03:18 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

It doesn't cost $200, it's costs under $60 and yes it's renewable. Beware of BB's high priced warranty plans, or any other ripoff price. Yes people do what I did all the time, that's how I found out. It's a gamble I know but I keep winning.

 

I live in Canada buddy. What is BB? I'm guessing its a retail store. Where I'm from, the average extended warranty is $200 in stores.

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post #15 of 24 Old 12-03-2013, 06:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

It doesn't cost $200, it's costs under $60 and yes it's renewable. Beware of BB's high priced warranty plans, or any other ripoff price. Yes people do what I did all the time, that's how I found out. It's a gamble I know but I keep winning.

Who is the provider of your $60 renewable warranty? Mack? Square Trade? CPS?

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post #16 of 24 Old 12-03-2013, 11:33 AM
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It's a long drive from California. If you're willing to make the trip I'll tell you.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #17 of 24 Old 12-03-2013, 01:48 PM
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gee, how very helpful....

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post #18 of 24 Old 12-03-2013, 02:54 PM
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Who is the provider of your $60 renewable warranty? Mack? Square Trade? CPS?

I, too, would like to know

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post #19 of 24 Old 12-04-2013, 06:14 PM
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Are you willing to buy online and have a $$$-$$$$ Tv shipping across the country? I wouldn't. What are you going to do when it needs repairs?, Ship it back?, I wouldn't. The repair guys are local. Do some research and you'll find a local store where you live that will take care of you guys. It's kind of a moot point to name the place if you aren't willing to have your new Tv's shipped and handled by guys who are jealous of you and might accidentally drop it.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #20 of 24 Old 12-05-2013, 07:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

I don't know where you live but we've never had a tv or any electronics blow out even when we've blown fuses and I'm fifty years old. If I were you I'd move somewhere else.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

Let me break it down for you like this. I just bought a new plasma tv. I bought a three year warranty, which I can renew in three years. If something happens to it they fix it or give me a newer model. This can go on for twenty years or longer. I will keep getting new tv's. I don't have to worry about the coaxial connection, that's the cable companies problem. If your system is grounded properly your ok. If you are connecting the cables yourself it doesn't matter to the insurance policy, they Still pay up. Buy the warranty or start a post like this and hope for the best. Make any sense now? I hope so.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

It doesn't cost $200, it's costs under $60 and yes it's renewable. Beware of BB's high priced warranty plans, or any other ripoff price. Yes people do what I did all the time, that's how I found out. It's a gamble I know but I keep winning.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

I live in Wisconsin, it's a long drive from California. If you're willing to make the trip I'll tell you.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaFan63 View Post

Are you willing to buy online and have a $$$-$$$$ Tv shipping across the country? I wouldn't. What are you going to do when it needs repairs?, Ship it back?, I wouldn't. The repair guys are local. Do some research and you'll find a local store where you live that will take care of you guys. It's kind of a moot point to name the place if you aren't willing to have your new Tv's shipped and handled by guys who are jealous of you and might accidentally drop it.

 

 

You're contradicting yourself. First you say you've never had a tv or electronic blow out and how you're 50 years old. Then you talk about your 'renewable' three year warranties. Where is your logic in this? If apparently you've never had anything die on you, why keep re-renewing your warranty? Also, you brag about your 60 dollar warranty but don't wanna tell us who warrants you and for Randy to come drive to you so you could tell him? Like what? How else are we supposed to believe you. Btw who thinks like you? Who is gonna drop a customers tv because they're "jealous"? That's their job. People can get fired. I'm sorry but you're tainting my thread with your nonsense. You're trying to make this thread all about you when I made this thread to get opinions and information about surge protection.

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post #21 of 24 Old 12-05-2013, 08:05 PM
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I'm done with this thread. I was going to talk to the media relations dept. of the company and see if they wanted to increase their sales. I may yet, in the meantime, good luck and best wishes.

I remember when products were built to last.
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post #22 of 24 Old 12-05-2013, 10:23 PM - Thread Starter
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I cant protect at the box because I live in an apartment. Btw, I am connecting coax directly to the TV, from the wall. So you're saying that it would be better running my coax through an MOV surge protector (the one that I linked), than to run it through an in-line protector. My understanding is that MOV's work by shunting the surge to the ground in the protector, then the surge goes to the ground in the outlet?

 

 

olyteddy I wanna wrap this up. I'm guessing there isnt an easy way to ground an in-line coax surge protector and that it HAS to be grounded some way or another.

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post #23 of 24 Old 12-06-2013, 07:08 AM
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You are at the mercy of the cable co but you can be (reasonably) sure that the cable is bonded out in the lockbox. An in-line lightning or surge arrestor won't do you any good because you're not going to get a lightning hit in an apartment and you have no place to dissipate it to if you did. Looping it through the power strip isn't going to adversely affect your picture quality unless there's another problem with the cable (low levels, high noise) and if the F-61s on the power strip are connected to ground could eliminate any ground loop problem that could arise.


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post #24 of 24 Old 12-06-2013, 03:06 PM - Thread Starter
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Alright. Looks like I'm sticking with my MOV surge protector strip. Thank you everybody for replying! 

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