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post #31 of 41 Old 01-13-2014, 06:14 PM
 
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^That's one theory (D-Nice would probably beg to differ)... wink.gif

This thread should actually be merged with the ZT60 owner's thread, as all these topics have been covered there and this is just cluttering the forum with redundancy.

One thing to note is breaking in won't diminish the IR susceptibility of the panel, ever, necessarily. The break-in is more or less for accelerating the aging of the phosphors in order to get a calibration. The panel undergoes the most physical changes in the first 300 hours, so full-screen content in over that period is another way to ensure more equitable aging.
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post #32 of 41 Old 01-13-2014, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by housequestion 

Sorry, but when the screen is just showing black it's being used. It's not as if only the parts of the screen that are showing something moving are turned on.

If you have a 4:3 Image on a 16:9 screen. You are not using the whole screen, therefore you have to fairly large portions of the screen that are aging much slower than the middle portion. Obviously the black pillar bars are on (unlike OLED) but they will are still not aging as quickly as the middle portion which is why they will eventually seem a tad bit lighter than the middle portion.

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post #33 of 41 Old 01-13-2014, 10:00 PM - Thread Starter
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The reason I asked about the 4:3 content and letterboxed content is due to the aspect ratio. I'm sick of watching distorted people cavort around on my screen. I have a lot of DVDs that will never see the light of a Blu-Ray day and they are still worth watching. Also some widescreen movies are filmed in even wider screen than 16:9 and they show up as letterboxed. I would just find it hard to believe you always have to keep your plasma on 16:9 material only or zoom it. It seems to me watching an occasional 4:3 or letterboxed movie should be all right after the panel gets "broken in" a bit.

I checked tonight when I got home and I have a 139 hours on the ZT60.

I appreciate everyone's responses though.
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post #34 of 41 Old 01-13-2014, 10:09 PM
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If you have 136 hours then in my opinion: you're set. watch all the content you have in its native aspect ration. You've hit the mark. What I'm warning you about though is abuse, I.e watching 4 seasons of It's always sunny in Philadelphia (which is 4:3) in a row. But be aware of what you're watching and its effect on your TVs panel, at least until you hit that 300 hour mark which to some is the unofficial end of the break-in period. That's why most pro calibrators won't touch your tv til you hit 300.
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post #35 of 41 Old 01-13-2014, 10:13 PM
 
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It's the nature of the plasma beast unfortunately. If 70% of your viewing involves, for example, 2.35:1 AR films, the middle portion of the screen will age unevenly in comparison to the letterbox area. Having owned a Kuro and after putting 2000 hours of mainly movies (in their correct ARs) on it, the difference in wear manifested in the outer bars, which were less dark than the middle portion of the screen, and sometimes this distractingly showed up on dimmer full-screen content. What we need are specifically formatted 2.35:1 slides to help offset this. tongue.gif
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post #36 of 41 Old 01-13-2014, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinnie97 View Post

It's the nature of the plasma beast unfortunately. If 70% of your viewing involves, for example, 2.35:1 AR films, the middle portion of the screen will age unevenly in comparison to the letterbox area. Having owned a Kuro and after putting 2000 hours of mainly movies (in their correct ARs) on it, the difference in wear manifested in the outer bars, which were less dark than the middle portion of the screen, and sometimes this distractingly showed up on dimmer full-screen content. What we need are specifically formatted 2.35:1 slides to help offset this. tongue.gif

I actually had to create some of those for the pillarbox burn in that I created watching 4:3 content all day. Takes forever but it eventually catches up
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post #37 of 41 Old 01-14-2014, 11:02 AM
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Merchantord - Glad to see you didn't return your TV. I would agree with most posts here that you are probably fine watching shows in their native aspect ratio. I say this only if you watch a lot of different content. If the majority of what you watch doesn't fill the screen then I'd be careful and not go over a couple hours with those black bars. At 100 hours I personally watched one movie per night lasting maybe 2 hours and no IR occurred. My personality wouldn't allow me to watch much with black bars under the 200 hour mark.

As for black bars and screen aging; it’s true that the entire screen is on when black bars are shown. I think what others are trying to say is that the screen is not aged evenly. Sure, it has the same amount of hours, but those phosphors have been used at different intensities. We're not worried about the plasma itself. The effectiveness of the plasma gas isn't going to change from different levels of pulse width modulation intensities. The phosphors that glow from the plasma UV light passing through them will age, and they age more rapidly during the first 200 hours. This is why it is recommended to stay away from black bars. Sure, it's not going to help IR in the future, but it certainly helps not getting IR right now. This is also why many people run slides making sure that red, green, blue, and various contrast levels from dark to white are shown. They do this so every pixel is doing the same thing. I think the jury is out on whether this is totally necessary and I personally wouldn't be surprised if data showed it wasn't. One very nice advantage from doing this (besides peace of mind) is that you can hit the 200 hour mark fast. I ran my TV day/night with slides, watching what I wanted when I wanted, and turning things off for an hour every so often to cycle the electronics which would let the TV cool down. I didn't care if it blew the TV. If that sort of abuse was going to kill the TV then hopefully it did so I could return it.  Now that I’m passed the 200 hour mark I don’t worry.  I’ll throw on the white screen scroll just to see the uniformity of the panel and to check for IR, and nothing.  If you’re worried, try this more often while you’re under 200 hours and see if anything is present.   

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post #38 of 41 Old 01-18-2014, 12:30 AM - Thread Starter
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@janix No I still have it! :-)

I appreciate everyone's responses and they have been both helpful and instructive. I realise there is likely some duplication with the ZT owners thread but as that thread is several hundred pages long, finding specific information even with the search function can be a chore and since it has been running for a while, some information may no longer be current and that was why I started this thread relative to my own situation.

I didn't go with an OTA antenna. Where I'm located it would have necessitated climbing out on the roof or erecting a pole to mount a large multiband antenna in the hopes of picking up viable signals and with the temperatures on the low side and my time around the house in short suppy, I didn't feel like fooling with it. So I signed up for Dish Network's Top 200 HD feed. It's not ideal but it will do for now I suppose.

One thing I have noticed while watching certain stations (not all of them) is that the picture appears to "jump" almost as if a frame has dropped or something. Has anyone else ever noticed this with their satellite HD feed? Is there a setting I need to check or alter? I hope I'm describing this correctly or at least in such a way that it makes sense.
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post #39 of 41 Old 01-19-2014, 03:36 PM - Thread Starter
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I went in and made a few adjustments on the satellite receiver and that appears to have addressed the "stutter" issue.

On the other hand, just out of curiosity, I spoke with Panasonic tech support twice today about the subject of IR and when it is safe to mix in some more letterboxed content in their (Panasonic's) opinion. The first tech didn't even know what letterboxed content was so I quickly ended that discussion and got online in a chat session. That tech at least knew what letterboxed content was but said that any such content should never comprise more than 15% of the total daily viewing time. I could not get her to give me a source for that figure only that Panasonic "'had made that determination and she was sorry for the inconvenience'"--end of story. I believe these panels are a little more robust than that and I was wondering if anyone out there had any thoughts on this?
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post #40 of 41 Old 01-26-2014, 02:20 AM
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Image retention is something that can (and definitely will) happen on any plasma tv. Burn-in is something that is far more difficult. Image retention fades quickly and is usually only visible for a second when the screen quickly fades to black.

Like I said before, if you watch only letterbox content, the middle portion will age at a different rate so you will see a slightly different shade of color along the sides of the tv that are usually displaying black. For movies I would leave it as it is, but I have 4:3 cable content that I stretch to fill the screen. Old black and white 4:3 movies I leave at their native aspect ratio. It's not to avoid IR. It's not to avoid burn-in. It's to keep the entire panel aged evenly.
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post #41 of 41 Old 01-26-2014, 04:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merchantord View Post

I went in and made a few adjustments on the satellite receiver and that appears to have addressed the "stutter" issue.

On the other hand, just out of curiosity, I spoke with Panasonic tech support twice today about the subject of IR and when it is safe to mix in some more letterboxed content in their (Panasonic's) opinion. The first tech didn't even know what letterboxed content was so I quickly ended that discussion and got online in a chat session. That tech at least knew what letterboxed content was but said that any such content should never comprise more than 15% of the total daily viewing time. I could not get her to give me a source for that figure only that Panasonic "'had made that determination and she was sorry for the inconvenience'"--end of story. I believe these panels are a little more robust than that and I was wondering if anyone out there had any thoughts on this?


As a reference point, I had a Pioneer Plasma that as far as I know, didn't have any temporary image retention effects.

I rarely watch 4:3 content but on occasion I would. Probably less than the 15% that the CSR mentioned. Did not stretch it as I'd rather enjoy the show than be viewing some distorted image.

After 6 years of use, you could see that the sidebars had slightly more blue in the grayscale than the center 4:3 area. Something that a non OCD on pq person would never noticed.

Although I didn't watch very much content in 4:3, I'd say that its reasonable to assume that if you keep you panel long enough, you're going to see some difference across the panel.

Same would likely apply for those long skinny films in the letterbox format.

As many have said before, each technology has its quirks. You just have to base your purchase decision on which ones are most important to you.
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