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-   -   Panasonic ST60: Pixelation and connectivity (http://www.avsforum.com/forum/167-plasma-flat-panel-displays/1594090-panasonic-st60-pixelation-connectivity.html)

Dungeonlord 07-07-2014 04:18 AM

Panasonic ST60: Pixelation and connectivity
 
Hello everyone
I bought my first smart TV; a TX-P50ST60E.
I hope this is the right section to post some question. If not i Apologize and i appreciate any suggestion on the right section. I have 2 simple questions regarding some pixelation issues and the PC-Tablet-TV
1 - I noticed that i have pixelation during fast moving scene while playing a movie (MKV or MP4 of around 7GB). Playing the movie "streaming it" from the DLNA server (The Tv is connected to the PC through a router with an ethernet cable) or a Hard drive directly connected to the TV doesn't make a difference. Setting the noise reduction and Motion smoother to ON or OFF doesn't also make a difference. My questions is : is it a problem of the file or there is something i'm doing wrong? If it is the file what would be the best file format?
2 -What i would like to do is have my movies on the pc and acces the library from my couch with the tablet (from which i could see a trailer or synopsis or other infos). After browsing the library i want to launch the movie from the tablet without going through the menu screens of the TV. I set up a DLNA connection with an Home group but there is no interface with the Android tablet i have. My question is: what would be the best app/software to set up a PC-Tablet-ST60 network?

Latinoheat 07-07-2014 11:48 AM

I don't have an ST60 but I have the GT50. I have my tv connected to my HTPC via HDMI and can control everything my with my iPad or Logitech harmony one remote. My HTPC has 4tb and an external 4tb hardrive. I can play all my bluray MKV's no problem whatsoever. The program I use in my HTPC is XBMC or Home Classic Media player. It plays them all in 1080p with HD Audio as well. I don't use DLNA since my HTPC is wired to the tv. Only time I use it is if I want to see my pictures from my phone on the big screen mirror in it.

Dungeonlord 07-08-2014 03:05 AM

I suppose that my connection of the PC to the TV is different from the one you mentioned for the HTPC. Anyway my main concern really rely on the image quality at the moment. I would like to know in which direction should i go to prevent the pixelation during moviing scene:
-is it the file
-the streaming DLNA server
-the ethernet connetion/router
-some TV settings

Any advice is more than welcome

Josh128 07-08-2014 03:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dungeonlord (Post 25571442)
I suppose that my connection of the PC to the TV is different from the one you mentioned for the HTPC. Anyway my main concern really rely on the image quality at the moment. I would like to know in which direction should i go to prevent the pixelation during moviing scene:
-is it the file
-the streaming DLNA server
-the ethernet connetion/router
-some TV settings

Any advice is more than welcome

Its the file, not the TV. MPEG-2/4/ H.264 standards are video compression formats. The pixelation you are seeing during motion is one of the tricks used during compression. It is present, to varying degrees, an all digitally compressed HD content. Blu-Rays will have the least, as they need the least compression. Satellite and streaming internet HD generally show the most.

Dungeonlord 07-08-2014 05:25 AM

Great! thank you very much!
And usually what video codec cause the least problems?

Josh128 07-08-2014 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dungeonlord (Post 25573113)
Great! thank you very much!
And usually what video codec cause the least problems?

Its not on your end (yours is the decode end), it occurs when the content provider encodes, or compresses, the content before its sent to you over the airways or the internet.

High bitrate MPEG4/h.264 yields less macroblocking in fast moving scenes. Basically the higher the bitrate, the less compressed the video is. You have absolutely no control over this, all you do is decode or decompress the video thats sent to you.

If you want to see what completely uncompressed video motion looks like, fire up a PC or high def console video game console and play a game (not in game video, but the game itself). If broadcast video didnt have to be compressed, uncompressed 720p would look worlds better than any 1080p you could stream today...unfortunately, thats not possible!


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