HDMI High Speed Cable - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
04rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 605
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Hey Guys, I am looking at fetting a fairly long (at least 35' to 40') HDMI cable. I want it to be high speed and future proof (supports 4k, 1080p etc) as it will be in the wall and i dont want to have to replace it obviously. I looked at Monprice, but their High Speed cable stops at 25'. Is there another place that meets my criteria that i can get a cable from? I am hoping it is on the less expensive side as well, like Monoprice.

Thanks
04rex is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 11:47 AM
 
alk3997's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by 04rex View Post

Hey Guys, I am looking at fetting a fairly long (at least 35' to 40') HDMI cable. I want it to be high speed and future proof (supports 4k, 1080p etc) as it will be in the wall and i dont want to have to replace it obviously. I looked at Monprice, but their High Speed cable stops at 25'. Is there another place that meets my criteria that i can get a cable from? I am hoping it is on the less expensive side as well, like Monoprice.
Thanks

No. Check the archives of the forum and you'll find that high speed cables stop just after 25'. You can also look at Redmere technology cables that will get you out to around 40' when they become available. You could also convert to Cat 6 or go HD-BaseT. Optical is a more expensive option. The key is to make sure that any format you would want (such as 4K) is explicitly listed as compatible with the cable you choose.

You could also use a standard speed high gauge HDMI cable - many of us do for 1080p and 3D and it works. Will it work out with 4K? Maybe. The key is that the higher the gauge the better the odds of the cable working, it seems.

BTW, the best advice I can give you for your in-wall installation is conduit. That way you can replace the cable when the latest and greatest cable comes along. Ten years ago you probably wouldn't have put HDMI in-wall. Ten years from now, who knows what the newest cable will be. Also if your HDMI connectors are ever damaged, they usually can't be fixed. Conduit solves that problem in allowing you to replace the cable.
alk3997 is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 01:07 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
04rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 605
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 19
On monoprices website, for their 22AWG 35ft HDMI cable, it states that it is capable of only 720p/1080i. It doesnt mentioned 1080p at all. 4K realisticaly isnt a big deal. Its the 1080p which is.
04rex is offline  
post #4 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 02:43 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by 04rex View Post

On monoprices website...it states that it is capable of only 720p/1080i.
No, it says it ""has sufficient bandwidth to transfer 720p/1080i video signals...". It doesn't say anything about higher resolutions. It is a specification of the minimum capabilitiies or the cable, not maximum. The cable will actually handle higher resolutions, just not the full HDMI bandwidth required to be called a high speed cable. Lots of folks are doing 1080p60 2D and 1080p24 3D at 24 bits per pixel with cables like that one and longer. Exactly how much you can push though the cable is going to depend on the cable, all the electronics involved, and your environment.

Think about it. A 25' high speed HDMI cable does not go from being capable of handling full HDMI bandwidth to being capable of handling less than 1/4 of it if it grows by one foot. It may not be able to handle full bandwidth any longer, but it will still be able to handle very close to full bandwidth. The bandwidth it can handle is a function of length. The longer the cable, the less bandwidth it can handle, all other things being equal. FWIW 1080p60 at 24 bits per pixel is a bit less than half full bandwidth.
Colm is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
04rex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 605
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 19
Thanks for the info. Just to compare though, on their site, if you go to the 22AWG high speed it does say 1080p. But I understand what you are saying. That it doesnt reach exactly the highest point of bandwith. Basically, as long as it has enough juice to do 3D and 1080 P at about 30 ft, than that works for me.
04rex is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 05:53 PM
 
alk3997's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by 04rex View Post

Thanks for the info. Just to compare though, on their site, if you go to the 22AWG high speed it does say 1080p. But I understand what you are saying. That it doesnt reach exactly the highest point of bandwith. Basically, as long as it has enough juice to do 3D and 1080 P at about 30 ft, than that works for me.

Of course it does. It is a high speed cable. Here's the basics...

There are only two types of HDMI cables - standard speed and high speed. Both have a number of options as well (such as Ethernet signal over HDMI).

More information on the two types of cables are at the HDMI Org's FAQ. This is at: http://www.hdmi.org/learningcenter/faq.aspx#49

Both high speed and standard speed have the exact same pin-outs. The difference between the two is that the high speed has been *certified* for the highest HDMI bandwidths envisioned. So, it can (hopefully) handle all future formats under HDMI.

However, at just after 25 feet no one has been able to produce a passive cable that can be certified as high speed. Luckily, as Colm said, 1080p/60 requires nowhere near the full high speed bandwidth. It's not "juice" since with the wrong cable, adding more power just makes the bits more ratty.

Does this mean that there are no 26 foot and up cables that can handle the full HDMI bandwidth. No. It just means it is not possible to certify that the entire cable stock will handle the highest bandwidth. And, if a manufacturer can't certify to full bandwidth then they should specify the cable as standard speed, which means only 1080i/720p is guaranteed. For the rest, you must test...
alk3997 is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 07:18 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by alk3997 View Post

Does this mean that there are no 26 foot and up cables that can handle the full HDMI bandwidth. No...
...if for no other reason than HDMI testing is done under really conservative conditions, conditions you are not likely to encounter in the home. IOW you are likely to get better mileage than can be produced under lab conditions.
Colm is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 07:27 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by 04rex View Post

...as long as it has enough juice...
Well, almost... It is more a question of whether the signal looks enough like the original to recognize. The analogy I use is that of those internet applications that require you to enter text displayed in distorted form to stop bots from accessing the site. As long as the text is just recognizable, no matter how distorted, you enter the correct text and get into the site.
Colm is offline  
Reply HDMI Q&A - The One Connector World



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off