Splitting Comcast DVR HDMI Signal to Share in Two Different Rooms - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 02-10-2013, 03:52 PM - Thread Starter
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I am looking to save a few $$ and to be able to watch my DVR in the bedroom so I am looking to share the signal from my Comcast Motorola DVR between my bedroom and living room. The two rooms share a wall and both TV's backup to that wall. I have been researching this and I know I need an HDMI splitter that supports HDCP. My main question is about resolution. The living room TV is a 60" 1080P Samsung DLP and the bedroom is a 40" 720p Samsung LCD. My understanding is the splitter (I am looking at the one at the link below) will downgrade the signal to the highest signal that is supported by both TVs. Is this still correct if I am only using one TV at a time?


Also, what do you have any suggestions for what to use to be able to control the DVR (located in the living room) from the bedroom?

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,

Tim



http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10113&cs_id=1011306&p_id=8204&seq=1&format=2
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post #2 of 8 Old 02-10-2013, 05:46 PM
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I don't have an answer for you but I would like to pose another question for people in the know. Assuming that his DVR has both, can the OP output to the 60" TV via HDMI and the 40" TV via component cables? I don't know if his DVR will output both at the same time.

We are here to help you. Please help us to help you. If you provide incomplete information, at best, we can give you an incomplete response.
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post #3 of 8 Old 02-10-2013, 06:39 PM
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well, depends on the actual box, but a lot of set top boxes output stuff out of all connector regardless of whether they are connected or not AND thus that is a solution since component connects to a display are just as good as HDMI connections especially on short distances and "reasonable" quality cables (component).

as for the OP, the highest common "capability" will likely be your result regardless on the state of the unused display since most times / units are in "standby" when not ON which still causes some interaction on the HDMI. In your case, not sure it matters, but depends on the models involved and the options that are set.
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post #4 of 8 Old 02-11-2013, 06:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Joost View Post

I am looking to save a few $$ and to be able to watch my DVR in the bedroom so I am looking to share the signal from my Comcast Motorola DVR between my bedroom and living room. The two rooms share a wall and both TV's backup to that wall. I have been researching this and I know I need an HDMI splitter that supports HDCP. My main question is about resolution. The living room TV is a 60" 1080P Samsung DLP and the bedroom is a 40" 720p Samsung LCD. My understanding is the splitter (I am looking at the one at the link below) will downgrade the signal to the highest signal that is supported by both TVs. Is this still correct if I am only using one TV at a time?

...

Actually the distribution amp (splitter) doesn't change the resolution. The source is the only thing that would change the resolution and it does this based on the EDID packets it receives from the TVs. When one TV is connected, the source receives the EDID from that TV and says, OK I can sent out a signal that is compatible with that one TV. When both TVs are connected, the source responds by sending out a signal that is compatible with both TVs. The splitter didn't do that, the source did. You could say that the splitter facilitated it since it allowed both EDIDs to reach the source but that's about the extent of it. Remember, no matter what you do, only one video and one audio stream can be sent over HDMI at a single time.

In your case using component video and HDMI simultaneously would make sense. Unfortunately, whether you can send different resolutions over component versus HDMI will depend upon the cable box. Also keep in mind that just because a TV (particularly a later model) only shows 720p doesn't mean it can't accept 1080p as an input. You'll have to check the owners manual. Also remember that for a cable box the signal going into the cable box is either 1080i or 720p, so 1080p output from the cable box isn't really buying you anything. If you can output 1080i from component and 1080p/1080i from HDMI then you're getting the equivalent picture quality from both. And yes, unless you unplug the TV from the AC power when you aren't using it, it is possible that the TV is still active over HDMI when in standby mode and therefore the lowest common denominator will still apply even if one TV is "off".

As far as a remote solution, some cable boxes have RF remotes for this reason. If not, you'll have to check for a IR repeater solution that would work between walls. Places like Smarthome sell tons of those. Or try one of the sections in the AVSForum, such as Home Automation, for more information.

Either way, if you have component video output along with HDMI and both are active simultaneously, you don't need a distribution amp (splitter) to do what you want to do.
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post #5 of 8 Old 02-11-2013, 10:22 AM
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Andy... maybe I misunderstand your statement "Actually the distribution amp (splitter) doesn't change the resolution...", but it may indirectly IF it can modify the EDID that is ultimately sent to the source... thus causing a resolution that is different than would normally be expect. My understanding, there are some splitters that are able to modify/manage EDID's. Yes, only one signal "type" can be sent out and thru the hdmi connections.
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-11-2013, 03:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by budwich View Post

Andy... maybe I misunderstand your statement "Actually the distribution amp (splitter) doesn't change the resolution...", but it may indirectly IF it can modify the EDID that is ultimately sent to the source... thus causing a resolution that is different than would normally be expect. My understanding, there are some splitters that are able to modify/manage EDID's. Yes, only one signal "type" can be sent out and thru the hdmi connections.

What I should have said was the the distribution amp's changing of the EDID is purely based on the attached displays. The distribution amp by itself will not change the resolution but attaching a different display will cause the distribution amp to either modify the EDID into a combined one or choose the lesser of the two (or more, if more sinks) EDIDs coming from the sinks, depending upon the implementation chosen by the designer.

A good refresher on EDIDs is at:
media.extron.com/download/files/whitepaper/edid_guide_wp.pdf
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-13-2013, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alk3997 View Post

And yes, unless you unplug the TV from the AC power when you aren't using it, it is possible that the TV is still active over HDMI when in standby mode and therefore the lowest common denominator will still apply even if one TV is "off".

It is not only possible, but it is normal that a TV EDID table is available over HDMI when the TV is in the stand-by mode.

But some HDMI splitters (e.g. nSplitter Pro QS) can detect if the TV is active or in stand-by and can ignore the EDID tables from TVs, which are in the stand-by mode.
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-19-2013, 12:06 PM
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Tim,

You should post your model number comcast DVR box.
If you have a Motorola DCX3400, the HDMI and component outputs are both outputting at the same time.


From the link:

"While both HDMI and Component video outputs work at the same time time, the HDMI resolution takes priority so if you plan on using both outputs to feed two different displays then both displays must have the same resolution capabilities otherwise the HDMI display will only work and the component video display will not sync if it is a lower resolution than the HDMI display."
http://techtipsandtoys.wordpress.com/2011/01/16/motorola-dcx3400-pvr-cable-box-review/

I was researching this as a way to "show off" for the superbowl. My new Panasonic 65vt50 was delivered but the final location is not ready yet (basement remodel).
So, to get good use out of it, I put it next to my Pioneer Elite Kuro.



As for how to control the DVR, use this:
https://itunes.apple.com/app/xfinity-tv/id401629893
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