Another CAT-6/Ethernet Question - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 30 Old 02-14-2013, 03:37 PM - Thread Starter
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I apologize for starting another thread on this subject but I admittedly got a little lost with the current CAT6/7 over HDMI discussion. We are going to be remodeling our kitchen this spring. The kitchen basically separates the computer room (where the router is) and the family room. We're going to raise the ceiling in the kitchen so there will be attic work involved. A perfect time to lay conduit with cable between the computer room and the family room. I'm looking at about maybe 60' - 70' total. I've done a run of comparable length for my security cameras (camera DVR to router using CAT-5e to HDMI) and it works fine for that. But the cameras are not HD nor is there any audio. I just want to be able to connect my blu-ray player and AppleTV2 to ethernet if WiFI doesn't work well after the kitchen remodeling (we're moving some appliances around and there may be interference.
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post #2 of 30 Old 02-14-2013, 11:28 PM
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Is you question about networking or HDMI? Sounds like the former, but you mix in HDMI in the title and discussion. If it is networking, the distance is not a problem. And you would be better off wired than using wifi.
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post #3 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 10:29 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Colm View Post

Is you question about networking or HDMI? Sounds like the former, but you mix in HDMI in the title and discussion. If it is networking, the distance is not a problem. And you would be better off wired than using wifi.

Sorry for not being clear. I sometimes short circuit when multi-tasking. What I meant was would it be a simple thing to run CAT-6 cabling from the computer room to the family room and then use ethernet to connect the blu-ray/ATV2 so that I could use that instead of WiFi for streaming in case the kitchen remodeling introduces interference? I know CAT-5e works for my security cameras for about the same distance (CAT-5e to ethernet) but that does not carry HD video or any audio at all. Which brings to mind another question. Would there be any appreciable loss of signal if I use a simple ethernet switch so that both (or more) devices can be connected to the single ethernet port?
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post #4 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 10:42 AM
 
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Otto, if you are trying to run HD over Ethernet, rather than HDMI over Cat 5e/6, then you have 1 gbps to work with. Unfortunately your effective rate may be slower. So what you would have to do is figure out the loading on your Ethernet and then work out if the compressed HD bandwidth would fit. How much loss do you consider acceptable would also be a consideration?

If I were you, I'd run a second line and just use HDMI over Cat 5e/6, whether that be a HDBaseT or some other solution. Then keep your Ethernet data and the A/V separate. Then you really don't have to worry about Ethernet loading as you add more network devices (wired or wi-fi).
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post #5 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by alk3997 View Post

Otto, if you are trying to run HD over Ethernet, rather than HDMI over Cat 5e/6, then you have 1 gbps to work with. Unfortunately your effective rate may be slower. So what you would have to do is figure out the loading on your Ethernet and then work out if the compressed HD bandwidth would fit. How much loss do you consider acceptable would also be a consideration?

If I were you, I'd run a second line and just use HDMI over Cat 5e/6, whether that be a HDBaseT or some other solution. Then keep your Ethernet data and the A/V separate. Then you really don't have to worry about Ethernet loading as you add more network devices (wired or wi-fi).

Damn! I knew this was going to get complicated, that's why I got lost in the other thread. Old dog, new tricks kind of a thing frown.gif What I was hoping to do was run the CAT-6 to both rooms and then terminate the line with an ethernet port. The computer room would then connect to the router via ethernet. The family room would connect to a switch via ethernet so that I could use the ethernet port on the devices to connect them to the CAT-6 line. The devices would then be connected via HDMI to the receiver. Router -> ethernet -> CAT-6 ->ethernet -> switch -> devices ethernet -> devices HDMI -> receiver. I don't plan on using the connection for laptop connections, just streaming via the blu-ray and ATV2 apps. The rest of the family room will still be able to connect reliably to WiFi. The problem is that the HTS shares the same wall as the kitchen, and we will be placing a double oven basically directly behind the HTS, which may interfere with the WiFi signal at that point. Currently, WiFi is very good with only the refrigerator on the other side of the wall with cabinetry. After the remodel, it will be the refrigerator and the double oven. I suppose I could buy CAT-6 cable, port adapters, and a switch and run all that along the floor to see if it would work before we start the remodel job but that's an expensive test if it doesn't work. I don't need to run power to anything just a wired connection so that I can stream. I know that straight ethernet won't work at that distance for HD video/audio because it didn't work initially with my security cam system and that's why I went with CAT-5e to CAT-5 ethernet. Thanks for being patient guys.
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post #6 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 02:49 PM
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Otto – this old dog is still confused by your descriptions smile.gif

I thought I was following you until the second last line and you introduced HD video/audio over Ethernet!

Assuming you have your files stored on a NAS, PC or MAC hard wired to your Router and your Networked Media Streamer also hard wired to your Router (via your network switch if required) with the Media Streamer HDMI Out connected to your HDMI equipped TV or AVR your ought to be good to go.

If you are talking about sending the Media Streamer HDMI Output via x1 or x2 CAT6 cables that is a different proposition and requires HDMI over Twisted Pair, HDMI over HDBaseT or HDMI over Coax Transmitter and Receiver technology.

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post #7 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 03:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Gentlemen, I am sorry that I'm making this more confusing than it needs to be and I don't want to waste your time with my question. All I want to do is wire my blu-ray player and AppleTV2 to my LAN so I don't have to use WiFi when I stream from either the blu-ray player's apps or the ATV2's. That's all. I don't have, or use, a media player or have any files stored on a HD.
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post #8 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 05:06 PM
 
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Otto, I think what is confusing us (at least me) is your use of "stream". The streaming usually goes into the Blu-Ray player apps and into the TV apps from the Internet. It's basically Internet lingo for send stuff out of the server to the stream player, which is an app on your Blu-Ray disc player or TV. The goes-out-ofs are uncompressed HDMI if you are using a Blu-Ray player.

Are you asking how to send HDMI out of the player over Cat 6/5e or are you asking about the streaming inputs to the Blu-Ray player? I'm lost when you are talking about streaming out of the Blu-Ray player since that implies you are converting to an internet protocol before sending.
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post #9 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 05:24 PM - Thread Starter
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After driving home from work and thinking about what I wanted, or should have asked, I'll take a different tact. My ATV2 has an ethernet input. Assuming I turn off the WiFi and connect that directly to my router with an ethernet cable, I should be able to stream Netflix (as an example) to my receiver (via HDMI) and then off to my tv. Correct? That is what the ethernet input is for, a wired connection instead of WiFI. Now my router is not next to my tv but in another room about 60' away. I can't run an etherent cable that distance because it won't work well. I learned that when I tried to connect my security camera's DVR to my network so I could do remote viewing. The DVR is in the garage for reasons that I needn't go into here. The transmitted live picture was unwatchable. So, I connected a keystone jack to either end of a CAT-5e cable and then connected an ethernet cable to either end so I could connect the DVR at one end to the CAT-5e cable and connect my router to the other end of the CAT-5e cable. PQ is wonderful and I can remotely view my cameras and operate the DVR from work, my iPhone, or my laptop (the laptop connection is via WiFi). The security camera's resolution is 420 (or 480, can't remember) so they are not HD (720p), and no audio is transmitted either so I thought, (probably over-thought this) that why couldn't the same setup work for streaming Netflix, Vudu, Hulu, Pandora etc from the computer room to the family room. But streaming Netflix that way is not the same as a low resolution camera, hence my question. Again, I must apologize to you all because if I've confused Colm, alk3997, and Joe with my question, then I need to go sit in the corner and ponder this more. I hate feeling like such a noob but, ego aside, that's what we have to do sometimes to stay on that learning curve.
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post #10 of 30 Old 02-15-2013, 05:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alk3997 View Post

Otto, I think what is confusing us (at least me) is your use of "stream". The streaming usually goes into the Blu-Ray player apps and into the TV apps from the Internet. It's basically Internet lingo for send stuff out of the server to the stream player, which is an app on your Blu-Ray disc player or TV. The goes-out-ofs are uncompressed HDMI if you are using a Blu-Ray player.

Are you asking how to send HDMI out of the player over Cat 6/5e or are you asking about the streaming inputs to the Blu-Ray player? I'm lost when you are talking about streaming out of the Blu-Ray player since that implies you are converting to an internet protocol before sending.

Andy, thank your for staying with this. I'm talking about using a wired connection, instead of WiFi, if I want to watch Netflix using the Netflix app that is built-in to the blu-ray player or the ATV2. IOW, the ethernet/CAT-6 connection is just to make a physical connection to my router so that the blu-ray/ATV2 apps can go out to the internet as opposed to making that connection wirelessly, ie WiFI.
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post #11 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 02:43 AM
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Otto – I think it is clearer now, all you require is a long CAT cable between your Router and your ATV2 and BD Player.

I’m surprised you can’t get a decent quality of signal at 30m – possibly you were using a poorly constructed cable, I have 30m+ of CAT6 in my test rigs and can supply ATV and a BD with no obvious problem’s.

If you put a small 2-way (or larger) Ethernet ‘Hub’ on the far end of the long CAT cable you have multiple devices sharing the long cable run.

If a cable won’t work for you have a look at HomePlug – it’s not infallible as the mains wiring in an older property can restrict the quality of service but assuming a relatively decent quality mains distribution around your property HomePlug is definitely a better option than Wi-Fi for many folk.

https://www.homeplug.org/home/

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post #12 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 08:40 AM - Thread Starter
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@Joe - I don't know why I made my question so obtuse (bad week I guess) but yes, that's what I want to do. Extend my wired connection to the family room using CAT-5e or 6 cable. Then go ethernet to my blu-ray player and ATV2.

As far as the decent signal question goes, that was for my security cameras and was done with an ethernet test cable first, which didn't work, so that's why I went with CAT-5e and that worked fine. My confusion stemmed from the fact that I've never used CAT-5e before so I didn't know what it's capabilities were as far propagating an internet connection over a fairly long distance so that I would still be able to use the streaming features of my devices.

Our house is only about 30 years old so HomePlug may be a viable alternative if properly running conduit for cable won't fit into the remodel budget. Of course, if there is not WiFi interference after the remodel then it's all moot. However, running cable after the remodel would never fly so I think it would be best to be proactive and get it done now because it certainly can't hurt. WiFi is excellent now but with a double oven on the opposite side of the wall from the ATV2 and blu-ray player, who knows?

Looking at the HomePlug link you supplied, there are quite a few companies with multiple products. Who, and which product would you suggest I look at for what I want to do?
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post #13 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 09:59 AM
 
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Otto, sorry to not have responded sooner (busy weekend) but Joe is right. Just make sure you use a good Cat 6 cable and you should be fine. I use 100' Cat 6 cables in our house and don't have a problem.

For HomePlug, my experience has been that the present wiring in your house is more of a factor than which company you choose. If it is HomePlug compatible, you should be OK. The last ones I used were free from DirecTV and they worked fine. Very simple devices to use.

But, you shouldn't need them if you can run the Cat 6. Remember also that you'll need an Ethernet switch (make sure the switch is a 1gbps switch if the rest of your network is 1gbps) where the Blu Ray and Apple TV2 plug in.
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post #14 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 10:00 AM
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Hi Otto

I use and have supplied Devolo HomePlug (various models) - though I havent looked around for alternatives as they have been fine for what I have required so far.

Our house is pretty old and has a mix of old and very old wiring and lots of Wi-Fi deadspots - HomePLug is a good option for us.

What I did get caught out with was the inability to mix certain Devolo products with some other Devolo products - you have to stck with the same model around the property..

http://www.devolo.com

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post #15 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 01:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alk3997 View Post

Otto, sorry to not have responded sooner (busy weekend) but Joe is right. Just make sure you use a good Cat 6 cable and you should be fine. I use 100' Cat 6 cables in our house and don't have a problem.

For HomePlug, my experience has been that the present wiring in your house is more of a factor than which company you choose. If it is HomePlug compatible, you should be OK. The last ones I used were free from DirecTV and they worked fine. Very simple devices to use.

But, you shouldn't need them if you can run the Cat 6. Remember also that you'll need an Ethernet switch (make sure the switch is a 1gbps switch if the rest of your network is 1gbps) where the Blu Ray and Apple TV2 plug in.

No need to apologize. If I had of asked my question more coherently then this thread would have been history by now.

I'm sure I wouldn't have any problems running CAT-5e or CAT-6 but it may come down to a cost issue. The wife is a CPA in training wink.gif and will line-itemize everything on the remodeling project. Any cost savings will be included. $150 for a pair of Belkin HomePlug certified adapters vs an additional $300+ to have the contractor do it and you can see where the WAF will go smile.gif

Ethernet switches I have. The only wired connection I have to my router (Apple Extreme Base Station) is for the security cameras, everything else is wireless, so I'll have to go back and see what it handles. I never really gave much thought to the speed of the ethernet. I just plugged it into the DSL gateway and forgot about it until I installed the cameras about 6 months ago, and then I just plugged in a CAT-5e ethernet cable.
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post #16 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 01:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Joe Fernand View Post

Hi Otto

I use and have supplied Devolo HomePlug (various models) - though I havent looked around for alternatives as they have been fine for what I have required so far.

Our house is pretty old and has a mix of old and very old wiring and lots of Wi-Fi deadspots - HomePLug is a good option for us.

What I did get caught out with was the inability to mix certain Devolo products with some other Devolo products - you have to stck with the same model around the property..

http://www.devolo.com

Joe

I've just started some reading around on the HomePlug devices and it seems that I should probably use a 500Mb adapter. I saw that Belkin sells a pair of 1000Mb adapters for $150. Do any of the adapters have to be plugged directly into the wall outlet or can they be plugged into an extension cord or UPS if outlets are not available due to proximity?
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post #17 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 01:44 PM
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Extension Cords – avoid any which employ any form of mains 'filtering' as they will filter out the HomePlug signal smile.gif

UPS – haven’t ever tried that!

Joe

PS Another trick which has saved the day is using the RJ45 socket on a Sonos Zone Player (not sure if you mentioned Sonos or not).

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post #18 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 02:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

I've just started some reading around on the HomePlug devices and it seems that I should probably use a 500Mb adapter. I saw that Belkin sells a pair of 1000Mb adapters for $150. Do any of the adapters have to be plugged directly into the wall outlet or can they be plugged into an extension cord or UPS if outlets are not available due to proximity?

I can rule out most UPS (all the ones I've tried) - they act as filters.
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post #19 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 02:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Hmmm, maybe I should start a new thread for Powerline adapters because we seem to be headed in that direction. Any extension cord or UPS that has filtering would make sense not to use. So a standard, grounded extension cord from the local hardware store should work. I ran across some articles that was mentioning house wiring and how adapters won't work if the lines cross over neutral at the box but I have no real understanding on what that means or how how could check without frying myslef. I'll do plumbing and networking but I draw the line at electrical other than replacing a wall outlet so my knowledge stops there.

It seems the Belkin makes two that might meet my needs. The F5D4075 (AV+) which includes two adapters for about $150. One with a single input for connecting to the router and the other with 3 integrated inputs for connecting multiple devices at once. The other adapter, F5D4085 for about $90, is two adapters with single inputs. The first one is hard to find and the second seems to be readily available.
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post #20 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 02:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

Hmmm, maybe I should start a new thread for Powerline adapters because we seem to be headed in that direction. Any extension cord or UPS that has filtering would make sense not to use. So a standard, grounded extension cord from the local hardware store should work. I ran across some articles that was mentioning house wiring and how adapters won't work if the lines cross over neutral at the box but I have no real understanding on what that means or how how could check without frying myslef. I'll do plumbing and networking but I draw the line at electrical other than replacing a wall outlet so my knowledge stops there.

It seems the Belkin makes two that might meet my needs. The F5D4075 (AV+) which includes two adapters for about $150. One with a single input for connecting to the router and the other with 3 integrated inputs for connecting multiple devices at once. The other adapter, F5D4085 for about $90, is two adapters with single inputs. The first one is hard to find and the second seems to be readily available.

I was looking to see if someone had started a Powerline thread in the home A/V Distribution section but I don't see a specific thread.

The bottom line to your question about how your home wiring would effect the Powerline distribution is that if is a neutral crossover, you can then justify hiring someone to install the cat 6 since that would be much cheaper than changing your house wiring. The cat 6 wiring is pretty straightforward if you have the wall open. It costs about $50 for the 75' of cat 6 wire. You can get it pre-terminated (although terminating using the wall plate is perferred). Then just use two wall plates with couplers. Easy to run and easy to connect. Total cost would be under $100 if you do it yourself while the wall is open. Remember to use CL2 or CL3 cable and test the cable before putting it in-wall.

Powerline is your next best choice, followed by WiFi (and then there are the flavors of WiFi). The best way to tell if Powerline will work is to try it. Make sure you can return the adapters if they won't work. I would rather use the Powerline with the single adapter and than add an Ethernet switch. That way I don't end up with a switch in the adapter feeding another switch when you need more than 3 connections.
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post #21 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 02:51 PM
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Maximum segment length for any flavor of ethernet you will be using in the home is 100m. The length you need is not a problem if you terminate the cable properly and use the right materials. Use solid conductor cable, not stranded. The latter is intended for short patch cords, not long runs, and doesn't perform as well. Observe the minimum bend radius for the cable you use. If you cannot find out what it is, 10 times the diameter is a safe rule of thumb. You don't need conduit. Conduit is for things you may need to run in the future. There is something to be said for using name brand cable, like Belden. That is what pros typically do when they do large network installations for businesses. FWIW I didn't when I wired my house, but the runs were few, relatively short, and accessible.

You will be better off using normal hard-wired network cabling than any other option if you can do it. Wifi and power line devices are more susceptible to interference.
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post #22 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

I've just started some reading around on the HomePlug devices and it seems that I should probably use a 500Mb adapter. I saw that Belkin sells a pair of 1000Mb adapters for $150. Do any of the adapters have to be plugged directly into the wall outlet or can they be plugged into an extension cord or UPS if outlets are not available due to proximity?

I just did a bit of research this weekend as I was strongly considering a powerline. They pretty much all say that they need to be plugged directly into a wall outlet. That was a big issue for me as my plugs are limited. I'm not sure how valid that claim is or if they are just covering themselves. If it helps you, there are some that have plugs built into them so you can piggyback electronics.

We are here to help you. Please help us to help you. If you provide incomplete information, at best, we can give you an incomplete response.
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post #23 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 03:37 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alk3997 View Post

I was looking to see if someone had started a Powerline thread in the home A/V Distribution section but I don't see a specific thread.

The bottom line to your question about how your home wiring would effect the Powerline distribution is that if is a neutral crossover, you can then justify hiring someone to install the cat 6 since that would be much cheaper than changing your house wiring. The cat 6 wiring is pretty straightforward if you have the wall open. It costs about $50 for the 75' of cat 6 wire. You can get it pre-terminated (although terminating using the wall plate is perferred). Then just use two wall plates with couplers. Easy to run and easy to connect. Total cost would be under $100 if you do it yourself while the wall is open. Remember to use CL2 or CL3 cable and test the cable before putting it in-wall.

Powerline is your next best choice, followed by WiFi (and then there are the flavors of WiFi). The best way to tell if Powerline will work is to try it. Make sure you can return the adapters if they won't work. I would rather use the Powerline with the single adapter and than add an Ethernet switch. That way I don't end up with a switch in the adapter feeding another switch when you need more than 3 connections.

The only wall that may be open is the one in the kitchen where we are going to place the double oven (which will be exactly opposite the HTS on the other side) because I think they will have to run 220 in there for the ovens. However, there is no reason to open the wall in the computer room so I'm not sure how that will work. My thought is to use pvc pipe as the conduit up the wall, across the attic, and down the wall. That way if I ever have to pull or replace cable in the future, I don't have to crawl around the attic. Or is that not realistic? I'll have them run the CAT5e or 6 and leave about a foot or so open at either end. I can then wire it to a Keystone jack or what ever that has a nice wall plate. Of course I'd lay it all out on the floor first and test it before they do anything. We have lots of time to figure this out cause we haven't even talked to our contractor yet (we're still deciding on the appliances) but I'd like to settle this asap. The adapter would be the easiest to do and to convince (WAF). I like the idea of the single adapter and a switch instead of the three port adapter (it's cheaper and available too).
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post #24 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 03:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Use solid conductor cable, not stranded. The latter is intended for short patch cords, not long runs, and doesn't perform as well. Observe the minimum bend radius for the cable you use.

I did some homework when I installed the camera system and used solid core conductor cable, which is a bit stiffer than stranded, and was planning on using the same again. The cable shouldn't be bent much other than where it exists/enters the wall. I had thought about making a small loose circle if there is room in the wall plate as well for some extra "backup" length.
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post #25 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 03:45 PM - Thread Starter
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I just did a bit of research this weekend as I was strongly considering a powerline. They pretty much all say that they need to be plugged directly into a wall outlet. That was a big issue for me as my plugs are limited. I'm not sure how valid that claim is or if they are just covering themselves. If it helps you, there are some that have plugs built into them so you can piggyback electronics.

Do you remember which ones those were (built-in plugs)? I just researched a few that were listed on the HomePlug site that Joe referenced? I've always had good luck with Belkin products so I was leaning towards them. The single port adapters are on Amazon and we have Amazon Prime but I'm open to any and all suggestions.
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post #26 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 03:54 PM
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Power line devices are indeed tempting. But getting them to work reliably can be problematic. First consider your house wiring. Normal network wiring is continuous, with gas tight crimp or punch down connections except where a jack and a plug connect. You home wiring is a patch work of daisy chained short cables connected with wire nuts if you live in a typical American house. If you live in an older house with knob and tube wiring, that is a whole other world. Add to that the typical residential grade receptacles don't provide a very good connection to start with and get worse with age. Besides hindering the signal, those bad connections generate noise.

Even if your wiring is first rate, there are other problems. The typical American house is served by 240V single phase 3-wire power. That is split into two 120V legs at the service entrance. Unless there is a device to get the signal from one leg to the other, you will probably have problems communicating between devices on different legs. The signal has to go all the way back to, and through, the transformer that feeds your house before it comes back.

Then there are devices that have filters built into them so that they don't put noise on the line. They will also serve to reduce your signal. And there are plenty of devices that dump plenty of noise onto the line that interfere with the signal.

FWIW I played with another form of power line technology years ago, X-10 while I was redoing a house. It is very simple, using a carrier of tens of kHz at the AC zero crossing to transmit the signal. It didn't work reliably until I finished replacing all the AC receptables and switches. And it required a device at the service entrance to connect the two legs.
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I had thought about making a small loose circle if there is room in the wall plate as well for some extra "backup" length.
Yep, that is good practice. It is called a service loop.
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post #28 of 30 Old 02-18-2013, 07:38 PM
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Do you remember which ones those were (built-in plugs)? I just researched a few that were listed on the HomePlug site that Joe referenced? I've always had good luck with Belkin products so I was leaning towards them. The single port adapters are on Amazon and we have Amazon Prime but I'm open to any and all suggestions.

This is 1 that I saw:

http://www.trendnet.com/products/proddetail.asp?prod=115_TPL-402E2K&cat=178
http://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-Powerline-Ethernet-Adapter-TPL-402E2K/dp/B0050AMJXG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361245218&sr=8-1&keywords=TPL-402E2K

There have to be others as well.

We are here to help you. Please help us to help you. If you provide incomplete information, at best, we can give you an incomplete response.
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I’d agree 100% that where practical use CAT6 (solid core) though were that is not an option I have found HomePlug to be pretty reliable.

I have x2 of the Devolo units plugged into basic 4-way trailing mains blocks in separate parts of the house/office and they work fine.

I’d go with a ‘home trial’ of HomePlug before you built your plans around the Technology.

Joe

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I’d agree 100% that where practical use CAT6 (solid core) though were that is not an option I have found HomePlug to be pretty reliable.

I have x2 of the Devolo units plugged into basic 4-way trailing mains blocks in separate parts of the house/office and they work fine.

I’d go with a ‘home trial’ of HomePlug before you built your plans around the Technology.

Joe

I think that's what I'm going to do. I can get the single input Belkin pair for about $80 thru Amazon Prime. It's going to be a few months before we start tearing into walls so there's plenty of time. Even if they do work fine, I'd still like to drop a solid core CAT-6 (CL2) line down the walls, with or without conduit. I'd just have them drop the line into an outlet box with about a foot or so extending out either end. I can wire the Keystone and attach the face plate myself. What's the maximum run length for CAT-5e and CAT-6 and the difference between the two? (too lazy to Google this morning wink.gif).
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