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post #31 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 01:42 PM
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'Maybe not so much crooks as they are totally clueless ' - more likely the only 'training' the sales guy's and girl's receive is from the more expensive brands of cable and I'm sure it all 'sounds' very plausible.


There is gold plating and there is gold plating - some cables have a 'sprayed' on' coating that will last one insertion - and keep in mind the 'shiny' bit you see is 'only' the shield its the pins you want to be looking at!


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post #32 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Plasma5300 View Post
Not all Monster cables are overpriced. I got 2 really good 9 feet cables for 12 dollars each. Regular price was 75. Amazon has some good deals. The cables come with cable for life guarantee which they will upgrade my cable if my equipment is too powerful, and also lifetime warranty which will replace the cable if it stops working. Has all the bells and whistles. Gold plated, v grip connection, in wall certified, precise wiring , great shielding, metal connector plug casing. Feels very well built and looks great too.
We've had this discussion before. The fact that you bought a $75 list price cable for $12 is suspect at best.

A life-time guarantee that they will upgrade your cable if your system is too powerful? What does that mean?

In-wall certified? Nice "benefit" but if you're going to install your cables in-wall you'd be much better off using conduit and probably CAT-6 than burying a bare cable in the wall. I'd be more concerned about the HDMI certification than the in-wall cert. Did your cables come with a an HDMI certification for the length of cable you purchased?

Gold plating has already been covered

I guess $12 for a shiny, cool looking cable is not bad but the Monster name and their slick packaging doesn't mean squat.
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post #33 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 06:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Is everyone on this forum cranky all the time? It seems as if alot of members like proving someone wrong or "mine is better than yours",
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post #34 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 06:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
We've had this discussion before. The fact that you bought a $75 list price cable for $12 is suspect at best.

A life-time guarantee that they will upgrade your cable if your system is too powerful? What does that mean?

In-wall certified? Nice "benefit" but if you're going to install your cables in-wall you'd be much better off using conduit and probably CAT-6 than burying a bare cable in the wall. I'd be more concerned about the HDMI certification than the in-wall cert. Did your cables come with a an HDMI certification for the length of cable you purchased?

Gold plating has already been covered

I guess $12 for a shiny, cool looking cable is not bad but the Monster name and their slick packaging doesn't mean squat.
Cable for life states that in the future if the cable cannot handle the signal they(monster) will upgrade you to a cable that can handle the signal. Free. Cable came with a certificate of authenticity. Also some other certifications. Im taking it youve never purchased a monster cable. Im all for spending 12 bucks but I would never spend 75. No way no how. I have an issue with my tv and ps4 maybe a compatibility issue but the monster cable its less severe compared to my Mediabridge ultra, pluglug hd900, gamestop brand, and monoprice redmere, philips, not sure why. Maybe because its rated for speeds up to 14.3 and tge others are at 10.2.
Also at 9 feet Im not sure why I would need a certification for that length?
If you wwould like to share?
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post #35 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 09:31 PM
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A certified HDMI cable means that it has been tested and passed the Compliance Test Specifications for the current HDMI specifications. That is your only "guarantee" that the cable you bought will meet or exceed the HDMI specifications for that length of cable. For example, a mfr can offer a certificate of compliance for their 10' HDMI cable but that doesn't mean that their 6' or 15' HDMI cables have been tested and passed CTS. If a mfr states that their cables meet the CTS, then they should be able to provide you with certificates for any length of cable they sell, not just one. HDMI 1.4 has a maximum bandwidth of 10.2 Gbps and that's what they certification should be for. If your cable is certified by and HDMI.org approved testing group for 14.4 Gbps that's fine. But the current HDMI chipsets can only handle 10.2 so that "extra" bandwidth is meaningless at this point in time. Current certified High Speed HDMI cables will be able to meet HDMI 2.0 once the CTS testing results are released so there won't be any special HDMI 2.0 cables to purchase, only cables that have meet the CTS.

You don't have to get a certified HDMI cable if you don't want to. But as I said, it is the only way to guarantee that your cable is not going to be the weak link in your system should something not work correctly. And yes, I have used Monster cables a long time ago, paid a premium price for them, got educated, and never used them again. Any mfr can have a bad cable from time to time, certified or not, but given that you have gone thru a number of cables, including Redmere, leads me to believe that there is something else affecting your system, what ever the problem is, and not the HDMI cable.
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post #36 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Blindman0v0 View Post
Analogue you have to have good cables because of the bandwidth it needs to sound clear. HDMI is pure digital so its just the transfer of data,1's and 0's through the cable to be decrypted in the player. The only real issue is length.
I would caution users that construction quality and the quality of the connectors are also important. Beyond a certain limit, almost anything will work. I would always rather get genuine certified HDMI cables and not some cheap knockoff. But in that sense, I don't think a $200 or a $500 cable is going to necessarily out-perform a reasonable $35 cable.

If you ever walk through the manufacturer's rooms at CEDIA or CES, the cable manufacturers are openly telling dealers "we can help you make up for lost profits with hardware." Their basic line is, if you only made 5% on that TV sale, then start hawking our cables and you might be able to add another $100 or more to that deal by upselling the customer.

It's not necessarily bad -- dealers have used this trick for years -- but it is a bit of a scam. I think it's gotten harder to sell high-end cables in the world of digital, because most computer users understand there's almost no difference between a $500 USB cable and a $5 USB cable. I think you can make a good comparison to HDMI cable as well, though when you start pushing the limit over 50', you do need really good cables in order to make the connection work.

http://www.tested.com/tech/3329-the-...e-hdmi-cables/
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post #37 of 52 Old 07-20-2014, 09:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
A certified HDMI cable means that it has been tested and passed the Compliance Test Specifications for the current HDMI specifications. That is your only "guarantee" that the cable you bought will meet or exceed the HDMI specifications for that length of cable. For example, a mfr can offer a certificate of compliance for their 10' HDMI cable but that doesn't mean that their 6' or 15' HDMI cables have been tested and passed CTS. If a mfr states that their cables meet the CTS, then they should be able to provide you with certificates for any length of cable they sell, not just one. HDMI 1.4 has a maximum bandwidth of 10.2 Gbps and that's what they certification should be for. If your cable is certified by and HDMI.org approved testing group for 14.4 Gbps that's fine. But the current HDMI chipsets can only handle 10.2 so that "extra" bandwidth is meaningless at this point in time. Current certified High Speed HDMI cables will be able to meet HDMI 2.0 once the CTS testing results are released so there won't be any special HDMI 2.0 cables to purchase, only cables that have meet the CTS.

You don't have to get a certified HDMI cable if you don't want to. But as I said, it is the only way to guarantee that your cable is not going to be the weak link in your system should something not work correctly. And yes, I have used Monster cables a long time ago, paid a premium price for them, got educated, and never used them again. Any mfr can have a bad cable from time to time, certified or not, but given that you have gone thru a number of cables, including Redmere, leads me to believe that there is something else affecting your system, what ever the problem is, and not the HDMI cable.
Right. Ive realized along time ago that my problem wasnt the cable after trying so many different brands and lengths, but with the Monster cable I own which is the ISF certified for calibration seems to have less issues with my equipment. Im thinking that maybe I have some sort of interference or bad hdmi ports OR the Sony Ps4 does not like my samsung plasma or vise versa.
I have turn the ps4 on first then the tv or I get sound and video drops randomly. Then even if I turn the ps4 on first then the tv I get sparkles which I will turn the tv off then back on and everything is perfect. No sparkles steady connection. But with any other cable I own I will get random drops in the signal every 5-to 15 minutes where the screen goes black , then the 1080p/60 bar pops up in the top of the screen and reconnects, only lasts for a second or two even if I do all the turning off and on in order crap. Weird. Right.
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post #38 of 52 Old 08-13-2014, 10:43 PM - Thread Starter
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How about super thin cables without redmere or chips? How do they produce the same image quality as a thicker guage cable?
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post #39 of 52 Old 08-14-2014, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Plasma5300 View Post
How about super thin cables without redmere or chips? How do they produce the same image quality as a thicker guage cable?
Repeat after me...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...


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post #40 of 52 Old 08-14-2014, 08:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Repeat after me...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...'It's all just ones and zeros'...
Lmao!
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post #41 of 52 Old 08-14-2014, 08:35 PM - Thread Starter
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What about deep color? Some cable manufacturers state 16bit color or 48bit color? Now isnt it 16 bit per color which adds up to 48?
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post #42 of 52 Old 08-14-2014, 09:48 PM
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Just buy a certified HDMI cable and you're covered for all HDMI 1.4/2.0 protocols, whether they are implemented in consumer devices or not. Cable mfrs will make all kinds of marketing claims to get you to buy their probably overpriced cables. You're way over-thinking this. Passive cables can be certified for up to 25'. Active cables (Redmere) can go much longer and maintain the HDMI protocols. Just buy a cable that is certified for the length you want and don't worry about it.
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post #43 of 52 Old 08-14-2014, 10:06 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Just buy a certified HDMI cable and you're covered for all HDMI 1.4/2.0 protocols, whether they are implemented in consumer devices or not. Cable mfrs will make all kinds of marketing claims to get you to buy their probably overpriced cables. You're way over-thinking this. Passive cables can be certified for up to 25'. Active cables (Redmere) can go much longer and maintain the HDMI protocols. Just buy a cable that is certified for the length you want and don't worry about it.
I get it. Just plug in my cable if it works then im getting everything possible. If it doesnt work ill definitely know. Ive heard alot of talk about monoprice. Everybody seems to love it. But no need for me to purchase one if my cable is working.
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post #44 of 52 Old 08-14-2014, 10:46 PM
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HDMI specs have a standard for certification. If I remember correctly from a few years ago that minimal standard means that there should be enough bits transfered before the signal is degraded. An oscilloscope is typically used where the signal is supposed to clear the "eye" on the screen of the testing equipment. For some reason there have been obvious differences between various cables of the same length when they are tested with oscilloscopes when they're supposed to be the same. How this translates into quality I'm not sure but I do recall information posted at the HDMI org website years ago stating that the construction and quality of the conductor used can make a difference in signal quality.
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post #45 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 08:51 AM
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I get it. Just plug in my cable if it works then im getting everything possible. If it doesnt work ill definitely know. Ive heard alot of talk about monoprice. Everybody seems to love it. But no need for me to purchase one if my cable is working.
Monoprice, Blue Jeans, MediaBridge, to name a few, all make good, reliable cables. If your lengths are short, say under 6', you can probably get away with a smaller gauge cable if you want flexibility and less strain on the input end. I would make sure that whatever you purchase you purchase from a major retailer and not off of eBay or elsewhere.
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post #46 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 08:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Monoprice, Blue Jeans, MediaBridge, to name a few, all make good, reliable cables. If your lengths are short, say under 6', you can probably get away with a smaller gauge cable if you want flexibility and less strain on the input end. I would make sure that whatever you purchase you purchase from a major retailer and not off of eBay or elsewhere.
I purchased off amazon. Its a sony . So its from a reputable brand. Its only 3 feet. Super thin. About as thin as a micro usb cable. It works so im guessing im fine 😏
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post #47 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 08:59 AM
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HDMI specs have a standard for certification. If I remember correctly from a few years ago that minimal standard means that there should be enough bits transfered before the signal is degraded. An oscilloscope is typically used where the signal is supposed to clear the "eye" on the screen of the testing equipment. For some reason there have been obvious differences between various cables of the same length when they are tested with oscilloscopes when they're supposed to be the same. How this translates into quality I'm not sure but I do recall information posted at the HDMI org website years ago stating that the construction and quality of the conductor used can make a difference in signal quality.
If the certified testing group is recognized by HDMI.org, then the testing methodology is consistent so the certification received is valid as meeting all requirements for High Speed HDMI regardless of materials used in the cable construction. The quality of materials used can be shown via oscilloscopes and other instrumentation but the end result is the same, the cable either meets or does not meet the HDMI standard. Visually, there is no discernible difference between the materials used if the cable is certified.
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post #48 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 09:00 AM - Thread Starter
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super thin!

I meant walmart. Not amazon. See how super thin the cable is? Haha
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post #49 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 09:01 AM
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I purchased off amazon. Its a sony . So its from a reputable brand. Its only 3 feet. Super thin. About as thin as a micro usb cable. It works so im guessing im fine
Amazon is reliable but be careful that the cable is not being sold thru Amazon by a third party. I have seen "branded" cables sold thru Amazon's partners that were questionable. You'll more than likely be fine so just file that information away for future reference if need be.

Walmart? Personally I wouldn't buy anything from Walmart. But if it works, you're fine.
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post #50 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 09:06 AM - Thread Starter
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If the certified testing group is recognized by HDMI.org, then the testing methodology is consistent so the certification received is valid as meeting all requirements for High Speed HDMI regardless of materials used in the cable construction. The quality of materials used can be shown via oscilloscopes and other instrumentation but the end result is the same, the cable either meets or does not meet the HDMI standard. Visually, there is no discernible difference between the materials used if the cable is certified.
How would I know if this cable is certified?
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post #51 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Blindman0v0
...Gold connectors help a little, there's a reason why NASA uses them....



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Very little, unless both connectors are gold plated. In fact if one is Tin plated and the other Gold you could have problems from dissimilar metals. That NASA uses them is irrelevant to the discussion.

Agreed... they are more than likely using gold for oxidation reasons.
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post #52 of 52 Old 08-15-2014, 10:04 AM
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How would I know if this cable is certified?
Ask for the certification, or see if there is one online that you can review and/or download. Just be careful that if you do get the certification that it is for the length of cable you purchased. Just because a certificate is available for a 10' cable doesn't necessarily mean that the same cable in a shorter length is also certified. Again, if you buy directly from a reputable dealer/mfr you probably won't have any problems. I've seen cables that don't come with a certificate of compliance function as well as ones that did.
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