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post #1 of 22 Old 06-21-2014, 04:43 PM - Thread Starter
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What are all the hdmi port meanings please.

So I am in the middle of buying a new telly (lg 49ub850v) but I am confused as to what all the hdmi connectors are on the telly.

I believe there is
1 x hdmi (hdcp 2.2)
1 x hdmi (arc)
1 x hdmi (10 bit)
1 x hdmi (mhl)

On lgs' site it says it has.
1 x hdmi 2.0
3 x hdmi 1.4

Firstly what are all these and just what do they do as I would assume they have different features.
Secondly do I need 1.4 and 2.0 cables or can I use my current high speed 1.3 cables? Or will I lose quality and 3d features via using an older cable?

Any help in this would be appreciated I am upgrading from a telly I bought about 5 years ago (lg42300) which just had 3 hdmi ports.

I apologise if this has being asked but couldn't see it.
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post #2 of 22 Old 06-21-2014, 05:42 PM
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As far as HDMI cables go, there is no such thing as an HDMI 1.3 or 1.4 cable. The cable number designation was supposed to have been dropped by the mfrs sometime ago because it was too confusing and meant little. The number reflects the HDMI protocol (hardware) version which basically has nothing to do with the cable. Any, certified high speed HDMI cable will do for all of the HDMI hardware version, 2.0, 1.4, 1.3, etc.

ARC is Audio Return Channel and that is the HDMI port you want to use if your receiver is ARC capable. Both devices have to be ARC capable for you to send audio bi-directionally. It basically eliminates the need to use an optical cable if you are trying to get audio from either the built-in ATSC tuner or your SmartApps. The audio on ARC is limited to discrete 5.1 just like an optical cable is.

HDCP 2.2 is the new copy protection algorithm and is part of the HDMI 2.0 protocol. So the HDMI input that is labeled is for that.

MHL is Mobile High Definition Link and allows you to connect and mirror your smartphone or tablet to your tv.

Keep in mind that to be able to take full advantage of HDMI 2.0, any device connected to that input also has to be HDMI 2.0 capable, and there are very few devices (blu-ray players, receivers, etc) available that have the current HDMI 2.0 chipsets, but they are coming. Otherwise, what ever you connect to that input will default back to the HDMI 1.4 protocols.

10-bit refers to the panel color depth and is also part of the new HDMI 2.0 protocols.
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post #3 of 22 Old 06-21-2014, 06:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turtletom100 View Post
So I am in the middle of buying a new telly (lg 49ub850v) but I am confused as to what all the hdmi connectors are on the telly.

I believe there is
1 x hdmi (hdcp 2.2)
1 x hdmi (arc)
1 x hdmi (10 bit)
1 x hdmi (mhl)

On lgs' site it says it has.
1 x hdmi 2.0
3 x hdmi 1.4

Firstly what are all these and just what do they do as I would assume they have different features.
Secondly do I need 1.4 and 2.0 cables or can I use my current high speed 1.3 cables? Or will I lose quality and 3d features via using an older cable?

Any help in this would be appreciated I am upgrading from a telly I bought about 5 years ago (lg42300) which just had 3 hdmi ports.

I apologise if this has being asked but couldn't see it.
The first thing you should always do is Google your question, and check Wikipedia, as much of your answers are there:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDMI

HDMI 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.4a, and 2.0 are different versions of HDMI. Mostly they relate to speed and the features which may be supported by that version. Manufacturers are NOT supposed to talk about what version of HDMI they have, but what features are supported by the HDMI connection.

The other stuff is all feature based. MHL = Mobile High-Definition Link, HDCP 2.2 - High Bandwidth Content Protection support - version 2.2, ARC = Audio Return Channel support, 10-bit = 10-bit color support (more colors, greater quality).

There are all sorts of other terms, but most of these are readily available to lookup in detail via Google.

Oh, and your existing 'high speed' cable should work fine. The only way to know 100% is to test it out, but typically this is the case. I've used a 10 year old DVI cable with a new Samsung TV with 3D, and it worked great using frame packed 1080p 3D content.

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post #4 of 22 Old 06-21-2014, 06:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
As far as HDMI cables go, there is no such thing as an HDMI 1.3 or 1.4 cable. The cable number designation was supposed to have been dropped by the mfrs sometime ago because it was too confusing and meant little. The number reflects the HDMI protocol (hardware) version which basically has nothing to do with the cable. Any, certified high speed HDMI cable will do for all of the HDMI hardware version, 2.0, 1.4, 1.3, etc.

ARC is Audio Return Channel and that is the HDMI port you want to use if your receiver is ARC capable. Both devices have to be ARC capable for you to send audio bi-directionally. It basically eliminates the need to use an optical cable if you are trying to get audio from either the built-in ATSC tuner or your SmartApps. The audio on ARC is limited to discrete 5.1 just like an optical cable is.

HDCP 2.2 is the new copy protection algorithm and is part of the HDMI 2.0 protocol. So the HDMI input that is labeled is for that.

MHL is Mobile High Definition Link and allows you to connect and mirror your smartphone or tablet to your tv.

Keep in mind that to be able to take full advantage of HDMI 2.0, any device connected to that input also has to be HDMI 2.0 capable, and there are very few devices (blu-ray players, receivers, etc) available that have the current HDMI 2.0 chipsets, but they are coming. Otherwise, what ever you connect to that input will default back to the HDMI 1.4 protocols.

10-bit refers to the panel color depth and is also part of the new HDMI 2.0 protocols.

Thankyou for the detailed reply much appreciated. So basically where I don't have any arc devices that will just be used as a standard hdmi port, and I haven't got any hdmi 2.0 devices either (though I am currently looking at 4k blu ray players, so might end up with one depending on price) but any device I use for example sky or 3d bluray player will work fine in any of the ports?

Also with regards to the mhl I thought this is what it was as I currently have a mhl cable for my phone the galaxy s4 which is a hdmi to the charging point cable.

Also another question have i got to use any specific hdmi ports for certain devices (bearing in mind I don't have 2.0 or arc devices) only reason I ask this is because someone I know has just bought the samsung 55 inch 4k telly (can't remember model all I know is it is this years model) and whilst setting it up he had to remove the hdmi/hdmis because the screen wouldn't load.
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post #5 of 22 Old 06-21-2014, 06:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Also I see certified is underlined. How do I know if they are certified as I thought seeing as I am getting a new telly which is 4k I may as well change my hdmi cables at the moment I'm using 1.3 high speed, just black cable pretty thin (i have just read numbers mean nothing and ordered before I had read this)

But have ordered a couple of these off eBay 380795934801 the premium gold ones but it doesn't state they are certified says they are high speed.
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post #6 of 22 Old 06-21-2014, 07:46 PM
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AV_Integrated is correct in that Google is your friend. If you don't understand what you find, then certainly come here, but asking first is not an egregious error. Just keep that in mind for next time. Anyway......

A certified HDMI cable should be advertised as such and quite often either comes with the certificate or is available for download online. The certification should be for the length of cable you are buying. Some careful marketing will say their cables are certified but they don't specifically indicate that your length has been certified. Certified just means that the cable has been tested and meets all of the specifications that are part of the current HDMI protocols.

Don't fall for all the bells and whistles that are listed for cables like gold plated, double insulated, etc etc etc. The tech specs they list may be impressive but you won't see any difference in video/audio. Monoprice, Media Bridge, Blue Jeans, etc all make solid, reliable cables.

Keep in mind that current high speed HDMI cables are certified for lengths up to 25'. So if your cable run is longer than that, you need to take that into consideration. You can use a thicker gauge wire up to a point but the cable will be stiff. Redmere technology is cool in that it is an active, much thinner cable, but there are caveats with that as well.

Any HDMI device can be connected to any HDMI input. If the input only supports HDMI 1.3 or 1.4 protocols that's ok because they are backwards compatible.

4k is cool is but I think to be able to take full advantage of it, HDMI 2.0 will be needed for all devices connected to the tv. Up-converting works very well so buying a 4k tv is not a bad investment but the best is yet to come. Streaming is a whole different matter.
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post #7 of 22 Old 06-22-2014, 03:24 AM - Thread Starter
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Cheers otto Pylot, I did Google it but in wiki it is so confusing all the variants and numbers on there I am a bit of a beginner to this, a 24 year old who just wants a half descent setup.

But having someone like yourself explain is definately a massive help.

With regards to the cable I purchased from eBay I will ask the seller if it is certified. I was aware about the missing selling and there have been a couple programs on the telly recently explaining the dales techniques and differences (well in some cases no difference) between a £60 cable from say currys to a £3 cable on ebay.

I will go and look now for the monoprice, blue jeans and media bridge and will invest in a couple next pay day

With regards to buying all 2.0 hdmi leads I would only be able to use one 2.0 unless I can buy a splitter (i would assume the splitter would need to be hdmi 2.0 aswell)
And as it stands I don't think my sky+ HD nox supports hdmi 2.0 and my xbox 360 doesn't either. As it stands my current blu ray player doesn't either (but will be investing very soon in a 4k player, so hopefully that will)

As it stands it would t make a difference would it if the device doesn't support 2.0 or am I wrong?

Thanks again for the advice much appreciated.
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post #8 of 22 Old 06-22-2014, 03:37 AM - Thread Starter
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Also when I was looking come across a crmple 28 awg 1.4 hdmi cable.

It is a bit more expensive but was wondering if you have had any exocrine with these I believe these are certified.
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post #9 of 22 Old 06-22-2014, 09:25 AM
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You should be able to get a copy of the actual certification certificate. If not, caveat emptor. Buying off of eBay, regardless of how honest the seller sounds should always be taken with a grain of salt. Personally, I stick to major retailers with solid customer support and written return policies. Companies like Monster charge very high prices for their cables with all sorts of claims but it basically comes down to "1s" and "0's". If you get video and audio without popping (audio) or sparkling (video), then that's about the best you are going to get. A $5 cable can perform, and quite often does, as well as a $50 cable.

I'm not sure what you mean my HDMI 2.0 leads. There is no such thing. HDMI is a hardware spec, not a cable or connector spec. A certified high speed HDMI cable can and will support HDMI 2.0 hardware specs and below (1.4b, 1.3a, etc). All of your devices have to have the HDMI 2.0 chipsets in order to be able to transmit the higher bandwidth necessary for the new specs. Those chipsets are not quite available yet. You can't magically connect a 1.4 hardware to a 2.0 extender, for example, and expect to get the 2.0 bandwidth. It doesn't work that way. That's why new tv's today that are being advertised as having HDMI 2.0 are a little bit ahead of the game as there are no devices (with the exception of a few brand new receivers and blu-ray players) that have the 2.0 chipsets. And out of those, it is unclear at this point in time just how much of the HDMI 2.0 protocols those chipsets have. STB's and game consoles will probably be the last to have the new chipsets when available. Some mfrs are advertising that their devices are "HDMI 2.0 Capable" or can be upgraded with a firmware/software update. Sony does that now but what the upgrade actually comprises is what some call HDMI 2.0 Lite. It's just a bandwidth nudge to be able to play some 4k video, which is actually at the upper limit of the HDMI 1.4 spec. Other mfrs, like LG, are saying that some of their newer tv's will be upgradeable with a board swap. Samsung is selling their new tv/monitors with an external box (One Connect) that is supposed to have all the latest bells and whistles but they are having some real issues with confusing firmware versions/updates, and other issues.

You can't harm anything by connecting a 1.4 device to a 2.0 input. You will just default back to the 1.4 spec but remember, all of your devices in that particular chain have to be able to support HDMI 2.0 and as it stands now, not all devices that are supposed to be HDMI 2.0 compatible support the same set of protocols, at least not yet.

If you need a new 4k tv today, then by all means get one. You really can't go wrong. But keep in mind that the fully compatible (or at least the features that are most important and realistic) HDMI 2.0 chipsets are just starting to become available (and the tv panels that can support the higher resolutions, color depth, etc) and then of course there is source material. It will be a long time, IMO, before cable/sat will be transmitting on a regular basis true 4k and the same holds true for blu-ray (or red-ray what ever the new term will be) movies. Games will probably more predominant initially because they don't have to follow the same video standards that movies do (REC.709 for example).

Thinner gauge wire is fine if you want the flexibility and not so much strain on the input end. If your runs are under 10', then you can probably get away with a thinner wire and sill be able to enjoy 3D or what ever you want. A thicker gauge wire can extend your run over the 25' limit but the wire will be stiffer and more difficult to work with, and there is also the possible extra strain on the input end. Redmere cables are active cables in that they have a little chipset in the end that connects to the tv so they draw a little power from the tv. The advantage is that the cables are really thin and flexible with absolutely no strain at all on the connector end. They are uni-directional cables but you can't harm anything by connecting them backwards. You just won't get a signal. You can run them at lengths much longer than 25' without any issues at all. The downside is that because there is a little chipset in the sink end, they can fail over time like any electronic device. But if you have easy access to the cables, you just replace them. They are a little more expensive but not unreasonably so. For runs under 10' or so, they are probably an overkill but that's up to you. I use Redmere only because I wanted the flexibility with no strain on the inputs. My cable access is easy so if I do have to replace them it's not a big deal.

Last edited by Otto Pylot; 06-22-2014 at 09:35 AM.
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post #10 of 22 Old 06-22-2014, 07:55 PM
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How long are your cables?

Why are you spending money to replace them?

If you have certified HDMI cables, they should work just fine for all your equipment.

Personally, I recommend that you use the thinnest cables you can get which are high-speed rated for the distance you are using them at as they will produce the least amount of strain on the connections, but I certainly wouldn't change out a working cable for a new one just because.

It's your money on that one though.

If possible, provide links to the exact products you are looking at or purchasing (if you can).

This product you mentioned:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/380795934801...801%26_rdc%3D1

I wouldn't buy at all until I had tested my old cables. They add some 'bling' to your setup, but in my world, I hide every cable I possibly can so nobody can see a cable at all. Once again, your choice and your money.

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post #11 of 22 Old 06-23-2014, 02:52 AM
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Turtletom100

Put your Credit Card away and keep it locked away – ‘the bigger numbers is better’ marketing guys must love you and your Card J

UHD ‘4K’ TV – it is very early days to be jumping into the UHDTV market with lots of standards, specifications and support still to be fully ironed out, personally I’d be hanging on for another year to see next year’s model line-up has to offer if I’m expecting to keep my New TV for another 5+ years!

HDMI cables – zero requirement for you to replace any of your current cables.

4K Blu-ray player – no such thing, though you can purchase a Blu-ray Player which will ‘up convert’ the 1080p of the Blu-ray disc to 2160pto match the resolution of your ‘New’ UHD (2160p) TV, then again if you plug any Blu-ray Player Outputting 1800p into an UHD TV the TV will up-convert the signal for you so no real need for a New BD Player.

Also another question have i got to use any specific hdmi ports for certain devices’ – as per previous advice by Otto and AV_I look for any special ‘Features’ your Source has to offer and match them up with the relevant Ports on the TV (assuming it supports those features).

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post #12 of 22 Old 06-24-2014, 02:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Joe Fernand View Post
Turtletom100

Put your Credit Card away and keep it locked away – ‘the bigger numbers is better’ marketing guys must love you and your Card J

UHD ‘4K’ TV – it is very early days to be jumping into the UHDTV market with lots of standards, specifications and support still to be fully ironed out, personally I’d be hanging on for another year to see next year’s model line-up has to offer if I’m expecting to keep my New TV for another 5+ years!

HDMI cables – zero requirement for you to replace any of your current cables.

4K Blu-ray player – no such thing, though you can purchase a Blu-ray Player which will ‘up convert’ the 1080p of the Blu-ray disc to 2160pto match the resolution of your ‘New’ UHD (2160p) TV, then again if you plug any Blu-ray Player Outputting 1800p into an UHD TV the TV will up-convert the signal for you so no real need for a New BD Player.

Also another question have i got to use any specific hdmi ports for certain devices’ – as per previous advice by Otto and AV_I look for any special ‘Features’ your Source has to offer and match them up with the relevant Ports on the TV (assuming it supports those features).

Joe
Thanks for the reply to both you guys. I am in middle of purchasing the lg49ub850v which is a 4k 49 inch telly only reason being is because I need to replace my bedroom telly so I will be moving my current front room telly in to the bedroom. I will update it again next year if there is better out there within certain price ranges that's not a problem. And I have come across a lgbp740 which claims to be a 4k blu ray player (i am in no rush because as you say the telly will upscale) and with regards to cable I have bought it and will jot be using it as when it is delivered there is no certificate the only reason I was going to change them is because I have used the same cables for the past 3/4 years and again my cables are all tucked away nicely so never changed them I believe they are 1.3 so not sure if this would work with 3d that was the main reason to change atleast 1 especially whilst I would have access as changing telly of cantilever bracket.

Like I say I'm new to all this young 24 year old lad who is naive to a certain extent so this help is really helpful.
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post #13 of 22 Old 06-24-2014, 05:36 PM
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I don't remember off the top of my head the differences between 1.3 and 1.4 as far as bandwidth goes. Just remember if the cables are labeled as 1.3 they are old just by vitrue of the fact that cables are not supposed to be labeled with the HDMI hardware version since 2011 (?). You can go to the HDMI.org website and get the specs. Even if your devices have HDMI 2.0 inputs but your cables can't handle the bandwidth you may have issues, especially with 3D. If your cables are high speed, there shouldn't be any issues. Maybe Joe or AV can be more specific. By tucked away, do you mean your cables are installed in the wall?
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post #14 of 22 Old 06-24-2014, 05:52 PM - Thread Starter
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The cable I bought of eBay don't say what it is on the cable or the packaging so It is just what he has said on the listing and I believe mine are 1.3 or 1.4 I pretty sure they are high speed though and my cables are not tucked away as in buried but where I have a 5.1 sound system, sky, bluray player, xbox 360, 😧😨 nintendo wii and my pc all connected it's a pain in the backside to do anything with cables. Where my telly is on a cantilever stand the cables go behind all I an describe it as is a rectangle with the back cut off to allow cables to sit in then on the back of the telly I have a cable tidy strap where most also go through.
The telly should be here tommorow so will have a look at what the hdmi cables are when I swap the telly. Thanks again guys.
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post #15 of 22 Old 06-24-2014, 08:22 PM
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If your cables are not installed in the wall then you can replace them if need be. I understand that it would be a hassle but it may be worth it. I'd just purchase certified high speed HDMI cables from Monoprice for the lengths you need and be done with it. An extra expense for sure but at least you'd know for sure that any video issues you may encounter are not cable related because you have all new certified high speed cables. eBay is not the best place to purchase cables because they can be labeled as anything and made by anybody, regardless of what the packaging says. Video standards are becoming more exacting so it pays to buy cables from reputable dealers who have good customer support and return policies. Now is not the time to go cheap if you can.
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post #16 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 04:47 AM - Thread Starter
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If your cables are not installed in the wall then you can replace them if need be. I understand that it would be a hassle but it may be worth it. I'd just purchase certified high speed HDMI cables from Monoprice for the lengths you need and be done with it. An extra expense for sure but at least you'd know for sure that any video issues you may encounter are not cable related because you have all new certified high speed cables. eBay is not the best place to purchase cables because they can be labeled as anything and made by anybody, regardless of what the packaging says. Video standards are becoming more exacting so it pays to buy cables from reputable dealers who have good customer support and return policies. Now is not the time to go cheap if you can.
Thanks Otto Pylot, I am going to have a look on there site now and have lg purchase 4 cables atleast like you say it's down then and will now it's not the cables to blame if anything happens. To be fair I should be alright but is better to be safe than sorry.

Thanks to both you guys for all the help it has being really appreciated.
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post #17 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 04:53 AM - Thread Starter
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I have looked on monoprice.com and can see this is a american based I lice in the uk so have an issue there hut have found on amazon a high speed monoprice cable but have a new issue what is redmere.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B00A...ref=mp_s_a_1_3

That is a slim cable but that will be fine won't it?
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post #18 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 05:24 AM
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Hi turtletom100

HDMI cables – HDMI.org banned the use of Version numbers on New cables and kit in any marketing from Jan 2012.

HDMI cables – for 3D you are advised to go with a High Speed cable, though in all probability your existing cables (no matter the markings/or lack of) will cater for 3D.

http://www.hdmi.org/consumer/finding_right_cable.aspx

Installed – as otto says I’d only ‘upgrade’ if you hit a problem and or your are installing cables which could be tricky to replace.

RedMere – are an Irish technology Co. who license a chip set which can be embedded in the connector hood of an HDMI cable, the Chip ‘borrows/steals’voltage from the device the cable is connected to to power active circuitry on the chip. This potentially allows you to certify your cable as High Speed at length w here a passive cable will fail the test. RedMere license its Tech to various cable assembly manufacturers.

UK – I am UK based, if you need a hand sourcing cables drop me a note and I’ll point you in the right direction.

Joe
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Hi turtletom100

HDMI cables – HDMI.org banned the use of Version numbers on New cables and kit in any marketing from Jan 2012.

HDMI cables – for 3D you are advised to go with a High Speed cable, though in all probability your existing cables (no matter the markings/or lack of) will cater for 3D.

http://www.hdmi.org/consumer/finding_right_cable.aspx

Installed – as otto says I’d only ‘upgrade’ if you hit a problem and or your are installing cables which could be tricky to replace.

RedMere – are an Irish technology Co. who license a chip set which can be embedded in the connector hood of an HDMI cable, the Chip ‘borrows/steals’voltage from the device the cable is connected to to power active circuitry on the chip. This potentially allows you to certify your cable as High Speed at length w here a passive cable will fail the test. RedMere license its Tech to various cable assembly manufacturers.

UK – I am UK based, if you need a hand sourcing cables drop me a note and I’ll point you in the right direction.

Joe
Thank you for your reply joe.
I am interested in changing my cables not because they don't work but because I am going to be receiving the new telly tommorow hopefully and whilst I am changing it before I put all the cables back and tidy them up I would prefer to get newer ones.

Is redmere worth the extra? And where and what cables would you advise purchasing?
I have found monoprice on amazon.co.uk like in the previous link.

Thanks again
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post #20 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 09:15 AM
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I think I may have mentioned this but Redmere's real advantage, besides being thin, is that they are active cables (embedded chipsets as Joe indicated) so you can run them at lengths longer than 25' and still maintain the integrity needed for high speed. For shorter runs, they are probably an overkill. The only reason I use them is for the flexibility and the fact that I can easily get to my cables (which are very neatly tucked away behind the media console) if I need to replace them. Because they have the chipset, they can fail like any other electronic device even tho mine have been working flawlessly for over a year now. Follow Joe's advice and you can't go wrong.
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post #21 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 10:12 AM
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'before I put all the cables back and tidy them up' - be careful with how you 'tidy' HDMI cables, too heavy handed with cable ties and you can cause problems.

As otto says the RedMere chip allows you to go long and utilse skinny/flexible cable stock - where you dont need to go long you can still use skinny/flexible cable stock but avoid the active chip set.

We supply UKHDMI in Oxford with our Octava HDMI gear and they have a huge (often confusing!) range of HDMI cables inc. these two options:

http://ukhdmi.com/mackuna_flex_cable/

http://ukhdmi.com/ivuna_slim_flex_cable/

As per pretty much every cable vendor ignore all the guff re 1.4/1.3 etc - cables up to 8m will be High Speed and anything over 8m (non-active) will be Standard Speed.

Joe

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post #22 of 22 Old 06-26-2014, 07:17 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Fernand View Post
'before I put all the cables back and tidy them up' - be careful with how you 'tidy' HDMI cables, too heavy handed with cable ties and you can cause problems.

As otto says the RedMere chip allows you to go long and utilse skinny/flexible cable stock - where you dont need to go long you can still use skinny/flexible cable stock but avoid the active chip set.

We supply UKHDMI in Oxford with our Octava HDMI gear and they have a huge (often confusing!) range of HDMI cables inc. these two options:

http://ukhdmi.com/mackuna_flex_cable/

http://ukhdmi.com/ivuna_slim_flex_cable/

As per pretty much every cable vendor ignore all the guff re 1.4/1.3 etc - cables up to 8m will be High Speed and anything over 8m (non-active) will be Standard Speed.

Joe
Cheers for the reply guys and I will purchasing some of them cables thankyou very much for your patience and time 20th myself.
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