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post #1 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 09:45 AM - Thread Starter
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Question HDMI 2.0, 2.0a, 2.0b... cables?

Hello all,

(Note - sorry links are not functional; first time poster, so rules prohibit I post any links or images before post 6.)

Let me preface this by saying thank you. Thank you for being, and thank you for the amazing support, stories and advice you provide on this forum. For Tech junkies (novices) like me, I can read the specs, and understand them to a certain extent, but you all give context and better references than the convoluted jargon used on product websites.

As such, I researched. And researched, and researched. Looking into my first HDTV since 2009. After a long selection process, I narrowed it all down, canceled out the Sony, the Vizio and the LG (non-OLED... if I had OLED money, I wouldn't worry so much) and got a 65KS8000, with a 790 for sound and an XB1S for the developing UHD BR scene. Unfortunately, my wife is a bit of a worrywart when it comes to big-spending online. (If I could have used Crutchfield or B&H on this, again, different conversation)

So I'm forced to buy in person at Best Buy. I cut in and move like a raptor, sights trained on my prey and start ordering components by the SKUs I looked up online. No need to talk out options, I have done my homework. Funny enough how many people point out how these BB salesmen try to push the Sony's, I was nearly offended at how they were ramming the 850 and 940 down my throat.

I get to the end of it all and the clerk asks me what HDMI cables I want. Having thought I did all the research on what I wanted, I knew I would hook this all up myself, so I told him I was ordering some that I had found on Amazon.

I didn't want to get accosted into another Monster purchase, as I was 7 years ago, only to read all my education meant nothing, and the mean man at Best Buy made me quite the fool that day.

I should add, I cave when cornered.

And so, this new and improved meanie cornered me, and sold me on the very different but equally expensive, super-sounding, silver-tipped AudioQuest Chocolate cables.

A little uneasy, I went home, angry because I for sure got taken again on cables I could have got for 1/5th the price online, but nonetheless happy because I knew the 4k HDR goodies that awaited me. (Still waiting, delivery expected tomorrow)

BUT, but, BUT, I get home and look at all the items I was able to bring home in the car, and get to the HDMI boxes only to see they are essentially 1.4 cables. They have all the right wording on there - 18Gbps, 4K, 3D support, 4K@60Hz, ARC, 2.5% silver-tipped for better audio, less distortion, etc.

Darned thing is, it never specifies what quality cable it is certified to be. It says "can work with HDMI 2.0" products to deliver 4K picture, but I also told the BB guy I'm looking at 2.0a capable wiring as well for HDR-support. (And 2.0b if you got it, sure... I'd love me some dynamic HDR metadata) And he handed me this box.

My question after all this (truly, god bless you heroes, you Cadillacs of men, if you reply to my needlessly long post) is, what's the difference? Not functionally, because I got that from all the literature. But, are there different cables? Because on the one hand, a majority of posts say no, the same data is carried over new expanded channels in 1.4 cables. But then I read about the exclusive capabilities of 2.0 and 2.0a when plugging in only 1.4-capable wires into 2.0 supported televisions, etc.

Are there different wires? Are the AQ Chocolates I got no good for me and my HDR-dreams? Are the Amazon ones I chose any better? Are 2.0/2.0a cables and of you find good, or worthy of recommending?

I very much appreciate your time and look forward to becoming a more engaged member who doesn't mooch as much.

Thanks much,
JPDL
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post #2 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 10:55 AM
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There is no such thing as an HDMI 2.0 cable. The number is the HDMI hardware spec, not the cable spec. Cable mfrs word their cable descriptions very carefully to a point that I think is borderline deceptive and then charge you a premium price. Monster and AudioQuest are masters at that.

The current passive, high speed HDMI cables should be able to meet the current HDMI 2.0a hardware spec. There are a lots of caveats to that though. Basically, video performance (4k, HDR, etc.) has far outpaced cable technology. It's one thing to lay a cable out in a straight line in a QC setting and claim that the 40' cable meets all HDMI 2.0a hardware specs, and then take the same cable and install it in a real world setting like your home, with your equipment, installation, etc and have the cable meet those performance expectations reliably. Shorter runs, say under about 25' should be ok but even then that's not a guarantee. Oxygen-free copper, gold plated, yadda yadda yadda is all market speak. Sure, if you monitor cables mfrd like that on sophisticated test equipment, you will see a difference in response but for the most part, that response is not perceptible to the human eyes and ears. So what you're paying for is a "superior in theory" cable, but can you tell the difference between that cable and another well made cable at a third to half the price? No.

As far as active cables go, there is nothing magical about them other than they can carry the signal at longer distances without any loss. They do that by having a chipset in the sink end (tv side) that draws a little power from the sink for error correction, timing, etc to propagate the signal for a longer distance. But even then, that has some distance limitations as well as the chipsets used.

1080p doesn't seem to be much of a problem and neither does 4k. But when you start looking at HDR (Dolby Vision, HDR10), and the 18Gbps bandwidth requirement, you start running into problems. Some cables work, some cables don't. Some folks have even gone to fiber optic cables only to find the same problems, some work, some don't.

Cables that are properly and truly certified should be what we look for. But we've seen that even some of those will have distance issues as well. A properly and truly certified cable (BJC, DPL Labs, or by an ATC) should come with a counterfeit proof label of authenticity, regardless of what the mfr says. One should be able to look up the certificate of compliance and see what the cable was actually certified for. Again, that's not a 100% guarantee that the cable will meet your expectations given your equipment and setup.

Future-proofing is the big buzzword now. The only way that one can future proof their cable installation is to use a 1.5" - 2.0" conduit, especially if you have a long run that is installed in-wall. Using a conduit will make swapping out/repairing/upgrading cable much easier than trying to fish a new cable down the wall. Some are even installing solid core CAT-6a (non-CCS and not CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) for future use, along with a pull-string in case actively terminating the in-wall cable run with something like HDBT will be necessary for the future. If I had a run longer than 25', and I wanted to install it in-wall, I'd think twice about installing an HDMI cable and look into other methods of connectivity. Otherwise, I'd just have to expect that I'll be changing out that cable probably a lot sooner than later.

For runs under about 15' for 4k, 4:4:4 @60Hz, a well made passive cable with a 24AWG wire should work. It is thicker so you will lose flexibility with possible increased strain on the HDMI inputs. Longer than that, it's a crap shoot. An active cable may allow you to push that longer but you'll have to experiment (trial and error) so find one that will work for you. The downside of active cables is that the chipset may fail overtime (like any other electronic device), or the newest video standards may require an updated Redemere chipset. In which case you'd need to replace the cable.

It's a mess. So take a deep breath, read the specs carefully, and make sure you understand completely the return policies and time frame. What ever you purchase, I'd lay it out on the floor and really test the "stuff" out of it before final installation. And be mindful of bend radius.

And one more thing..... it's helpful that all of your HDMI connected devices have the same version or build of HDMI/HDCP chipsets. Otherwise, your chain will operate at the common HDMI protocols. In other words, if your blu-ray player has current HDMI 2.0a chipsets but your tv only has HDMI 1.4 chipsets, you will only be able to take advantage of what HDMI 1.4 can handle. The cable is just the data pipe, the deciding factor is the HDMI chipsets at the sink and source end.
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post #3 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 11:01 AM
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I too am trying to get new HDMI cables right now but mostly within 6Ft long but can't decide whether to get 2.0 ones or 2.0a as I want to future-proof my setup. I do have an HDR capable 4k tv but am not sending any HDR data to it as of YET, only streaming via amazon and such. Though, at some point I will buy a UHD player and then I'll be needing that HDR pushing awesome HDMI cables and after reading a whole lot of stuff, still am confused whether I should get 2.0a cables or not and if 2.0 or even 1.4 will be fine. Thanks.

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Main Living Room: Samsung 65 KS9800 + Audio: Onkyo HT-S6300 7.1 + Sony UBP-X800 + PS4
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post #4 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by b0rnarian View Post
I too am trying to get new HDMI cables right now but mostly within 6Ft long but can't decide whether to get 2.0 ones or 2.0a as I want to future-proof my setup. I do have an HDR capable 4k tv but am not sending any HDR data to it as of YET, only streaming via amazon and such. Though, at some point I will buy a UHD player and then I'll be needing that HDR pushing awesome HDMI cables and after reading a whole lot of stuff, still am confused whether I should get 2.0a cables or not and if 2.0 or even 1.4 will be fine. Thanks.
Re-read my post above. That should answer your questions.
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post #5 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Re-read my post above. That should answer your questions.
So those designations are for hardware only... after I remove that off the drawing board, just gotta make sure its a High speed cable with some kinda certification or authenticity and also need something that lose enough so that it doesn't cause strain on the connectors. Back to Amazon lols, thanks!

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post #6 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 11:52 AM
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BTW should I go for 21Gbps or is that overkill and 18.2Gbps would be enough?

Best,
Main Living Room: Samsung 65 KS9800 + Audio: Onkyo HT-S6300 7.1 + Sony UBP-X800 + PS4
Other Living Room: Panasonic Plasma 55 + Onkyo Home Theater System 5.1 + PS3
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post #7 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by b0rnarian View Post
BTW should I go for 21Gbps or is that overkill and 18.2Gbps would be enough?
You'll be hard pressed to find a high speed HDMI cable that is truly certified and proven to work reliably over a given length at 18Gbps, let alone 21Gbps. HDMI 2.0a theoretically covers up to around 75Gbps but you'll never see that.

The ONLY way to future-proof your HTS (Home Theater System) is to install conduit so you can easily swap out cables (twisted pairs or fiber optic) as they become more available and reliable. But, to drive the point home, the cable is just the data path. Nothing more. The deciding factor is the HDMI hardware. If your run is short and you don't need to install in-wall, then conduit is not necessary because you should be able to easily disconnect and connect new cable as the need rises, and it will.
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post #8 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
You'll be hard pressed to find a high speed HDMI cable that is truly certified and proven to work reliably over a given length at 18Gbps, let alone 21Gbps. HDMI 2.0a theoretically covers up to around 75Gbps but you'll never see that.

The ONLY way to future-proof your HTS (Home Theater System) is to install conduit so you can easily swap out cables (twisted pairs or fiber optic) as they become more available and reliable. But, to drive the point home, the cable is just the data path. Nothing more. The deciding factor is the HDMI hardware. If your run is short and you don't need to install in-wall, then conduit is not necessary because you should be able to easily disconnect and connect new cable as the need rises, and it will.
I should've mention that the longest cable I may buys is 6ft only and no more than that... would the 21 vs 18 Gb make a different then? Thanks a bunch!

Best,
Main Living Room: Samsung 65 KS9800 + Audio: Onkyo HT-S6300 7.1 + Sony UBP-X800 + PS4
Other Living Room: Panasonic Plasma 55 + Onkyo Home Theater System 5.1 + PS3
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post #9 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 01:14 PM
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I should've mention that the longest cable I may buys is 6ft only and no more than that... would the 21 vs 18 Gb make a different then? Thanks a bunch!
At 6', then practically any passive high speed HDMI cable from a reputable mfr will do. Probably even ones who claim "up to 18Gbps". Forget about 21Gbps. There aren't any cables that have proven to work reliably at that bandwidth. If you are intent on 18Gbps, then purchase a certified 6' cable from BJC, one that has been certified by DPL Labs, or preferably an ATC (Authorized Testing Center, which is approved by HDMI Licensing) certified cable. As far a 18Gbps vs 21Gbps, you need to know what your HDMI hardware can push. My guess is 18Gbps if it is new. Keep in mind that 10.2Gbps is also part of the HDMI 2.0 hardware spec so you could have HDMI 2.0 hardware but only have 10.2Gbps bandwidth capabilities.

If you're still concerned about "future proofing", just realize that in your situation, if your hardware has the most recent HDMI/HDCP chipsets in them, that you'll be changing cables until you find one that will reliably carry the bandwidth needed. At 6', you should be ok, until newer HDMI chipsets are used in newer devices.
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post #10 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
At 6', then practically any passive high speed HDMI cable from a reputable mfr will do. Probably even ones who claim "up to 18Gbps". Forget about 21Gbps. There aren't any cables that have proven to work reliably at that bandwidth. If you are intent on 18Gbps, then purchase a certified 6' cable from BJC, one that has been certified by DPL Labs, or preferably an ATC (Authorized Testing Center, which is approved by HDMI Licensing) certified cable. As far a 18Gbps vs 21Gbps, you need to know what your HDMI hardware can push. My guess is 18Gbps if it is new. Keep in mind that 10.2Gbps is also part of the HDMI 2.0 hardware spec so you could have HDMI 2.0 hardware but only have 10.2Gbps bandwidth capabilities.
I did pick up a few of the "Premium Certfied" cables from BJC - and they are a bit beefier, making them a little more challenging to route. So far so good, but I've not put them to any real sort of test, though I imagine they'll do just fine when I do. Nothing over 7'. Kinda weird, when I bought them only odd lengths had been certified, the even ones had not!
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
There is no such thing as an HDMI 2.0 cable. The number is the HDMI hardware spec, not the cable spec. Cable mfrs word their cable descriptions very carefully to a point that I think is borderline deceptive and then charge you a premium price. Monster and AudioQuest are masters at that.

The current passive, high speed HDMI cables should be able to meet the current HDMI 2.0a hardware spec. There are a lots of caveats to that though. Basically, video performance (4k, HDR, etc.) has far outpaced cable technology. It's one thing to lay a cable out in a straight line in a QC setting and claim that the 40' cable meets all HDMI 2.0a hardware specs, and then take the same cable and install it in a real world setting like your home, with your equipment, installation, etc and have the cable meet those performance expectations reliably. Shorter runs, say under about 25' should be ok but even then that's not a guarantee. Oxygen-free copper, gold plated, yadda yadda yadda is all market speak. Sure, if you monitor cables mfrd like that on sophisticated test equipment, you will see a difference in response but for the most part, that response is not perceptible to the human eyes and ears. So what you're paying for is a "superior in theory" cable, but can you tell the difference between that cable and another well made cable at a third to half the price? No.

As far as active cables go, there is nothing magical about them other than they can carry the signal at longer distances without any loss. They do that by having a chipset in the sink end (tv side) that draws a little power from the sink for error correction, timing, etc to propagate the signal for a longer distance. But even then, that has some distance limitations as well as the chipsets used.

1080p doesn't seem to be much of a problem and neither does 4k. But when you start looking at HDR (Dolby Vision, HDR10), and the 18Gbps bandwidth requirement, you start running into problems. Some cables work, some cables don't. Some folks have even gone to fiber optic cables only to find the same problems, some work, some don't.

Cables that are properly and truly certified should be what we look for. But we've seen that even some of those will have distance issues as well. A properly and truly certified cable (BJC, DPL Labs, or by an ATC) should come with a counterfeit proof label of authenticity, regardless of what the mfr says. One should be able to look up the certificate of compliance and see what the cable was actually certified for. Again, that's not a 100% guarantee that the cable will meet your expectations given your equipment and setup.

Future-proofing is the big buzzword now. The only way that one can future proof their cable installation is to use a 1.5" - 2.0" conduit, especially if you have a long run that is installed in-wall. Using a conduit will make swapping out/repairing/upgrading cable much easier than trying to fish a new cable down the wall. Some are even installing solid core CAT-6a (non-CCS and not CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) for future use, along with a pull-string in case actively terminating the in-wall cable run with something like HDBT will be necessary for the future. If I had a run longer than 25', and I wanted to install it in-wall, I'd think twice about installing an HDMI cable and look into other methods of connectivity. Otherwise, I'd just have to expect that I'll be changing out that cable probably a lot sooner than later.

For runs under about 15' for 4k, 4:4:4 @60Hz, a well made passive cable with a 24AWG wire should work. It is thicker so you will lose flexibility with possible increased strain on the HDMI inputs. Longer than that, it's a crap shoot. An active cable may allow you to push that longer but you'll have to experiment (trial and error) so find one that will work for you. The downside of active cables is that the chipset may fail overtime (like any other electronic device), or the newest video standards may require an updated Redemere chipset. In which case you'd need to replace the cable.

It's a mess. So take a deep breath, read the specs carefully, and make sure you understand completely the return policies and time frame. What ever you purchase, I'd lay it out on the floor and really test the "stuff" out of it before final installation. And be mindful of bend radius.

And one more thing..... it's helpful that all of your HDMI connected devices have the same version or build of HDMI/HDCP chipsets. Otherwise, your chain will operate at the common HDMI protocols. In other words, if your blu-ray player has current HDMI 2.0a chipsets but your tv only has HDMI 1.4 chipsets, you will only be able to take advantage of what HDMI 1.4 can handle. The cable is just the data pipe, the deciding factor is the HDMI chipsets at the sink and source end.
Otto for the win!

Bless you sir. I got much from the numbers and facts you put out (is Ethernet over HDMI a big deal? is there anything utilizing this yet?) and thank you.

Most of all, you provided the biggest sense of relief when you said it is more about matching hardware sets. It was easy to find those, at least those that suited my interests/needs.

That being said, I have to ask sir, and please forgive me, if I can restate in plain English, what you said. Or rather, if you’d agree, what you essentially said was, given the stated high speed bandwidth requirement, proper construction details, all requisite technical specs and the short distance (I bought a few 1 yard cables) the possibly certified 1.4 cables I purchased should still deliver crips, up-to-date 4K, HDR video from each of the connected, up-to-date 2.0a, 2.2 HDCP compliant devices I bought?

I hate being that dude to bother you; it’s just a lot of money, and for the amount of time I’ve poured into researching everything else (I’m absolutely comfortable with the choices I made regarding hardware) I am drawing a few blanks with this particular darn cable. For starters, and as you pointed out, one should always look for proof of certification. I can’t find squat - not on product sites, or the AQ website. So there is no way of telling what version cable it is, outside of the all-over-the-place language used on their packaging.

Also, on their website, it says their 2.5% silver-tipped cables are 1.4s that are “high speed,” but only capable of carrying 10 Gbps. The 5%, again, per their site, are the 1.4s they carry that support 18 Gbps, among other desired specs. Yet, this box that Best Buy carries states these 2.5 tipped cables are capable of delivering 4K and 3D at 18 Gbps.

I’m just so anxious. I’d rather know what to look for, because now I’m worried I won’t be able to discern what is HDR or properly upscaled 4K when I hook everything up tomorrow. I know there are internal checks for the KS8000 and XB1S that signal when HDR is properly working/being displayed, but I wonder if that will just be some 2.0a-to-2.0a over 1.4 handshake confusion, instead of the real deal. (Sorry, I am very paranoid) If I knew now, I’d just same-day or one-day ship some of these nice looking $10-$20 cables I’ve found on Amazon. I have to make familiarize myself with Best Buy’s return/exchange policy for opened HDMI packets.

For all others who are reading this - what is your experience with cables? Anyone have a favorite? Blue Jeans guys - are you happy with your cables working with 2.0a hardware/source material?

And oh yes, those buzzwords. I’m pretty gullible, I’ll admit it. But I’m never going to trust someone who guarantees me anything but a house, spouse or car for more than 10 years. These Best Buy/Sony goon squad members were pushing me to go out of my desired size class (65”) to go full on 75” X940D for double my budget. (By the way, I’ve read of many here running into these Sony/Best Buy lackeys; has anyone encountered BB salesmen absolutely tearing LG a new A, as I did? I mean, looking at 4K and Rtings, some of their black and contrast levels seemed cruddy, but that in-store demo looked phenomenal… talking 8500 and 9500)
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post #12 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 02:19 PM
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HDMI with ethernet is a spec that came out with HDMI 1.4 (maybe even 1.3?) but was never utilized by the device mfrs. You won't find a device mfr that has incorporated ethernet into their HDMI. So, when a lot of cable mfrs claim ethernet, that's nothing special because most all cables have that capability there's just no devices that use it.

Matching hardware might be more difficult than you imagine. I would think that equipment purchased this year and maybe towards the end of last year would have compatible HDMI/HDCP chipsets, and some may even be able to update via a firmware push, but confirming that information is difficult. The upper limit of HDMI 1.4 bandwidth is 10.2Gbps (actually 8.91Gbps), which just happens to be the lower end of the HDMI 2.0 specs. So, a mfr could claim HDMI 2.0 compatibility but only have 10.2Gbps capability, which could handle 4k, 4:2:0 with 8-bit resolution.

AQ is overpriced and overrated imo. The BJC (Blue Jeans Cable) has the premium series passive high speed HDMI cables that come with their own certificate of compliance. You just have to look. I don't remember but I think their certification program is an ATC. An ATC (Authorized Testing Center) is a testing center that follows the certification protocols that were designed by HDMI Licensing. They are not a cable mfr but if you purchase a cable that comes with the Premium High Speed HDMI cable name, that is the official name given to a cable that has been tested by an ATC. The cable will also come with a laser label that is counterfeit proof. DPL Labs doesn't make cables that I am aware of but they do test and certify cables for other mfrs. They don't follow the exact same protocols as HDMI Licensing but they have a pretty good and extensive testing program.

I wouldn't be too concerned about what components go into the cable. If it is made by a reputable mfr, and is tested and certified, that's the best you can do regardless of silver-tipped connectors, gold plating, etc. That only matters if all of the components that come into contact with each other, such as the actual cable and the input, are made of the same composition. Otherwise, you have unlike metals making contact. However, will you notice a difference, probably not. There are lots of bogus and counterfeit cheap Chinese made cables though so you have to be careful.

So, given the hardware you have, and the 6', length, I'd just look for a Premium High Speed HDMI cable that comes with a Certificate of Authenticity and be done with it. If you do have issues, changing a 6' cable that is not installed in-wall is a piece of cake as opposed to a 30' cable installed in-wall.
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post #13 of 43 Old 08-22-2016, 04:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
HDMI with ethernet is a spec that came out with HDMI 1.4 (maybe even 1.3?) but was never utilized by the device mfrs. You won't find a device mfr that has incorporated ethernet into their HDMI. So, when a lot of cable mfrs claim ethernet, that's nothing special because most all cables have that capability there's just no devices that use it.

Matching hardware might be more difficult than you imagine. I would think that equipment purchased this year and maybe towards the end of last year would have compatible HDMI/HDCP chipsets, and some may even be able to update via a firmware push, but confirming that information is difficult. The upper limit of HDMI 1.4 bandwidth is 10.2Gbps (actually 8.91Gbps), which just happens to be the lower end of the HDMI 2.0 specs. So, a mfr could claim HDMI 2.0 compatibility but only have 10.2Gbps capability, which could handle 4k, 4:2:0 with 8-bit resolution.

AQ is overpriced and overrated imo. The BJC (Blue Jeans Cable) has the premium series passive high speed HDMI cables that come with their own certificate of compliance. You just have to look. I don't remember but I think their certification program is an ATC. An ATC (Authorized Testing Center) is a testing center that follows the certification protocols that were designed by HDMI Licensing. They are not a cable mfr but if you purchase a cable that comes with the Premium High Speed HDMI cable name, that is the official name given to a cable that has been tested by an ATC. The cable will also come with a laser label that is counterfeit proof. DPL Labs doesn't make cables that I am aware of but they do test and certify cables for other mfrs. They don't follow the exact same protocols as HDMI Licensing but they have a pretty good and extensive testing program.

I wouldn't be too concerned about what components go into the cable. If it is made by a reputable mfr, and is tested and certified, that's the best you can do regardless of silver-tipped connectors, gold plating, etc. That only matters if all of the components that come into contact with each other, such as the actual cable and the input, are made of the same composition. Otherwise, you have unlike metals making contact. However, will you notice a difference, probably not. There are lots of bogus and counterfeit cheap Chinese made cables though so you have to be careful.

So, given the hardware you have, and the 6', length, I'd just look for a Premium High Speed HDMI cable that comes with a Certificate of Authenticity and be done with it. If you do have issues, changing a 6' cable that is not installed in-wall is a piece of cake as opposed to a 30' cable installed in-wall.
Brief response - thank you Otto. Vote Otto in 2016. If he wants. Pons, out.

Also, will post reviews for KS8000, CT790, XB1S HDR playback later.
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post #14 of 43 Old 08-23-2016, 08:37 PM
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I have been feeling the pain of this as well. I have a 1 1/4" conduit in wall running from my tv in a nearby closet. The minimum cable I can run is a 12'. I had good luck with a Blackweb 12' cable from walmart in a pinch when my older cable died, but that cable doesn't seem to want to support the 4k DHR signal well. I am running an xbox one s on a sony xbr 65 850C. When I start up uhd blu rays, the screen flickers a few times, and keeps telling me that the signal is changing. The colors change slightly, and I keep seeing thing input, or a blank screen for a second. Once the movie gets rolling it seems fine, but when I exit the movie it goes a little crazy. I assume some of this is Xbox related and may get updated, but i can't stand all of the crap in the start. I mean, the opening credits weren't even watchable.

I attempted to use a Vizio brand "4k" cable, that says UP TO 18 GBPS, but then follows that up with 28 awg, which is too small and tells me the 18gbps is a hoax.
I attempted an older high speed 4k cable, but it too did not work and in fact was flickering NON STOP.

I would like to buy local so I can return the cable without a hassle if it doesn't work for me. I hate paying out the butt for cables locally though, but I am on cable #3 with no luck.

Opinions on the following?

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/rocketfi...&skuId=3721001


http://www.homedepot.com/p/CE-TECH-1...2041/205319611
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post #15 of 43 Old 08-25-2016, 01:39 AM
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HDMI Cables are either Standard, High Speed, Premium High Speed or non Certified - that's it, nothing else!

References to 4K, 18Gb etc is all just marketing guff - look for the official Certification logo and ignore anything else.

pons823 - I'd take them back for a Refund.

PS 'better audio' - that has to take the prize for biggest BS feature

b0rnarian - stick with whatever cables you have now until they either fail or you start to see very obvious image problems.

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post #16 of 43 Old 01-01-2017, 06:22 PM
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A few times it's been mentioned to "check" or "test" the cables once bought, but how exactly does one go about doing that? I'm very luck to have a new LG OLED55B6P and as far as I can tell there's no way to press Info on the remote and have the TV tell you what resolution it's showing in like some TV's. So is there a way, besides just trying to judge for yourself by looking, to actually confirm that what you're watching is 4k or HDR?

I appreciate the help!
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post #17 of 43 Old 01-02-2017, 06:31 AM
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Power your system Off at the wall, connect up the New HDMI cable now test it with each Source at all required Resolutions with all signal formats, give each Source an extended test period.

You will quickly see if you are having any problems.

Your LG TV Remote should have an 'Info button' - on the 'Magic' remote it sits below the Settings (gear) button.

Hitting info will let you see what signal format the TV is receiving/decoding - including HRD (if active). It won't tell you everything but ought to cover the basics.

See ident at top left of these screenshots with an LG 950 OLED.

https://www.facebook.com/TheMediaFac...868345480816:0

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post #18 of 43 Old 01-23-2017, 07:35 PM
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interesting read about cables. i usually always buy my hdmi cables from monoprice. are their cables good? will i be getting what im paying for?
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post #19 of 43 Old 01-23-2017, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Dymek View Post
interesting read about cables. i usually always buy my hdmi cables from monoprice. are their cables good? will i be getting what im paying for?
Monoprice, BJC, and MediaBridge all make good cables. However, it depends on what you want to push down the pipe and how far, as to whether ANY cable will work for you.
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post #20 of 43 Old 01-24-2017, 04:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Monoprice, BJC, and MediaBridge all make good cables. However, it depends on what you want to push down the pipe and how far, as to whether ANY cable will work for you.
everything is all contained in my tv stand. its probably a 5-6 ft run. i like to get a bit longer cables just so they don't snag or anything ive had that happen.

this will be for 4k tv watching. im getting a vizio p 55 so i need it to be able to handle 18gbps. i found a cable that says premium "certified" but it looks like the real thing it has a qr code on the site that you can scan.
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post #21 of 43 Old 01-24-2017, 07:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Dymek View Post
everything is all contained in my tv stand. its probably a 5-6 ft run. i like to get a bit longer cables just so they don't snag or anything ive had that happen.

this will be for 4k tv watching. im getting a vizio p 55 so i need it to be able to handle 18gbps. i found a cable that says premium "certified" but it looks like the real thing it has a qr code on the site that you can scan.
A Premium High Speed HDMI cables with a QR code is one that is certified by an ATC (Authorized Testing Center) using the protocols designed and approved by HDMI Licensing. I don't think they will certify above 25'. You don't need 18Gbps for 4k (UHD) unless you want to push 4:4:4 @60Hz, in which case you are limited by distance. No cable is 100% guaranteed to meet everyone's needs. The cable is just the pipe, other factors such as distance (mentioned), setup, HDMI chipsets, bend radius, etc all play a factor in a reliable signal path. At 10' you should be ok but as I said, there are no guarantees.
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hi, can anyone tell me if these cables are any good for HDR (which i believe is on the hdmi 2.0a spec)

ive read that all the cable needs to be is high speed and itll work, but i would like to double check before dropping cash on them.

Also is the make (in this case IBRA) any good?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/IBRA-Speed-...270175&sr=1-15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandysnap View Post
hi, can anyone tell me if these cables are any good for HDR (which i believe is on the hdmi 2.0a spec)

ive read that all the cable needs to be is high speed and itll work, but i would like to double check before dropping cash on them.

Also is the make (in this case IBRA) any good?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/IBRA-Speed-...270175&sr=1-15
Monoprice.com HDMI premium certified cables $4.29
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post #24 of 43 Old 01-24-2017, 08:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
A Premium High Speed HDMI cables with a QR code is one that is certified by an ATC (Authorized Testing Center) using the protocols designed and approved by HDMI Licensing. I don't think they will certify above 25'. You don't need 18Gbps for 4k (UHD) unless you want to push 4:4:4 @60Hz, in which case you are limited by distance. No cable is 100% guaranteed to meet everyone's needs. The cable is just the pipe, other factors such as distance (mentioned), setup, HDMI chipsets, bend radius, etc all play a factor in a reliable signal path. At 10' you should be ok but as I said, there are no guarantees.


Well I exclusively use monoprice cables and haven't had a issue. I just want to make sure there isn't a bottle neck in getting the best picture I can.

Is there a specific HDMI version to do HDR?
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post #25 of 43 Old 01-24-2017, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandysnap View Post
hi, can anyone tell me if these cables are any good for HDR (which i believe is on the hdmi 2.0a spec)

ive read that all the cable needs to be is high speed and itll work, but i would like to double check before dropping cash on them.

Also is the make (in this case IBRA) any good?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/IBRA-Speed-...270175&sr=1-15
The HDMI 2.0a hardware spec is for HDR. There is no cable spec regardless of what the cable mfr states. What you need are passive/active High Speed HDMI cables, which have been around since the HDMI 1.4 hardware spec. The problem is that the more demanding video specs of HDR require a higher bandwidth, up to 18Gbps, and are distance limited. Cable mfrs come and go so there's no telling if IBRA cables are any good or not (the link timed out for me so I can't check the specs). Cable mfrs will make all kinds of claims, most of which are just repeating what's in the HDMI 2.0(a) hardware specifications. I don't know of any cable that has been certified by a standardized certification protocol to reliably push 18Gbps for a given length. Most say "up to 18Gbps" but you don't know what "up to" actually means. The only standardized certification program is one designed by HDMI Licensing. They have ATC's (Authorized Testing Centers) in various locations around the world and all follow the same certification protocols so if they pass, a counterfeit proof label is affixed (QR code) to guarantee authenticity. Any cable mfrs can submit their cables for certification if they are willing to pay the price. So, not all cables are certified by an ATC. Some cable mfrs have their own certification/testing program and you don't know if they are any better, or worse, than an ATC. However, even with a certification, there are no 100% guarantees that the cable will meet your needs and expectations because of cable length, wire gauge, hardware, setup, etc. Currently, ATC will not certify a cable past 25'. Hopefully that will change in the future. You chances for copper-based cables are better if you use an ATC certified cable under about 15' - 20' with a wire gauge of AWG24, and keep the bend radius to a minimum. Thicker gauge cables are always a bit better but you lose flexibility and increase the strain on the HDMI input. Depending on the length of your run, some folks have had good luck with fiber optic cables like Celerity.
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post #26 of 43 Old 01-24-2017, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Dymek View Post
Well I exclusively use monoprice cables and haven't had a issue. I just want to make sure there isn't a bottle neck in getting the best picture I can.

Is there a specific HDMI version to do HDR?

As I stated above, the HDMI hardware specification for HDR is HDMI 2.0a. There is no cable specification other than passive/active High Speed HDMI.
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post #27 of 43 Old 01-27-2017, 12:43 AM
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The IBRA cable linked to lacks any indication that it has any form of HDMI Certification - the page is simply a collection of key words to attract search engines.

As others have said look for a Premium High Speed certified cable - http://www.hdmi.org/manufacturer/pre...n_Program.aspx

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post #28 of 43 Old 05-22-2017, 07:22 AM
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Hi,

I've just bought an HDR LG OLED55C6V and I've a lot of deception with 4k HDR movies; here is an example of the color banding with Kingsman 4k bluray with HDR mode ON :



I suspect the bandswitch of my HDMI High Speed cable ( bought recently ) as when I start a movie I have the same bug with a lot of macro blocking as when you loose just a few second your satelite or digital terrestrial television signal ( the subject of the image is barely recognisable with color abberations for example ) and during the movie I can see a lot of small macroblock on the "same color " area like for example a sky or a dark wall etc

Thanks by advance
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post #29 of 43 Old 05-22-2017, 09:37 AM
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What is the length of your cable run? HDR can be difficult over about 20' because of the cable. Regardless of the cable mfr claims, 4k, 4:4:4 @60Hz is very difficult to do reliably. A fiber optic cable may be your best choice. Video technology has far outpaced the connection technology so far.
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post #30 of 43 Old 05-24-2017, 02:48 PM
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3 meters

Here are an example of what happen when I launch a movie during the first few seconds



after i have nothing like this crap except color banding and easy to see tiny macroblocks or compression artefact ( I don't knowhow to call them )

Last edited by BenTSH; 05-24-2017 at 02:52 PM.
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