TEST REPORTS | HDMI CABLES WHICH PROPERLY AND RELIABLY SUPPORT 18GBPS & HDMI 2.0b - Page 3 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #61 of 400 Old 05-11-2017, 04:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post
I bought the RUIPRO 33' from Amazon and tested it with Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk. It worked!
Just to be clear to all those doing their own testing.....

Even when testing with Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk (a 60fps UHD Blu-ray) you still have to be 100% sure that your player is outputting 4K/60 4:2:2 12-bit. Only in that one mode is the player sending 18Gbps. It is quite likely, even probable, that by default your player will use 4K/60 4:2:0 10-bit, which only requires 11.1Gbps and so comes nowhere near to testing the limits of HDMI 2.0.
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post #62 of 400 Old 05-11-2017, 05:31 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Basa14 View Post
AVS'ers,

Where do you get the 6m Ruipro cable? On Amazon, at least in the States, they start at 10 m cables.

Thank you for this excellent resource,

Basa14
Quote:
Originally Posted by markrubin
Good morning

I got the33 foot Ruipro cable and it works!

now I am trying to buy more but in 20 foot length and they appear to be out of stock: can you help me find a source to order more 20 foot cables? I am going to replace all my long HDMI cables with these

Mark
Yes, unfortunately it looks like quite a few people have been purchasing the 20ft/6m RUIPRO cables causing them run out of stock... But this also happened with respect to the longer cables too, where these were restocked pretty quckly... So our recommendation is to either wait for these to be restocked, which shouldn't be very long, or alternatively simply purchase the 30ft/9m Monoprice cables which are only $16 more expensive if you purchase these with free shipping via Amazon: Monoprice SlimRun AV HDR Cable for HDMI Enabled Devices, 4K@60Hz, YUV4:4:4, 30ft
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post #63 of 400 Old 05-11-2017, 05:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jong1 View Post
Just to be clear to all those doing their own testing.....



Even when testing with Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk (a 60fps UHD Blu-ray) you still have to be 100% sure that your player is outputting 4K/60 4:2:2 12-bit. Only in that one mode is the player sending 18Gbps. It is quite likely, even probable, that by default your player will use 4K/60 4:2:0 10-bit, which only requires 11.1Gbps and so comes nowhere near to testing the limits of HDMI 2.0.


Thank you @jong1 , this is very helpful information. I'll check my settings tonight and see if I can force my player to send 4:2:2 12 bit.

Does the movie need to be 4:2:2 12 bit to make this a valid test? Is Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk 4:2:2 12 bit?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

PN59D8000 and JVC RS420 with Elite 120" screen
Receiver - Yamaha RX-A3060, WXA-50 MusicCast Amp for Zone 2
Front - CM9, Center - CMC2, Side Surrounds - DS3, Rear Surrounds - CM5, Front/Rear Atmos - CCM663, Subs - PB12+ and PB13 Ultra
Remote/Streaming Media Players - Harmony Elite, Apple TV 4, Nvidia Shield Pro - use with HDHomeRun Connect/Extend and Plex

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post #64 of 400 Old 05-11-2017, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post
Thank you @jong1 , this is very helpful information. I'll check my settings tonight and see if I can force my player to send 4:2:2 12 bit.

Does the movie need to be 4:2:2 12 bit to make this a valid test? Is Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk 4:2:2 12 bit?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
No problem. No, all Blu-ray (UHD and HD) are 4:2:0 on disc. All HDR10 discs (currently all UHD HDR discs!) are 10-bit. But, it's still possible on some players (e.g. Oppo) to force 4:2:2 12-bit output. If you cannot force 4:2:2 the alternative is to play non-HDR 4K/60Hz in YCbCr 4:4:4 or RGB mode. 4K/60 4:4:4 8-bit is also 18Gbps. But, note, this has to be non-HDR as 4K/60 4:4:4 is not possible at more than 8-bit depth and if you play an HDR title it will drop the chroma subsampling down, probably to 4:2:0! Hope that's clear .
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post #65 of 400 Old 05-12-2017, 03:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post
I bought the RUIPRO 33' from Amazon and tested it with Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk. It worked!

Free 2 day shipping with Prime, which is why I chose it over Monoprice.
The Monoprice cables are also available from Amazon with free shipping with Prime

SEE: Monoprice SlimRun AV HDR Cable for HDMI Enabled Devices, 4K@60Hz, YUV4:4:4 | 30ft/9m

AND: Monoprice SlimRun AV HDR Cable for HDMI Enabled Devices, 4K@60Hz, YUV4:4:4 | 50ft/15m


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post #66 of 400 Old 05-12-2017, 04:55 AM
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Wow, great resource. Thank you!

Cheers,
Ray
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post #67 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Basa14 View Post
Thank you for the info!

Basa14
Wow.. I really could have used this thread last month when I was redoing everything in my HT.

I went through a nightmare changing cables multiple times and 4 different AVR's. No one is putting information like this out and so I think this is a great thread that needs to be passed on to every forum out on the web...

I have a 50' run to my new 65" LG oled e6 and was at my wits end... Multiple phone calls to Denon, Pioneer, Marantz, My CableMart, I scrapped the idea of a long hdmi cable(including fiber optic) and went with a shielded cat 6 set up which works great with no drop outs or handshake issues.

While it's certainly not as cheap, it's a lot easier to run in my home where I have to run it. My original run is next to impossible to get to without tearing up the room.



Thanks for starting this thread

Mac
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post #68 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 11:10 AM
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^^^^^ shielded CAT-6. Is that a CAT-6 ethernet patch cable or a solid core CAT-6 cable (non-CCS) that you have to terminate the ends either with HDBT or some other type of active termination?
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post #69 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
^^^^^ shielded CAT-6. Is that a CAT-6 ethernet patch cable or a solid core CAT-6 cable (non-CCS) that you have to terminate the ends either with HDBT or some other type of active termination?
I am assuming it's just a regular shielded cat-6 patch.

When I started calling different companies for cables that would work, the only one that guaranteed their stuff over 30' were these folks.. I spent 2 weeks sold trying everything to work right

http://www.hdtvsupply.com/hdbaset-2-...-extender.html. They sent me this link from which I ordered

I got everything from them including 2 6' cables to go from the Air into the balin and from the other receiver balin to the display.

I've played 5 different 4k movies and tons of other ones so far and everything is working well with no issues (knock wood)..

I'll have to go get the "Long Walk Home" movie and try the 4:4:4 setting since the ones that I have don't say anything about this on it.. Shouldn't be a since my Oppo 203 has all the settings..

Mac
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post #70 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 02:04 PM
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For Long Walk, as in Arrow-AV's test, to fully test your system you need to set the Oppo to output 4:2:2 12-bit.
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post #71 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by jong1 View Post
For Long Walk, as in Arrow-AV's test, to fully test your system you need to set the Oppo to output 4:2:2 12-bit.
OK Thanks.. I'll see if I can get it tonite or tomorrow.

I just tried it with Fantastic Beast and it took it forcing it to 12 bit 4:2:2 just fine but since it's being tested with Long Walk, I might as well get that disc to be sure everything is working properly..

Mac

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post #72 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by St.Louis Mac View Post
I am assuming it's just a regular shielded cat-6 patch.

When I started calling different companies for cables that would work, the only one that guaranteed their stuff over 30' were these folks.. I spent 2 weeks sold trying everything to work right

http://www.hdtvsupply.com/hdbaset-2-...-extender.html. They sent me this link from which I ordered

I got everything from them including 2 6' cables to go from the Air into the balin and from the other receiver balin to the display.

I've played 5 different 4k movies and tons of other ones so far and everything is working well with no issues (knock wood)..

I'll have to go get the "Long Walk Home" movie and try the 4:4:4 setting since the ones that I have don't say anything about this on it.. Shouldn't be a since my Oppo 203 has all the settings..

Mac
Cool. If you've got your cabling working the way you want then stick with it. Most of the time HDBT is used in conjunction with solid core CAT-6 (not terminated) and not CAT-6 patch because the wires are solid copper, individually insulted, and a thicker gauge. The cable is usually stiffer than patch cable but that makes it a lot easier to fish thru a conduit (which you should be using if you have along, in-wall run). Just be mindful of the bend radius.

You need to be careful with HDBT because some of them still use the older chipsets and may not be able to give you the performance you need for long runs. The other advantage of solid core CAT-6 in-conduit is that you can run another cable or two and use one of them to extend your ethernet connection (which is what I do) using a punchdown keystone jack (instead of HDBT) so that you can hardwire your HTS instead of depending on WiFi. Solid core in-conduit will probably give you better performance as the video standards become more demanding because ethernet patch cable will just not be able to handle the bandwidth. The only disadvantage of HDBT, at this point in time, is that you will have wait for the chipsets to be upgraded. But HDBT is external to the cable so fishing cable, in theory, shouldn't have to happen. This will especially be true once fully compliant HDMI 2.1 chipsets are included with new devices. Again, conduit is your friend in case you need to run a fiber optic cable.
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post #73 of 400 Old 05-13-2017, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Cool. If you've got your cabling working the way you want then stick with it. Most of the time HDBT is used in conjunction with solid core CAT-6 (not terminated) and not CAT-6 patch because the wires are solid copper, individually insulted, and a thicker gauge. The cable is usually stiffer than patch cable but that makes it a lot easier to fish thru a conduit (which you should be using if you have along, in-wall run). Just be mindful of the bend radius.

You need to be careful with HDBT because some of them still use the older chipsets and may not be able to give you the performance you need for long runs. The other advantage of solid core CAT-6 in-conduit is that you can run another cable or two and use one of them to extend your ethernet connection (which is what I do) using a punchdown keystone jack (instead of HDBT) so that you can hardwire your HTS instead of depending on WiFi. Solid core in-conduit will probably give you better performance as the video standards become more demanding because ethernet patch cable will just not be able to handle the bandwidth. The only disadvantage of HDBT, at this point in time, is that you will have wait for the chipsets to be upgraded. But HDBT is external to the cable so fishing cable, in theory, shouldn't have to happen. This will especially be true once fully compliant HDMI 2.1 chipsets are included with new devices. Again, conduit is your friend in case you need to run a fiber optic cable.
Thanks..

I wish I had conduit to the display, it would make my life a whole lot easier... Lol.. Unfortunately I don't have, and I already know the hassle getting fiber over the ceiling to it.. It's a real pita trying to get any cable ran, and since I know that I have to cut in access panels yet just to get wire to my Atmos speakers, I might just try to get this done to so I won't have to fight with it any more.

I'm driving my wife nuts with all of this and spending way too much time working on it, instead of just enjoying it... Oh well

I do have 1 more question... You asked about "active termination"...? I have to have power going to the transmitter and the receiver balins.. What your asking is something different correct?

Thanks again

Mac

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post #74 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 12:33 AM
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OK Thanks.. I'll see if I can get it tonite or tomorrow.

I just tried it with Fantastic Beast and it took it forcing it to 12 bit 4:2:2 just fine but since it's being tested with Long Walk, I might as well get that disc to be sure everything is working properly..

Mac
Fantastic Beasts (24 fps) will only need 8.9 Gbps (half the max) even using 4:2:2 12-bit, which is why it is so important to make sure you use the right source material and the right video mode when testing. Of course, depending on when you forced 4:2:2 12-bit, it's possible some menus were 60 Hz and really tested 18 Gbps, but you'll feel safer when you have watched a few hours at that bitrate.
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post #75 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by St.Louis Mac View Post
I do have 1 more question... You asked about "active termination"...? I have to have power going to the transmitter and the receiver balins.. What your asking is something different correct?

Thanks again

Mac
No. Active termination is terminating the cable with some sort of power supply to power the chipsets for error correction, timing, etc. It's the same thing as using an active HDMI cable. The chipsets are in the sink end (tv side) and they draw a little power from the HDMI input.
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post #76 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 09:47 AM
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HDbaseT 2.0 does not support HDMI 2.0a 18 Gb/s!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jong1 View Post
Fantastic Beasts (24 fps) will only need 8.9 Gbps (half the max) even using 4:2:2 12-bit, which is why it is so important to make sure you use the right source material and the right video mode when testing.
I can't agree more. I'm finding specs missing key factors. For example, the WolfPack HDBaseT 2.0 extenders mentioned above specs "HDMI 2.0 4K2K @ 60Hz with YCbCr 4:2:0" bit do NOT specify number of bits per pixel. 8 bit (aka 24 bit) takes significantly less bandwidth. Only 12 bit (aka 36 bit) uses the full 18 Gb/s rates at 4K2K @ 60Hz YCbCr 4:2:0. Interestingly, later on in the specs, they do fully describe support at 1080p: "Full HD support at 1080p @ 60Hz @ 24/36/48bit/pixels." So I have to conclude 10 and 12 bit pixel depths are not supported at 4K rates.

Even the HDbaseT 2.0 spec does not commit to the full 18 Gb/s required to support HDMI 2.0a/b. Wikipedia has this to say about HDbaseT 2.0 for video: "Due to bitrate limitations of 10.2 Gbit/s instead of the required 18 Gbit/s in the HDMI 2.0 specification, HDBaseT 2.0 can only support 4K at 30 Hz not the full 60 Hz."

And at this link:

http://www.cepro.com/article/handlin...g_hdbaset_2_0#

"HDMI 2.0 and HDBaseT 2.0 are not fully compatible when it comes to bandwidth. Transmitting 4K content over 60Hz requires the “full envelope” of 18Gbps bandwidth in HDMI 2.0, but HDBaseT 2.0 does not extend beyond the 10.2Gbps bandwidth found in HDMI 1.4."

In fact, HDMI 2.0 a, b or whatever supports 4K @ 60 4:4:4 but only at 8 bits (aka 24 bits) per pixel but does not support 4K @ 60 4:4:4 with 10 or 12 bits per pixel. The only way to get 10 or 12 bits per pixel is to drop down to 24 or 30 frames per second or to 4:2:2 or 4:2:0 color subsampling.
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post #77 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 11:05 AM
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^^^^^ unfortunately the HDMI 2.0a/b chipsets are still not full available yet in all devices that are active for the higher video standards, be it HDBT or active HDMI cables. There's a lot of "older" cable inventory still out in the marketplace for sale. And, finding out which chipset(s) are installed is almost impossible. This is why video technology is still outpacing the connection technology, regardless of what the cable mfrs and/or resellers market their products as. This is only going to get a lot worse once HDMI 2.1 is fully available in the devices, especially for folks with runs longer than about 10' - 15'. A standardized form of cable certification is desperately needed but the only truly standardized one is HDMI.org's ATC program, which is expensive and not used by everyone.
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post #78 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 04:02 PM
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Can confirm that THIS RUIPRO worked flawlessly! Thanks for a great thread.
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Cheers,
Ray
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post #79 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 05:47 PM
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Can anyone comment on ARC support with the Monoprice winning cable. Reading some of the comments on the Monoprice website ARC appears to be a issue. It would be great if the testers could also test ARC support with these long cables. Thx
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post #80 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 05:56 PM
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If the cable says it supports ARC, which most, if not all current high speed HDMI cables do, then that shouldn't be a problem. The issues that most have with ARC/CEC is not the cable itself but the non-standardized protocols in the devices which results in an incompatibility issue. For systems that have individual control over ARC and CEC they should be better at handling that because CEC can be disabled, which seems to be the culprit. All you can do is try.
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post #81 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwindrem View Post
I can't agree more. I'm finding specs missing key factors. For example, the WolfPack HDBaseT 2.0 extenders mentioned above specs "HDMI 2.0 4K2K @ 60Hz with YCbCr 4:2:0" bit do NOT specify number of bits per pixel. 8 bit (aka 24 bit) takes significantly less bandwidth. Only 12 bit (aka 36 bit) uses the full 18 Gb/s rates at 4K2K @ 60Hz YCbCr 4:2:0. Interestingly, later on in the specs, they do fully describe support at 1080p: "Full HD support at 1080p @ 60Hz @ 24/36/48bit/pixels." So I have to conclude 10 and 12 bit pixel depths are not supported at 4K rates.

Even the HDbaseT 2.0 spec does not commit to the full 18 Gb/s required to support HDMI 2.0a/b. Wikipedia has this to say about HDbaseT 2.0 for video: "Due to bitrate limitations of 10.2 Gbit/s instead of the required 18 Gbit/s in the HDMI 2.0 specification, HDBaseT 2.0 can only support 4K at 30 Hz not the full 60 Hz."

And at this link:

http://www.cepro.com/article/handlin...g_hdbaset_2_0#

"HDMI 2.0 and HDBaseT 2.0 are not fully compatible when it comes to bandwidth. Transmitting 4K content over 60Hz requires the “full envelope” of 18Gbps bandwidth in HDMI 2.0, but HDBaseT 2.0 does not extend beyond the 10.2Gbps bandwidth found in HDMI 1.4."

In fact, HDMI 2.0 a, b or whatever supports 4K @ 60 4:4:4 but only at 8 bits (aka 24 bits) per pixel but does not support 4K @ 60 4:4:4 with 10 or 12 bits per pixel. The only way to get 10 or 12 bits per pixel is to drop down to 24 or 30 frames per second or to 4:2:2 or 4:2:0 color subsampling.
I questioned them when I bought it...hmmm... The atlona one shows something more http://www.hdtvsupply.com/atlona-at-uhd-ex-70c-kit.html

I'm getting really confused about all of this

I'm not a gamer nor am I trying to expand my my ethernet.. It's just being fed from my Marantz 7711 Avr which has a Oppo 203, a TiVo Bolt and a Firestick..

Do I need more than what I have to get the best I can???

Thanks

Mac
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post #82 of 400 Old 05-14-2017, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
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The atlona one shows something more http://www.hdtvsupply.com/atlona-at-uhd-ex-70c-kit.html

Do I need more than what I have to get the best I can???
It is always possible the specs are out of date. The specs in the manual for the Atlona unit also shows a 10.2 Gb/s limit not 18 Gb/s.

What you actually need depends on the content you are interested in and the devices that provide the video. The Oppo BDP-203 should allow you to set up to pass native resolution which in most cases is within the 10.2 Gb/s limit. I'm not familiar with the Tivo so can't say if you'd need 18 Gb/s. The FireStick is not UHD(4K) so that won't be an issue

The Sony UBP-x800 has at least some control over how discs are handled but from what I've read in the owner's thread has locked in streaming to 60 Hz output. So in that case, 18 Gb/s is needed for HDR, which is wasteful.

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post #83 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 12:17 AM
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The Sony UBP-x800 has at least some control over how discs are handled but from what I've read in the owner's thread has locked in streaming to 60 Hz output. So in that case, 18 Gb/s is needed for HDR, which is wasteful.
It's this kind of thing that is the biggest problem. Most people are only interested in video and all commercial video is natively 4:2:0. Most HDR movies are 4K/24 10-bit, so actually don't need to push the boundaries of the spec. But, because source devices expect all modes up to 18Gb/s to be supported, some use them "because they're best" or simply because it's easier to use just one, like 4K/60 4:2:2 12-bit (18Gb/s). I don't know if it's still true but the Chromecast Ultra was one such device, that used (maybe still uses) 4K/60 4:2:2 12-bit, even for its backdrop slideshow.

So, all your current devices may work fine without all HDMI 2.0 modes working. If you don't plan on changing for some time it may be fine to relax and accept it. But, especially if installing a new system, without knowing what devices you will want to connect in the coming years, it's pretty important to make sure HDMI 2.0b is fully supported.

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post #84 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by kwindrem View Post
It is always possible the specs are out of date. The specs in the manual for the Atlona unit also shows a 10.2 Gb/s limit not 18 Gb/s.

What you actually need depends on the content you are interested in and the devices that provide the video. The Oppo BDP-203 should allow you to set up to pass native resolution which in most cases is within the 10.2 Gb/s limit. I'm not familiar with the Tivo so can't say if you'd need 18 Gb/s. The FireStick is not UHD(4K) so that won't be an issue

The Sony UBP-x800 has at least some control over how discs are handled but from what I've read in the owner's thread has locked in streaming to 60 Hz output. So in that case, 18 Gb/s is needed for HDR, which is wasteful.
Thanks.

I don't have any Sony products in the mix, my display is a 2016 LG oled65e6p and the Firestick TV second gen is the one that I have.

My HT is my primary viewing area and I am interested in having it setup to give us the best picture quality, so if changing or upgrading the cabling to get this then I will,however I just don't want to throw money away in the process, if it's not necessary for what I am doing. Like I said, I am not gaming with it, and don't plan on doing it either. We are about 50/50% regular TV and movies here as well as music so this is what my needs are for. I don't see any other component changes for several years, but know that there will be firmware updates for what I have right now...

With as fast as everything is changing, the last thing I want to do is to have to change the cabling again, so.. I guess I need to find out about the cat 6 cable to see if it's capable of handling the load.. HDTV supply said that it would, but with everything that folks here have said has me worried that it won't.

Thanks again

Mac

Edit

I just ordered a 50' solid core from Bluejeans, so I can take that out of the equation.. I'll have to wait until the dust settles on all of the standards for changing the Baluns if I have to..

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post #85 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 08:58 AM
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Keep in mind that cables can not give you better video or audio fidelity. They either work or they don't. A $15 cable can give you the exact same pq that a $60 cable can all things being the same.

Accurately and consistently delivering 18Gbps is still difficult for distances over about 20'. Some cable work and some don't. There are lots of factors involved so it's just not distance alone. The ARROW-AV testing is a good place to start. Just pick your distance and see if that cable works. We can't stress the use of a conduit enough if your distance requires an in-wall installation. Regardless of what cables are out there today, they will not be able to handle the upcoming video standards (HDMI 2.1) so you will be swapping out those cables if you want to run a fully compliant HDMI 2.1 system. Or, you can install an active fiber optic cable now and hopefully the termination ends can be upgraded as soon as the newer chipsets become available. If you do run conduit, throw in an extra solid core CAT-6 (non-CCS and not CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) cable, along with a pull-string, just in case for future use. The only true way to "future proof" your system is to use conduit.

BTW, a solid core CAT-6 cable is usually sold in 25' or longer spools and does not come terminated. You either need to terminate it with a punchdown keystone jack if you want to use it to extend your ethernet connection or some sort of active termination like HDBT for video.
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post #86 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Keep in mind that cables can not give you better video or audio fidelity. They either work or they don't. A $15 cable can give you the exact same pq that a $60 cable can all things being the same.

Accurately and consistently delivering 18Gbps is still difficult for distances over about 20'. Some cable work and some don't. There are lots of factors involved so it's just not distance alone. The ARROW-AV testing is a good place to start. Just pick your distance and see if that cable works. We can't stress the use of a conduit enough if your distance requires an in-wall installation. Regardless of what cables are out there today, they will not be able to handle the upcoming video standards (HDMI 2.1) so you will be swapping out those cables if you want to run a fully compliant HDMI 2.1 system. Or, you can install an active fiber optic cable now and hopefully the termination ends can be upgraded as soon as the newer chipsets become available. If you do run conduit, throw in an extra solid core CAT-6 (non-CCS and not CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) cable, along with a pull-string, just in case for future use. The only true way to "future proof" your system is to use conduit.

BTW, a solid core CAT-6 cable is usually sold in 25' or longer spools and does not come terminated. You either need to terminate it with a punchdown keystone jack if you want to use it to extend your ethernet connection or some sort of active termination like HDBT for video.
Thanks Otto..

I'm going with the solid cat 6 but it's not going to be in the ceiling and the folks at Bluejeans are terminating it for me. While not as pretty as having a wallplate, at least for now I'm not having to tear into the walls. Once all the new standards are out, I'll move it up and put it in conduit.

Mac
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post #87 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by St.Louis Mac View Post
Thanks Otto..

I'm going with the solid cat 6 but it's not going to be in the ceiling and the folks at Bluejeans are terminating it for me. While not as pretty as having a wallplate, at least for now I'm not having to tear into the walls. Once all the new standards are out, I'll move it up and put it in conduit.

Mac
Just make sure that the folks at BlueJeans, who are really good to work with, have the same understanding about what solid core is. The cable needs to be solid copper wire, usually 24AWG, and not Copper Coated Steel (CCS). Otherwise, you're just getting CAT-6 ethernet patch cable.
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post #88 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Just make sure that the folks at BlueJeans, who are really good to work with, have the same understanding about what solid core is. The cable needs to be solid copper wire, usually 24AWG, and not Copper Coated Steel (CCS). Otherwise, you're just getting CAT-6 ethernet patch cable.
Thanks again Otto.. According to Jeff at Bluejeans they don't sell the ccs stuff.. So I think I am good to go this time...

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post #89 of 400 Old 05-15-2017, 02:38 PM
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Given that long cables are often used in-wall it would be useful to know the specific ratings of the cable. For example, from what I can see two of the most appealing cable series (Monoprice and RUIPRO fiber optics) may not be explicitly rated for in-wall use.

For example, the Monoprice 21566 is flame tested to VW-1 but doesn't carry a CL2/CL3 or equivalent rating, and the Monoprice website (http://support.monoprice.com/link/po...e-available-in) states:

"However, a VW-1 rating does not necessarily mean that the cable is safe to run in wall"
If you read further down in that link provided it states that:

Non-Copper Cables
All of the fire safety ratings we have mentioned so far are for copper based cables. We are often asked if our optical cables are able to be run in wall. The brief answer is, yes they are. Our fiber optic cables are OFNR rated, Optical fiber nonconductive riser. This means that the cables have been tested to resist a fire should they come in contact with fire. As these cables to not carry any electricity, they themselves could not become the cause of a fire in the event of an electrical surge.
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post #90 of 400 Old 05-16-2017, 09:44 AM - Thread Starter
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...The only true way to "future proof" your system is to use conduit...
OR run your cable hidden but surface mounted such that it can be readily accessed and/or replaced at any time, such as using reliable 18Gbps HDMI cables that are only circa 3mm in external diameter, which can be invisibly run along/behind/under skirtings, carpets, rugs etc... Do this and there's no need to open up walls, ceilings, or use a conduit But otherwise yes absolutely

UPDATE: Hi folks, so we just received delivery of the longer length winning Monoprice cables, namely 75ft/23m, 100ft/31m, and 150ft/46m; where we will be carrying out the same testing and evalution on these and will post this REPORT #2 on here shortly with the results. The one thing that immediately struck us was just how ridiculously comparatively small is the box that contains 12 cables at these very long lengths where initial impressions are that the 150ft/46m length cables rolled up are smaller in size than some of the 50ft/15m cables that we tested, which is crazy... We'll take some comparative photos to illustrate this.

After that we will be covering the 'shorter-longer-length' cables, namely 20ft/6m - 33ft/10m, which we will publish as our REPORT #3.
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