Intermittent HDMI dropout - LG OLED65B6P - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-29-2017, 02:08 PM - Thread Starter
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Intermittent HDMI dropout - LG OLED65B6P

I apologize if I am reposting an already answered question. I searched the HDMI forum but was unable to find anything that fit.

I've had this TV for a year and the problem as well. However, because the connection comes out of an AVR into a CAT-5 line before reaching the TV it has taken me until today to determine the problem, as far as I can determine now, is actually at the TV.

Today, I discovered that turning the TV off and back on re-establishes the connection with 100% certainty, so far. The question is, what can be done to correct it?
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-29-2017, 03:48 PM
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I would try bypassing the CAT-5 cable and see if that corrects the issue. What kind of CAT-5, ethernet patch cable or a solid copper core cable? How long is your run from the AVR to the tv? I'd suspect the CAT-5 cable.
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-31-2017, 08:44 AM - Thread Starter
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The CAT-5 is in the wall connecting between two rooms so by-passing it is probably not workable. On top of that I don't have a sufficiently long HDMI cable to try it. I would probably need 30-40' to get through the doorway.

I'm not sure what an ethernet patch cable is. The CAT-5 I have is several solid copper insulated lines inside a sheath that is probably some kind of vinyl. I terminated both ends with ethernet connectors and use an HDBaseT pair to interface to short HDMI cables.

The run is probably about 20'.

The dropouts are pretty random. Sometimes they are a second apart. Sometimes it will go for hours without dropping out.

You are possibly correct that the problem is in the connecting cables. Since my original post I have discovered that turning the TV off and on is not a 100% solution, nor is doing the same with the AVR. Unfortunately, the only other solution I have encountered is wireless! My experience with wireless, especially Wi-Fi, is this could possibly be even less reliable.

An extreme solution might be to remove the baseboard in each room and try to run a single HDMI cable behind it. I've heard of this being done but I've never tried it.
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post #4 of 9 Old 08-31-2017, 09:03 AM
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Solid core CAT-5 (or preferably CAT-6) is usually 24AWG solid copper wires (4 pairs) that are individually insulated and then encased in a vinyl jacket. It is usually sold in spools and is not terminated. You can either terminate it with a punchdown keystone jack to extend an ethernet connection or terminate it with HDBT. It sounds like you do have solid core. A CAT-5 or 6 ethernet patch cable usually has a smaller AWG that comes pre-terminated and is what one would consider an ethernet cable. Not really very good for the higher video standards (4k, HDR, and maybe even 1080p).

It could be that the HDMI chipsets in your HDBT connections are not current enough to handle the distance, the video standard that you are attempting to push, and the cable rating. That's where a conduit comes in real handy. It makes swapping cables easier and keeping the bend radius to a minimum.
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post #5 of 9 Old 08-31-2017, 01:11 PM
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HDBT Extender - which model do you have?


CAT cable - have you used a Cable Tester to confirm your termination is good?


AVR - could you move it temporarily to prove the Video chain is working if you have a short HDMI cable between the AVR and the Display?


Sources - what are you using and is the problem happening with all Sources?


AVR - what do you have and is there a second Display attached to it?


Joe

Octava Inc. Multi-cast HD over LAN solutions.

Ruipro UK and EU Sales and Support

The Media Factory. Residential and Commercial system Design, Consultancy, Installation, Supply and Integration.
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post #6 of 9 Old 09-01-2017, 09:03 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
That's where a conduit comes in real handy. It makes swapping cables easier and keeping the bend radius to a minimum.
+1 there. I put them in when I built my house in PA but this house was built by somebody else.

I still think wireless might be the way to go except I am very skeptical that it really works.
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post #7 of 9 Old 09-01-2017, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbpeirce View Post
+1 there. I put them in when I built my house in PA but this house was built by somebody else.

I still think wireless might be the way to go except I am very skeptical that it really works.
Wireless audio is only wireless in that the side/rear speakers do not have a physical connection to the receiver. They are still wired together and need an outlet to plug into to power the receiver. Wireless does work but it seems that they all have issues eventually due to transceiver/receiver failures, interference, etc. Wireless HDMI, if that's what you'd be interested in, is not very reliable at all from what I've read, especially if you want to push the higher video/audio standards. Wired is really the only reliable, long term solution. And even that has issues at distances over 25', but I think it's easier to compensate and upgrade than a wireless solution.
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post #8 of 9 Old 09-01-2017, 09:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
Wireless audio is only wireless in that the side/rear speakers do not have a physical connection to the receiver. They are still wired together and need an outlet to plug into to power the receiver. Wireless does work but it seems that they all have issues eventually due to transceiver/receiver failures, interference, etc. Wireless HDMI, if that's what you'd be interested in, is not very reliable at all from what I've read, especially if you want to push the higher video/audio standards. Wired is really the only reliable, long term solution. And even that has issues at distances over 25', but I think it's easier to compensate and upgrade than a wireless solution.
Good to know. I don't want to go from an occasionally marginal solution to something worse. I think I will look into whether I can hide a cable behind the baseboard.
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post #9 of 9 Old 09-02-2017, 08:28 PM
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Here in OZ we found out a few months ago that wiring the Cat6 cable to "B" configuration when splitters are used has saved us lot of problems as the Aussie standard in "A". It was the helpful guys over at HDTV Supply in the US that informed us of this discrepancy due to most of these HDMI Cat splitters coming out of China are for the US market, and wired for "B".

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