4 projectors, 2 not IDd by Win 10 via HDMI - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 10 Old 09-08-2017, 02:47 PM - Thread Starter
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4 projectors, 2 not IDd by Win 10 via HDMI

I have 4 Vivitek D927tw short throw projectors, circa 2010 production. They have one HDMI input, an RS232 serial in, old-style usb a square in, and lan in.

When connected by HDMI, 2 of these projectors are properly and immediately recognized by Windows 10 laptops.

As of yesterday, one of these projectors quit being recognized as a source by any Win 10 laptop connected to it. My husband plugged a new 3-way, powered HDMI hub into it and --zoinks!-- Win 10 laptops suddenly no longer see it.

Via HDMI, it is still detected by Linux laptops, a DishTV Hopper box, cell phones via slimport, and chromecast.
It is detected by Win 10 laptops, of course, when connected by serial cable.

We checked projector number 4 (I'm not sure whether the powered HDMI hub was plugged in first or not) and found that this one also is not recognized by any Win 10 laptops connected to it.

I understand these are old projectors and sometimes things just wear out, but it seems more likely that there is an error with the HDMI. I have read a bit about broken edid, using inf files to override wrong edid, using the Powerstrip prog, and re-flashing the chips with or without removal (but my willingness to desolder over this is at zero).

Does this sound like an HDMI edid issue and, if so, can you suggest the easiest, least invasive mechanism for potentially fixing the problem with the 2 misbehaving projectors? Thank you for any help!
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post #2 of 10 Old 09-08-2017, 07:27 PM - Thread Starter
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* I have switched out the HDMI cables and used the cables that work on 2 of 4 projectors, so it is not a cable issue.
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post #3 of 10 Old 09-09-2017, 01:56 AM
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System - without an overview of the system it is tricky to unpick where your issue may be.


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post #4 of 10 Old 09-11-2017, 02:06 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi Joe,

These four projectors have been used in separate rooms (in lieu of a TV) at our house and have been connected via their single HDMI port to a single media device (usually a laptop) at any one time in the past. They are not networked or otherwise connected to each other or anything else and none of the other inputs are in use on any of them. They are only: laptop > HDMI cable > projector.

All of our tests on each projector were thus: media device > HDMI cord > projector. The only other cable coming out of any of the projectors is the power cord.

1) The first Vivitek D927tw projector is mounted on the ceiling and connected by ~5' HDMI cord to a Linux laptop. It is recognized by Linux laptops, Chromecast, cell phones via adapter, and a Dish Hopper box when connected to it by HDMI. It is not recognized as a display by any Win 10 laptop or PS3 or PS4 game console. It worked properly with any media device connected to it via HDMI until last Thursday.

2) The second D927tw is connected to a Win 10 laptop via ~15 HDMI cord and is functioning properly. It is recognized properly as a display by any Win 10 or Linux laptop or any other media device connected to it by HDMI.

The other two D927tws are sitting in a cupboard at this time.

3) When we tested them a few days ago the third D927tw, like #2 , was recognized by any Win 10 or Linux laptop or other media device connected to it by HDMI.

4) The fourth, like #1 , was recognized by Linux laptops, Chromecast, cell phones, and a Dish Hopper box when connected to it by HDMI, but was not recognized by any Win 10 laptops or PS3 and PS4 game consoles. This projector was last known to work properly with any media device connected by HDMI about a year ago.

Because I know cables can be an issue, I tried 6 different HDMI cables on each of the four projectors and the result is exactly the same on each projector regardless of which HDMI cable is connected to it.

I tried 5 different Windows 10 laptops, 1 Linux laptop, a Dish Hopper box, various cell phones via slimport adapter, a Chromescast dongle, a PS3 game console, and a PS4 game console, each device connected one at a time via an HDMI cable to the single HDMI port on the back of each of the four D927tw projectors and adequate time allowed for the device to be recognized. The result is exactly the same, as stated previously, on each projector regardless of which media device is connected to it.

I know Win 10 can be finicky and unstable and various drivers can be an issue when it comes to HDMI, which is why I tried everything from a low-end on-board Intel HD 4900 graphics chip to a medium AMD Radeon gpu to several high-end Nvidia geforce GTX gpus with 2 to 4 GB dedicated memory. Again, the result is exactly the same on each projector regardless of which laptop and type of graphics card is connected to it.

4 projectors of exactly the same age and model.
2 projectors work with any media device connected to them via HDMI.
2 projectors are not recognized by Windows 10 computers or PS3 or PS4 game consoles when connected via HDMI.

I hope that helps.

Thank you,

Susan
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post #5 of 10 Old 09-11-2017, 11:22 AM
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Entech provides a free "MonInfo" utility for Windows which you can use to display in real-time the EDID of the connected HDMI device. If it can manage to read the EDID you might be able to determine what, if anything, is different among the projectors.

Unfortunately, it could be that the HDMI chipsets in the failing projectors were damaged when connecting them to the hubs you mention. In general it's best to power things off when swapping cables.
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post #6 of 10 Old 09-11-2017, 09:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi Selden,

Thank you for your suggestion. I agree about cables, but my husband has other ideas... He has lots of other great qualities though.

The two problem projectors display "searching for source" and eventually "no source found" when I connect Windows laptops. MonInfo provides active info only for the on-board laptop display.

MonInfo does, however, show stored registry info for these projectors, which becomes active when connected to the projectors that are recognized by Win10. Includes raw data.

Using a Linux laptop, which is recognized by all the projectors, I was able to pull up and compare info from one of the problem projectors with one recognized by Windows. (using the command: ls /sys/class/drm/*/edid | xargs -i{} sh -c "echo {}; parse-edid < {}")

On the problem projector the extension block is found, but then fails checksum. On the functioning projector the extension block is found and parsed, showing 16 modes.

I'm looking at Linux-based EDID dumping and writing utilities to pull the good data off the functioning projector and flash it to the corrupt chip.
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post #7 of 10 Old 09-12-2017, 10:11 AM
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DR HDMI - out in the field our first option would be to stick an HDF DR HDMI between the Laptop and the Projector and see if you can force the Laptop to Output a video signal.


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post #8 of 10 Old 09-12-2017, 07:10 PM - Thread Starter
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Ah. Thank you, Joe. Unfortunately, I don't have a Dr HDMI on hand. I think the chip is unlocked and, because I have good data on two other projectors of the same model, I'll try re-flashing it via serial cable and a Linux-based edid writing program. I'll post the results.
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post #9 of 10 Old 09-14-2017, 11:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Well, we can mark this one "solved."

Here’s the solution that worked for me, in case someone else needs it in the future.

For this to work, the easiest way is that you will need to either a.) have a second functional monitor or projector that you can grab a good edid bin file from, or b.) contact the manufacturer for a copy of the original edid bin file, or c.) look online for someone with a functioning monitor/projector of the same make and model that already shared the file or is kind enough to grab the file from their monitor and send it to you.

You will need:
- a Linux-based computer (may be able to boot a live cd on your Windows pc)
- a good quality HDMI cable
- a good edid bin file from the same make and model of projector or monitor or a good donor edid bin file from the manufacturer or a donor from someone with the same display device.
- adventurous spirit and a healthy dose of fatalism
- about 1 hour
In Debian / Ubuntu Linux, follow the directions here:
A. https://www.chalk-elec.com/?p=1905

B. https://github.com/bulletmark/edid-rw

C. https://hubpages.com/technology/how-...corrupted-edid
I am describing the explicit directions again here, so it is all in one place and, hopefully, a little easier to follow. Actual commands you need to type are bolded in italics.

WARNING: Use this information and/or procedure at your own risk. This procedure or any parts thereof could destroy your projector, monitor, or computer and you should not expect any specific results or outcomes. You should probably only try this as a last resort. I take no responsibility for any damage or defect to your monitor, projector, computer, or any other device attributable to your use of any of these procedures or applications. I do hope it works for you though.

1. Open a terminal window to install the requisite software (you may need to install git before proceeding, e.g. sudo apt-get install git or other programs; Linux will usually tell you how to install what’s missing):

sudo apt-get install python-smbus

sudo apt-get install edid-decode

sudo apt-get install ghex

2. Get the source for the edid-rw application:

git clone https://github/bulletmark/edid-rw cd edid-rw

3. Make edid-rw excutable:

sudo chmod 755 edid-rw

3a. Make sure you actually are in the correct directory ~/edid-rw before proceeding. If you closed down your original terminal window for some reason and opened a new terminal window, you’ll need to change back to the edid-rw directory, so type cd edid-rw at the command prompt. If you get “command not found” here or somewhere later in the process, check you’re in the edid-rw directory and that you changed the folder permissions, e.g. sudo chmod 755 edid-rw.

4. To gain access to the I2C bus you’ll need to make the kernel module for I2C development active:

sudo modprobe i2c-dev

5. Via HDMI, if you haven’t already, plug your Linux computer into your good monitor.
If you don’t have a good monitor and are using a donor edid bin file then just skip to step 8.

Find out which bus your HDMI monitor or projector is on. My Vivitek (Delta) projector was on bus 4. Start probing bus 0 and work your way up until you find the one you want to work with. In a terminal window,at the edid-rw directory (see step 3a) type:

sudo ./edid-rw 0 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 1 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 2 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 3 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 4 | edid-decode

When you find the right bus it should display info matching the monitor or projector you want to work with. See examples of output at links above for 1. chalk-elec and 3. hubpages.

6. Make a copy of your good edid info (replace the number 4 in the command below with whichever number bus you found your monitor or projector on in step 5):

sudo ./edid-rw 4 > edid.bin

(If you don’t have a good monitor to pull from or can’t acquire a good donor edid bin file, then you could save the info from your misbehaving monitor and edit it in the hex editor: sudo ghex edid.bin to fix checksum errors, etc. and save as a new file to be written back to your monitor or projector. See for more info: https://hubpages.com/technology/how-...corrupted-edid )

7. Disconnect your HDMI cable from the good monitor or projector.

8. Connect an HDMI cable from your Linux computer to your misbehaving monitor or projector.

Find out which bus your HDMI monitor or projector is on. My Vivitek (Delta) projector was on bus 4. Start probing bus 0 and work your way up until you find the one you want to work with. In a terminal window, at the edid-rw directory (see step 3a) type:

sudo ./edid-rw 0 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 1 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 2 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 3 | edid-decode
(if no valid response or info doesn’t match then move on to next bus)
sudo ./edid-rw 4 | edid-decode

When you find the right bus it should display info matching the monitor or projector you want to work with. See examples of output at links above for 1. chalk-elec and 3. hubpages.

My projector had a bad checksum, which was reported after using the above command.

8a. Write down the number of the I2C bus you found your monitor or projector info on.

9. If your good edid bin file isn’t there already, place it in the edid-rw directory. You can copy it via a file manager.

10. In a terminal window at the edid-rw directory, write the good edid info to your projector or monitor, remembering to make any needed changes to the code below (e.g. change the number 4 below to whichever bus number you found your hardware on and wrote down in step 8a and change the name of the edid bin file to whatever you saved your bin file as in step 6, or to whatever the name of the file you received from the manufacturer or a donor):

sudo ./edid-rw -w 4 < edid.bin

11. Check that the new edid file was written correctly, replacing the number 4 below with whatever number your bus was that you wrote down in step 8a.

sudo ./edid-rw 4 | edid-decode

If everything went okay, any errors should be gone and when you plug your media device in it will again work properly.

For me, as soon as I’d confirmed the edid file had written properly I yanked the HDMI plug (contrary to all good form) out of the back of my Linux laptop and jammed it into the nearest Windows 10 laptop and –voila!-- the display was instantly and perfectly mirrored again on my old projector. I repeated the process, starting with step 8 on the other misbehaving projector and enjoyed the same results.

Many thanks to Mark Blakeney at http://bullet-systems.net/ who wrote edid-rw, Dr. Ace Jeangle at https://www.chalk-elec.com/?p=1905, , and petepr IM at https://hubpages.com/technology/how-...corrupted-edid
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post #10 of 10 Old 09-15-2017, 07:44 AM
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Yay!
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