Firewire to any other digital format? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 2 Old 06-20-2011, 07:16 PM - Thread Starter
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I thought I'd make a thread on this otherwise-dead sub-forum, breathe some life into it on a topic I think a lot of us A/V collectors are starting to face.

A number of turn-of-the-millenia A/V equipment made use of IEEE 1394 with 4-pin cables (aka FW400, aka i.Link) to transmit raw, digital data from the source to the display or compatible receiver. In addition, early HD Recorders only had i.Link ports to accept incoming HD signals (D-VHS, even Blu-Ray in early form). The problem is that while these same devices can still record from a Cable Box with compatible FW output, they can no longer pass video to a modern display via i.Link due to the lack of such inputs.

My question is this: is there a way to convert a copy-protected i.Link stream (or even unprotected i.Link stream) to a copy-protected HDMI stream? I want to clarify that I do NOT want to break copy-protection here, since that's illegal in several countries. Rather, I am looking for a way to essentially convert it to a modern format, for compatibility sake with a more permanent connector format (HDMI). Was there ever a device made for this purpose, or a video processor that had such a capability? Model numbers, price points, etc are appreciated.

If such a device does NOT exist...why not? And don't say incompatibility - HDMI and Firewire merely carry bitstreams of information, and I have no doubt a simple conversion box could take a bitstream from i.Link and convert it to work with HDMI. I also realize that the day will come when analog connectors disappear entirely from TVs, and I'm fully aware that one day, even HDMI will be a "legacy" connector. For now though, I'm looking to keep some old Firewire equipment working in a modern setup, while maintaining their complete functionality as best as possible.

Thanks in advance!

BONUS QUESTION (For IEEE Members): Is the i.Link DRM of 5C compatible with HDMI? If not, why, considering niche support for DSD and DVD-Audio? How hard would it be to decrypt a 5C signal and encrypt it to HDCP, without the decrypted signal being accessible?
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post #2 of 2 Old 06-20-2011, 07:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinGN View Post

I thought I'd make a thread on this otherwise-dead sub-forum, breathe some life into it on a topic I think a lot of us A/V collectors are starting to face.

A number of turn-of-the-millenia A/V equipment made use of IEEE 1394 with 4-pin cables (aka FW400, aka i.Link) to transmit raw, digital data from the source to the display or compatible receiver. In addition, early HD Recorders only had i.Link ports to accept incoming HD signals (D-VHS, even Blu-Ray in early form). The problem is that while these same devices can still record from a Cable Box with compatible FW output, they can no longer pass video to a modern display via i.Link due to the lack of such inputs.

My question is this: is there a way to convert a copy-protected i.Link stream (or even unprotected i.Link stream) to a copy-protected HDMI stream? I want to clarify that I do NOT want to break copy-protection here, since that's illegal in several countries. Rather, I am looking for a way to essentially convert it to a modern format, for compatibility sake with a more permanent connector format (HDMI). Was there ever a device made for this purpose, or a video processor that had such a capability? Model numbers, price points, etc are appreciated.

If such a device does NOT exist...why not? And don't say incompatibility - HDMI and Firewire merely carry bitstreams of information, and I have no doubt a simple conversion box could take a bitstream from i.Link and convert it to work with HDMI. I also realize that the day will come when analog connectors disappear entirely from TVs, and I'm fully aware that one day, even HDMI will be a "legacy" connector. For now though, I'm looking to keep some old Firewire equipment working in a modern setup, while maintaining their complete functionality as best as possible.

Thanks in advance!

BONUS QUESTION (For IEEE Members): Is the i.Link DRM of 5C compatible with HDMI? If not, why, considering niche support for DSD and DVD-Audio? How hard would it be to decrypt a 5C signal and encrypt it to HDCP, without the decrypted signal being accessible?

How about because most IEEE-1394 video was MPEG2-based and HDMI is an uncompressed video stream? It's the difference between tens of megabits per second (IEEE-1394) and hundreds of megabits per second (HDMI).

Very different signals...

The conversion equipment already exists. Just use a DVHS deck (if you can find one). They all had HDMI outputs (wth the possible exception of the DH30000). The video was brought in with 1394, recorded (if chosen) and then uncompressed for component video output and HDMI output.
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